One of the most reliable red wines in California is the Dry Creek Vineyard Heritage Vines Zinfandel, which for 2013 lives up to its reputation for delicious dependability. “Heritage Vines” doesn’t mean that the vines in question are old themselves but that they were grafted onto rootstock from “historic pre-Prohibition vineyards,” thus, in a way, preserving a connection to Sonoma County’s tradition of old zinfandel vines. At 76 percent zinfandel, this wine barely qualifies as varietal, the federal government requiring 75 percent of a grape variety in order for it to be declared on the label. (The ratio rises to 85 percent for estate wines.) The rest of the Dry Creek Vineyard Heritage Vines Zinfandel 2013, Sonoma County, consists of 21 percent petite sirah, two percent primitivo and one percent carignane. The sharp-eyed among My Readers will immediately exclaim, “But primitivo and zinfandel are the same grape, n’est-ce pas? DNA has spoken.” Actually, DNA testing revealed that the Italian primitivo grape and the zinfandel grape, originating in Europe but grown primarily in California, are clones of the rare Croatian grape named Crljenak. Hence they are very similar — some references assert that zinfandel is closer to the parent grape — but not exactly identical, though they tend to be regarded as synonymous. American labeling laws, however, do not allow the names to be used interchangeably, so grapes from primitivo vines grown from Italian cuttings must be cited separately. Got that?

Dry Creek Vineyard Heritage Vines Zinfandel 2013 aged 15 months in French, American and Hungarian oak barrels. The color is a radiant dark ruby with a violet-purple edge; aromas of blackberries and blueberries are infused with notes of graphite, mint, lavender and burgeoning elements of iodine and sandalwood; a few moments in the glass bring in touches of tapenade and fruitcake. Over a lithe and supple texture, just hinting at muscularity and moderately dusty tannins, the wine offers faceted, spiced and peppery flavors of blackberries and blueberries with undertones of black raspberry and plum; from mid-palate through the finish the wine takes on effects of briers and brambles and slightly chiseled mineral qualities. This is about as classic as zinfandel gets. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink through 2017 with pizza — which we did — burgers and steaks, braised meat dishes, hearty pastas, fajitas. Excellent. About $20, marking Great Value.

A sample for review.

Winemakers in California often have little side projects that involve specialties near and dear to their hearts. When I was in Napa Valley recently, I met with Rebekah Wineburg and Erica Kincaid to try the initial effort from their Post & Vine label. I didn’t realize until we started talking that Wineburg is winemaker for Buccella Winery, a producer of limited edition, high-end wines, released in very self-consciously designed packages. The Buccella wine that I reviewed a couple of years ago, a cabernet sauvignon from 2009, cost $145 a bottle. I suppose one needs to unwind a bit from such monumental endeavors. Wineburg and Kincaid met while working at Rudd Winery; they decided to partner for Post & Vine, with Wineburg making the wine and Kincaid handling operations.

The Post & Vine Testa Vineyard Old Vine Field Blend 2012 is a blend of 42 percent zinfandel, 37 percent carignane and 21 percent petite sirah grown at the Testa Vineyards, founded in 1912 in Mendocino County near the hamlet of Calpella (pop. 679) by Italian immigrants Gaetano and Maria Testa and operated now by the fourth generation. As with many of the old Italian vineyards in Mendocino and Sonoma, the Testa Vineyard is planted to a mixture of carignane, petite sirah, zinfandel, barbera, grenache and charbono grapes; a neaby vineyard supplies cabernet sauvignon. The family makes wine under its own label as well as selling grapes.

The Post & Vine Testa Vineyard Old Vine Field Blend 2012 spent 18 months in mostly neutral oak barrels and was bottled unfined and unfiltered. The color is a vibrant dark lavender-violet hue; aromas of spiced and macerated red cherries and mulberries with a hint of blueberries (and raspberry raspiness) are couched in notes of slightly dusty graphite and a touch of mint; a few moments in the glass bring in elements of rose petals and loam. On the palate, the wine delivers a lively, resonant flow of blue and red fruit flavors permeated by earthiness, a tinge of briers and brambles and wisps of exotic spices — sandalwood, allspice — all energized by a lithe, supple texture and a structure that features clean lines and good bones, as one used to say about Audrey Hepburn’s face. 14.4 percent alcohol. There’s so much life and vibrancy in this wine that I found it irresistible. In its purity and intensity, it reminded me of one of my favorite wines from last year, the Clos Saron Out of the Blue 2013, 90 percent old vine cinsault, made by Gideon Bienstock in the Sierra Foothills. I don’t want to oversell the Post & Vine Testa Vineyard Old Vine Field Blend 2012 — nor the version for 2013, which contains less zinfandel and 11 percent grenache, tasting a barrel sample. These are not deeply profound potentially long-lived wines, though this 2012 should drink nicely through 2018 or ’20; they are, on the other hand, exactly the kinds of authentic and individual wines that I love to drink. Wineburg made 143 cases of this wine, so you’ll have to do a little digging to find some. I hope you will. The website is PostAndVine.com. Excellent. About $28.

Even for France, home of many venerable wine properties and vineyards, the domaine of Les Pallières qualifies as ancient, having been farmed by the same family since sometime in the 15th Century. Located in the foothills of the Dentelles de Montmirail outside the village of Gigondas in the Southern Rhone valley, the estate endured hard times in the 20th Century, and in 1998, faced with extensive repairs to the property and vineyards, the Roux brothers decided to sell. Fortunately, another pair of brothers, Daniel and Frédéric Brunier, owners of Vieux Télégraphe in Châteauneuf-du-Pape, learned about the situation and, with Kermit Lynch, their American importer, purchased the old estate and instituted a series of improvements and innovations. Particularly important was the separation, beginning in 2007, of the various lieux-dits, previously blended into one cuvée, into two distinct wines to emphasize the attributes of the terroir. Cuvée “Terrasse du Diable,” encompasses the low-yielding vines from the higher altitudes, up to 400 meters, that express great structure and intense minerality. Cuvée “Les Racines” showcases the vineyard parcels surrounding the winery—the origin of the domaine with the oldest vines—with the emphasis on freshness and an abundance of fruit. This division does not imply that Terrasse du Diable does not possess delicious fruit nor that Les Racines lacks structure.

These two wines, in their manifestations from 2010, are what I consider today. I encountered the pair at a trade tasting for Kermit Lynch products mounted by a local wholesale house. Now the current vintage on the market apparently is 2012, but distributors often showcase older wines they still have in stock at these events, hoping to interest retail stores that may have suitable costumers.

Until 1966, the wines from Gigondas were bottled as simple Côtes du Rhône; that year, they were elevated to Côtes du Rhône-Villages, and in 1971 Gigondas was awarded its own appellation. The reds must contain up to 80 percent grenache grapes, with syrah and/or mourvèdre accounting for 15 percent (though these two wines do not have that 15 percent). The other wine is rosé; whites are not produced.
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Les Pallières Terrasse du Diable 2010, Gigondas, is a blend of 90 percent grenache grapes, and five percent each mourvèdre and clairette, the latter a white grape, one of those allowed in Chateauneuf-du-Pape. The vines average 45 years old and are planted on steep one-row terraces in poor soil partly covered with rocky scree, in the northernmost area of the Gigondas appellation. The grapes were fermented in concrete and wooden vats, and the wine aged 10 months in vats and another 12 months in foudres, which is to say that these are large oak barrels; no small barriques were employed. The wine was bottled unfiltered. The color is medium ruby permeated with a mulberry hue; the first impression is of a wine that lives where the Wild Things are; it feels feral, fleshy and meaty, rich, ripe and spicy, bursting with notes of red and black currants and cherries with undertones of wild plum, graphite and lightly roasted fennel; a few moments in the glass bring up traces of violets, cloves, lavender and leather. This is weighty but not heavy on the palate, quite dry and framed by a wealth of slightly sanded and dusty tannins, as if the wine had been lightly burnished and delicately brushed with sage and thyme. Though well furnished with fresh and dried red and black fruit flavors, from mid-palate through the finish, Les Pallières Terrasse du Diable 2010 builds granitic austerity, dictating a few years aging to find poise. 14.5 percent alcohol. Best from 2016 or ’17 to 2025 or ’26. Excellent. About $45.
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Les Pallières Les Racines 2010, Gigondas, does not receive as much cement and wood aging as its stablemate mentioned above does. A blend of 80 percent grenache, eight percent syrah, seven percent cinsault and five percent clairette, Les Racines — “the roots” — ferments in cement cuves and large oaken foudres and then ages 10 months in cement and seven to nine months in foudres. Perhaps for that reason and a slightly lower altitude,, Les Racines ’10 feels a bit more generous and less extracted than Terrasse du Diable ’10, though no less rich in detail and dimension. This is all about ripe black fruit — blackberries, cherries and plums — supported by finely milled tannins, bright acidity and a polished graphite presence; aromas of cloves and sandalwood, violets and lavender sift from the glass in an exotic stream, while the wine flows through the mouth in a texture that’s spare and lithe. It’s very dry but flavorful and woodsy, infused with clean notes of loam, moss and forest floor, and the finish brings all elements together is a well-knit amalgam. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $45.
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Boy, the weather certainly has improved down in my neck o’ the woods. The temperature is reaching 75 this afternoon, and the sky is blue and clear as a bell. I see on the weather map that it’s going up into the mid 80s in southern Florida and California. Time, then, to break out a winsome, uncomplicated little white wine to sip while you’re out soaking up rays or relaxing on the porch or patio or perhaps while you’re in the kitchen rustling some dinner together. The wine is The Beach House Sauvignon Blanc 2014, from South Africa’s Western Cape region, and yeah, it’ll remind you of lying around on a beach or make you wish you were basking on one. It’s a blend of 75 percent sauvignon blanc and 15 percent semillon, made all in stainless steel for freshness and crisp immediacy. The color is very pale straw-gold, with a shimmer of light green; penetrating aromas of lemongrass, lime peel, grapefruit and mango are suffused with notes of figs and a kind of sunny-leafy quality. The brisk acidity and scintillating limestone elements start right at entry and continue to bring liveliness to the wine all through its passage of pineapple, peach, roasted lemon and hint of thyme through your happy mouth; an intriguing hint of grapefruit bitterness brings pizazz to the finish. The alcohol content is a nicely manageable 12.5 percent. Drink up and don’t worry your pretty little head about a thing, just nibble on some shrimp or chicken salad, deviled eggs, cucumber sandwiches; you get the idea. Very Good+. About $10, a Terrific Value.

Imported by Pacific Highway Wines & Spirits, Petaluma, Calif. A sample for review.

Sojourn Cellars was launched in 2001 with 100 cases of cabernet sauvignon. The winery, based in the town of Sonoma, was founded by Craig and Ellen Haserot with winemaker Erich Bradley. The (not uncommon) idea was to produce limited quantities of pure and intense chardonnay, cabernet sauvignon and pinot noir wines from excellent vineyards. Judging from my experience with a selection of chardonnays and pinot noirs from 2010 — link to my reviews here — and these examples from 2012, the team succeeds in their aim. As you will see, the chardonnay from the Durell Vineyard in the Sonoma Coast AVA was a bit flamboyant for my palate, but I find the pinot noirs to be perfect models of the grape’s delicate yet tensile marriage of power and elegance. All the wines are fermented by native yeasts; the pinots see 50 percent new French oak barrels. Though the length of time in oak was not specified in the technical information I received with these samples, the influence of the span spent in the new and used barrels resulted in wines of lovely suppleness and nuance.
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The Sojourn Cellars Durell Vineyard Chardonnay 2012, Sonoma Coast, is a “3 Bs” chardonnay: Not Bach, Beethoven and Brahms, but bold, bright and brassy. The color is luminous medium gold; forthright aromas of lightly roasted and caramelized pineapple and grapefruit are permeated by notes of cloves and ginger and hints of mango and orange rind; a quadrille of ripe and macerated stone-fruit parades across the palate, and I wish it revealed a bit more of a limestone and flint element and brisk acidity to balance the richness. Still, it’s not blatantly tropical, it’s not dessert-like, it’s not stridently spicy, though it’s a little over the top for my taste. The wine was barrel-fermented in 40 percent new French oak and underwent malolactic fermentation while aging. 14.3 percent alcohol. Production was 275 cases. Very Good+. About $54.
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The color of the Sojourn Cellars Wohler Vineyard Pinot Noir 2012, Russian River Valley, is an entrancing medium ruby-mulberry hue, while the hypnotic bouquet wreathes notes of cranberry and sassafras, black and red cherries, lavender and crushed violets with undertones of oolong tea and orange rind and hints of loam and mushrooms. These intoxicating elements segue seamlessly onto the palate, where they drape and flow like a dense satiny fabric of luxurious cost, though there’s nothing heavy or obvious here; this is a pinot noir that whatever its heft retains an essential grasp on the ineffable. The aromas deepen as an hour or so passes, and the wine grows increasingly floral and spicy; it’s quite dry, however, with a long finish that’s surprisingly mineral-flecked and tannic. Exquisite proportions, 14.2 percent alcohol. Production was 550 cases. Drink now through 2017 to ’20. Excellent. About $40.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ The Sojourn Sangiacomo Vineyard Pinot Noir 2012, Sonoma Coast, is characterized by racy acidity, and while the wine is delicate and elegant, it offers plenty of vitality and cut. The color is medium ruby-magenta; aromas of cloves and sassafras, red cherries and currants blend with hints of pomegranate and cranberry and notes of dried fruit and sandalwood, yes, there’s incense-like pungency in the glass. Despite a touch of cherry-berry succulence, the wine pulls up an element of briery-brambly earthiness and underbrush-infused loam for depth under its savory, slightly macerated black and red fruit flavors. Despite those factors, the wine feels poised, graceful and delectable. 14.5 percent alcohol. Production was 1,150 cases. Drink now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $54.
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The Sojourn Ridgetop Vineyard Pinot Noir 2012, Sonoma Coast, offers a limpid medium ruby-mulberry hue with a transparent rim; this is the earthiest of this trio of single-vineyard pinot noirs, displaying a full complement of briers, brambles and loam under layers of redness: I mean red cherries and raspberries, a hint of cranberry, a touch of red licorice. Vibrant acidity cuts a swath on the palate, making for a texture that’s spare and lithe though not meager; this, like its stablemates, remains generous and expansive in terms of fruit and spice while making rather serious demands in terms of its tannic and mineral-flecked structure, making it the most Burgundian of these examples, not that the comparison matters, but it indicates to me a certain style and philosophy. 14.4 percent alcohol. Production was 450 cases. Best from 2016 through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $59.
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The idea behind Rotation Wines is to produce drinkable cross-vintage blends and sell them at reasonable prices. No sneakiness enters into the concept. It is acceptable to the TTB — widely recognized abbreviation for Federal agency, the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau — that if a vintage wine carries a general “California” designation, it must contain at least 85 percent of wine from stated vintage, or only 85 percent — see the TTB code: §4.27(a)(2). A vintage wine that displays a specific American Viticultural Area (AVA), like Russian River Valley or Paso Robles, must contain at least 95 wine from the stated vintage. So, the Rotation Red Blend 2012, California, is a blend of 60 percent merlot and 30 percent zinfandel from 2012 and 10 percent ruby cabernet from 2010; the zinfandel was briefly aged in oak barrels. The grapes derived from Napa Valley and “nearby areas.” One does not often see ruby cabernet mentioned as a grape on a label, and indeed its use even as a blending grape in California is diminishing. It’s a cross between carignan and cabernet sauvignon produced at the University of California, Davis, in 1936. And what about the wine under consideration today? The Rotation Red Blend 2012 offers an intense, dark ruby color and fleshy, meaty aromas of spiced and macerated black and red cherries and currants; the spice notes involved lean toward the woodsy side of cloves and sandalwood; there’s also a touch of lavender and graphite. On the palate, the wine is simple and direct, very tasty with black fruit edged with red (both ripe and slightly baked) and bolstered by moderate tannins and lively acidity. Drink through the end of this year or into 2016 with burgers and pizzas, with hearty pasta dishes and fajitas. Very Good. About — and here’s the great part — $9 to $10.

A sample for review.

Sometimes all we require from a white wine is that it be clean, fresh, cold and tasty and that it goes down like a sea-breeze. Other times, however, we desire a white wine with more weight, with more character and savor, especially that latter quality. So today I offer 10 such white wines, produced from many wine regions and from a variety of grapes, a couple rather unusual. These are the white wines that stimulate the palate as well as refresh the spirit. As usual with these Weekend Wine Notes, I eschew a recital of technical detail, historical perspective and geographical data — all of which I adore — to present quick and incisive reviews designed to pique your interest and whet the old taste-buds. These wines, all rated Excellent except for one Exceptional, were either samples for review or were tasted at a wholesaler’s trade event. Enjoy, but with good sense and moderation.
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Abbazia di Novacella Kerner 2013, Valle Isarco, Alto Adige, Italy. 13.5% alc. (You may add kerner to your list of obscure grapes.) Medium straw-gold hue with a faint green cast; roasted lemon, notes of quince and ginger, thyme and pine resin, touch of peach and a tantalizing hint of iris and lilac; slightly dusty and buoyant texture, focus on bright acidity and clean limestone minerality; spiced pear and yellow plum flavors with a saline edge. Now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $19, marking Good Value.
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Alois Lageder Haberle Pinot Bianco 2013, Sudtirol, Alto Adige, Italy. 13% alc. Pale gold color; every aspect of lemon: lemon peel, lemon balm, lemon curd, with hints of green apple, peach and grapefruit, a whiff of almond blossom and rosemary; a savory and saline pinot blanc, trussed by limestone and flint minerality that devolves to a bracing finish featuring a bite of grapefruit bitterness. Now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $23.
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Éric Chevalier Clos de la Butte 2013, Muscadet Côtes de Grand Lieu Sur Lie, Loire Valley, France. 11.5% alc. 100% melon de Bourgogne grapes. Pale straw-gold hue; unusually sizable and savory for Muscadet, with a lithe, sinewy structure based on fleet acidity and glittering limestone and flint minerality; pert and redolent with lemon and lime peel and a hint of almond blossom; notes of pear and apple; overall, glistening and glassy, delicate and finely-knit but with impressive heft. Now through 2016 to ’18. Excellent. About $16, a Real Bargain.
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Clemens Busch Grauen Schiefer Riesling Trocken 2012, Mosel, Germany. 12% alc. Shimmering pale gold color; distinct aromas of lychee and rubber eraser, cloves, lime peel and grapefruit and a pert gingery quality, touch of jasmine; blazing acidity and scintillating limestone minerality; quite dry but with inherent citrus and stone-fruit ripeness; lovely lithe texture with elegant heft; a hint of loamy earthiness in the finish. A brilliant riesling. Now through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $30.
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Etre Chardonnay 2012, Sonoma County. (Saxon Brown’s unoaked chardonnay.) 13.5% alc. 447 cases. Medium straw-gold color; ripe and spicy pineapple and grapefruit scents and flavors; an intriguing whiff of toasted oats; cloves and orange rind; all ensconced in lime peel and limestone minerality; bare hint of honeysuckle and mango; notes of spiced pear and roasted lemon; lively but not crunchy acidity; seductively lush texture but nothing opulent or obvious. Why would this need oak? Now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $28.
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Grgich Hills Estate Fume Blanc 2013, Napa Valley. 14.1% alc. 100% sauvignon blanc grapes. Certified organic. Pale gold hue; lime peel and lemongrass, grapefruit and jasmine, mint and heather, a touch of guava, all seamlessly wreathed with a sort of breathless ease; lime and a note of peach in the mouth, a hint of thyme and timothy, lovely supple refined structure, a golden core of quince and ginger; finish is all flint, limestone and grapefruit rind. Now through 2017 or ’18. Exceptional. About $30.
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Kennedy Shah Dubrut Vineyard Reserve Riesling 2012, Yakima Valley, Washington. 13.3% alc. Pale gold color; penetrating and provocative aromas of petrol, lychee, peach and spiced pear, top-notes of lemongrass and lime peel; crushed gravel and shale; very dry but luminously fruit-filled and animated by bright acidity and a vibrant limestone presence; notes of lime pith and grapefruit bitterness on the finish. A chiseled, multi-faceted riesling with plenty of appeal. Now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $25 .
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André & Michel Quenard Les Abymes 2013, Savoie, France. 11% alc. 100% jacquere grapes (to be added to your roster of obscure grapes). Very pale gold color; cloves, cedar and mint, roasted lemon and spiced pear; vibrant acidity with a crisp edge, and more steel than limestone; clean and refreshing but with a woodsy aura and a touch of mossy earthiness on the finish. Drink through 2016. Excellent. About $20.
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Saxon Brown Fighting Brothers Cuvee Semillon 2012, Sonoma County. 13.5% alc. 334 cases. Pale gold hue; beeswax, fig, quince and ginger; slightly leafy and herbal; candied orange peel, hint of mango; back-notes of spiced and brandied stone-fruit; wonderful sleek, silken texture, slides across the tongue like money; quite spicy and savory on the palate, with lip-smacking acidity and a wisp of limestone minerality. Pretty damned irresistible. Now through 2016 to ’18. Excellent. About $28.
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Schloss Schonborn Riesling Trocken 2010, Rheingau, Germany. 11.5% alc. Crystalline and transparent in every sense, with marked purity and intensity; very pale gold color; winsome jasmine and honeysuckle, ripe and spicy pear, peach and lychee; hints of lemon balm and lemon curd; incisive acidity and decisive limestone and flint elements; slightly candied lime and grapefruit peel, cloves and ginger; the finish is all hewn limestone, a little austere and aloof. Now through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $18, representing Great Value.
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El Porvenir de Cafayate is a 40-year-old estate located high in the Andean foothills of the Cafayate Valley in the province of Salta, about 520 miles north of the city of Mendoza, in northwest Argentina. Owned by the Romero family, El Porvenir is run by Lucia Romero-Marcuzzi (seen in this image), with winemaker Mariano Quiroga Adamo and consultant Paul Hobbs from California, concentrating on torrontés and tannat grapes but making wine from many other varieties as well. How high? These are some of the highest elevation vineyards in the world, ranging from 5,413 to 5,577 feet above sea-level. The semi-desert climate is very dry, with warm days and cold nights, and the poor soil demands of grapes that they send roots far down in search of water and nutrients. The vineyards at El Porvenir de Cafayate are farmed using sustainable methods, including no pesticides and spare deployment of herbicides. I thought that generally these were well-made and stylish wines that exhibited gratifying character — with one exception, the oak-fermented Laborum Single Vineyard Torrontés 2013. I’ll speak more about this wine when its turn comes.

Paul Hobbs Imports, Sebastopol, Calif. Samples for review.
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The color of El Porvenir de Cafayate Amauta Absoluto Torrontés 2012, Cafayate, Salta, is a tranquil very pale gold; enticing aromas of jasmine and camellia, lime and grapefruit are tinged with notes of lemon balm and bees-wax. The wine is made in stainless steel tanks and undergoes malolactic fermentation, the chemical transformation of sharp malic (“apple-like”) acid into smooth lactic (“milk-like”) acid. The result is not lush or creamy but a lovely silken texture that feels spun from gossamer clouds. Stone-fruit flavors are energized by hints of grapefruit rind and limestone minerality, while the finish brings in touches of melon and almond skin bitterness. 13.1 percent alcohol. Production was 850 cases. With its gentle floral nature, winsome balance between citrus and stone-fruit and its slight tension between sprightly acidity, on the one hand, and moderate richness, on the other, I think that this is as good as the torrontés grape gets and deserves to be. Excellent. About $16, a Rare Value.
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I believe that wine from some grapes cannot be improved by putting it through an oak regimen; I started to write “by throwing oak at it,” but I’ll be more circumspect. Anyway, that process merely lays a burden of wood on the wine that interferes with its inherent nature. One such grape is torrontés, a grape and a wine whose essential delicacy and lovely simplicity can be marred by the oak experience. El Porvenir Laborum Single Vineyard Torrontés 2013, Cafayate, Salta, fermented in new French oak barrels and aged in barrels for six months. The color is pale straw-gold; the nose offers touches of green apple, lime peel, melon and jasmine and a background of woody/woodsy/spicy notes; a distracting hint of vanilla seems like nothing that should ever happen to torrontés (or any wine). The oak lends the wine a seductive supple texture that permeates slightly roasted and honeyed lemon and peach flavors. Overall, you feel the oak as a superfluous drag on the wine, a dimension that detracts from its typical delightful character. Is this example a “better” torrontés than one made without oak? I don’t think so. 13.2 percent alcohol. Production was 540 cases. Very Good. About $22.
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Now we turn to the reds.

First, El Porvenir Amauta Corte 1 — Inspiration 2013, Cafayate, Salta, a blend of 60 percent malbec grapes, 30 percent cabernet sauvignon and 10 percent syrah. The grapes fermented in stainless steel, and the wine aged eight months in second-use French and American oak barrels, meaning that the wine was not exposed to new wood. The color is intense ruby-purple; intense, also, are the aromas of ripe and spicy black currants, black cherries and plums permeated by notes of tar, espresso, bitter chocolate and graphite. Intense, again, are the succulent black and red fruit flavors that reveal hints of black tea, fruitcake and violets over a tide of moderately plush, dusty tannins. 14.5 percent alcohol. Production was 1,250 cases. Man up to grilled pork chops with a coffee rub or braised veal shanks with this bottle, now through 2017 to ’19. Very Good+. About $23.
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El Porvenir Amauta Absoluto Tannat 2014, Cafayate, Salta, is the estate’s entry-level tannat offering, and it’s worth the price for pairing with burgers and chorizo quesadillas, hearty pasta dishes and sausage pizza or goat empanadas. The color is dark ruby with a purple rim; aromas of black and blue fruit meld with notes of fruitcake and tapenade, mint and coffee and leather and a whiff of potpourri. The wine is dense and chewy, enlivened by bright acidity and given some bearing by dusty tannins, all deftly melded into a sleek package. 14.5 percent alcohol. Production was 1,667 cases. Very Good+. About $16, representing Good Value.
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A wine like El Porvenir Laborum Tannat 2013, Cafayate, Salta, could convince me that tannat is the red grape that Argentine growers should be cultivating, rather than malbec. The color is dark ruby-purple with a magenta rim; boy, it’s one ripe, fleshy, meaty wine, packed with notes of rich black currant, blueberry and black cherry fruit loaded with tar, leather, violets and roasted coffee beans. The wine spent 12 months in new French oak barrels and absorbed that wood pretty handily, in the form of a firm and lithe structure, but there’s also real tannic grip on the palate, freighted with dusty graphite and an iodine and iron finish. The intense. minty and deeply spicy black fruit flavors shine through, but this could still use a year or two to unfurl a bit. 14.7 percent alcohol. Production was 540 cases. Excellent. About $34.
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Most of us, including people in the wine industry, can have no idea what it feels like to own an estate where grapes have been grown since 1273. That privilege belongs to the establishment Marco Felluga — now run by fifth generation Roberto Falluga — which purchased the 250-acre Russiz Superiore property — half planted to vines — in 1967. The part of the world of which I write here is Collio, in the Friuli region of Italy, far in the northeast, an area influenced by the warmth of the Adriatic Sea, 12 miles away, and the coolness of the nearby Alps. Friuli and the northeast generally are white wine territory, but red wine is also produced, and our Wine of the Week is one of those. The Marco Felluga Russiz Superiore Cabernet Franc 2012, Collio, offers a deep black-ruby hue with a vibrant violet rim; it’s all a bit thermonuclear. The wine is 100 percent cabernet franc, and it aged 12 months in small oak casks, a device that lends it lovely suppleness and a subtle spicy background, but nothing obtrusive. This feels, in fact, like classic Loire Valley cab franc, with its seamless amalgam of cedar and tobacco, plums, blueberries and raspberries permeated by notes of black olives, loam and oolong tea; hints of cloves and sandalwood emerge after a few moments in the glass. The wine is robust, dense, almost chewy yet never heavy or overbearing, being, rather, sleek and chiseled in texture. Black fruit flavors are supported by clean acidity, mildly dusty tannins and an undercurrent of earthy graphite minerality. 14 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2017 or ’18 with hearty braised meat dishes, full-flavored pastas, grilled pork chops or steaks. Excellent. About $28.

Imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif. A sample for review.

I wrote about the FEL Wines Chardonnay 2013 and Pinot Noir 2012, carrying Anderson Valley designations, in Part VI of this series about chardonnay and pinot noirs wines from the same producer. For this entry, we go to single vineyard versions of these wines. The idea behind issuing wines from a single vineyard source, instead of a more general regional or county/valley-wide source, is that a single vineyard will offer more character and individuality in the finished wine than a broader designation would. That sounds fine in theory, but it doesn’t always work out that way, especially when techniques in the winery mute or obliterate whatever qualities may have been inherent in the grapes and the soil and micro-climate from which they derive, as seems to be the case with this chardonnay. Richard Savoy, owner of a well-known bookstore in San Francisco, planted the vineyard that would bear his name in 1991. It lies at the mid-point of Mendocino County’s Anderson Valley, just west of the town of Philo, occupying an area that slopes gently toward the southwest. He sold the vineyard in 2011 but continues to advise on farming for Ryan Hodgins, winemaker for FEL wines.

These bottles were samples for review.
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The FEL Savoy Vineyard Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley, aged 14 months in French oak, 56 percent of which were new barrels.The color is dark but vivid ruby; subtle notes of loam and graphite support enticing aromas of black cherries, currants and plums infused with cloves and allspice — with a hint of the latter’s woodsy astringency — sassafras and potpourri, all amounting to a sensuous panoply of complicated but deftly melded effects. Matters are a bit more ambiguous in the mouth, as the palate feels cleansed by bright acidity that drives spicy black fruit flavors through a lithe, supple and satiny texture to a finish that demands attention with a nod to dry slightly dusty tannins and notes of leather and underbrush. Great authority here, as well as spare elegance, exactly what I want in well-made pinot noir. 14.2 percent alcohol. Production was 645 cases. Drink now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $65.
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The FEL Savoy Vineyard Chardonnay 2012, Anderson Valley, pushes every wrong button in my relationship to chardonnay and how it is too often made in California. It was fermented in French oak barrels, 50 percent new, and aged 15 months sur lie, that is, on the residue of yeast cells. The color is bright medium gold; bold and vivacious aromas of ripe and roasted pineapple and grapefruit are permeated by notes of cloves, quince and ginger and hints of papaya and mango. It’s a super sleek chardonnay whose citrus and stone-fruit flavors are saturated by obtrusive elements of toffee, baked apple, caramelized lemon curd and orange scented creme brulee, all cloying and stridently spicy. I’ve asked this question a thousand times: Why would anyone make chardonnay like this, and why would anyone drink it? 14.2 percent alcohol. Production was 138 cases. Not recommended. About $48.
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