Not every wine needs to be profound, protean, fathomless and brooding, as I have asserted many times and will probably do so many more times before I shuffle off to Buffalo, a ditty that has, by the way, been looping through the convoluted canyons of my mind for several days. (Why do these things occur? I haven’t seen “42nd Street” since I was a mere lad innocent of the vine.) Anyway, often all we require of a wine is that it offer enough character that our noses lab_Carmenere_piu.pngand palates perk up and the flavors and body to go with whatever we’re eating at the moment. Such a one that fulfills these obligations and more is the Inama Carmenere Puì… 2013, from the Colli Berici wine region of the Veneto. The wine is classified, in fact, as a Veneto Rosso, being composed of 70 percent carmenere grapes and 30 percent merlot. It aged 12 months in second-use French barriques. For those of you who believe that the carmenere grape is exclusive to Chile, remember that it was grown in Europe first, before migrating to South America, where for decades people thought it was merlot. C’est la vie! The Inama Carmenere Puì… 2013 sports a dark ruby robe and a bright, ripe and engaging bouquet of black and red cherries and currants buoyed by notes of bitter chocolate, tapenade and rosemary, with a bit of that herb’s dry, resinous power. It’s robust without being rustic, amply furnished with vibrant acidity and dry, slightly dusty, mineral-flecked tannins and displaying plenty of spicy black fruit flavors. The tannic influence increases as the minutes pass, contributing to a finish that feels a bit austere. 13.5 percent alcohol. If you’re firing up the grill, consider this wine with leg of lamb studded with rosemary and garlic; pork chops crusted with a Southwestern rub; or, as we employed it, with baked ziti. Drink now through 2018 to 2020. Very Good+. About $20.

Imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif. A sample for review.