Yes, indeed, My Readers, today launches the ninth edition of “Twelve Days of Christmas with Champagne and Sparkling Wine,” and I’m changing the format a bit to accommodate different genres and styles of sparkling wine. Each day of the series, I will offer two examples, one a Champagne (I hope) and the second an alternate sort of sparkling wine, though one post will be devoted to Prosecco because it’s so popular, and producers are trying to make an up-scale shift. As usual, on New Year’s Eve, I’ll offer three or four products at various prices.

So, on we go, enjoy and Merry Christmas!
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ayala
The house of Ayala was founded in 1860 by Edmond de Ayala in the village of Aÿ, which looks like the name of an exotic seductress in a science-fiction movie. The estate was operated by the family until 2005, when it was acquired by Bollinger. The Ayala Brut Majeur, nv, is a blend of 40 percent chardonnay, 40 percent pinot noir and 20 percent pinot meunier. It rests on the lees — the residue of dead yeast cells — in the bottle for an average of eight years. The color is pale gold, set a-shimmer by a frothing surge of tiny glinting bubbles. A prominent architecture of damp limestone and chalk frames beguiling notes of roasted lemon, spiced pear and lightly candied quince and ginger, buoyed by a lithe and animated texture heightened by crisp acidity. From mid-palate back through the finish, the mineral element becomes more pronounced, though that influence only augments this Champagne’s essential crystalline purity and intensity. 12 percent alcohol. I loved this Champagne’s liveliness and elevation. (A local purchase.) Excellent. About $40.

Imported by Vintus LLC, Pleasantville, N.Y.
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bonny doon sparkling albarino
Rare is the occasion when I’m called upon to mention the albariño grape in the same line as sparkling wine, but leave it to Randall Grahm, the indefatigable leader of Bonny Doon Vineyard to explore such an option. Made in the Champagne method of second fermentation in the bottle — now called the “traditional method” outside of Champagne because of EU regulations — the Bonny Doon Sparkling Albariño 2010, Central Coast, offers a mild gold hue and moderate through very pretty effervescence. (This product is finished with a bottle cap, so be careful when you open it.) When first broached, this Sparkling Albariño seems delicate, a creature of soft wings and tender threads, but a few minutes in the glass bring out distinct elements of roasted lemon, baked pineapple and caramel apple, with a back-note of candied citron. It’s quite dry, slightly funky and earthy in a loamy way, and sports a finish that’s savory, bracing and saline. 12.5 percent alcohol. Production was 617 cases. If you have any of this on hand or find a bottle to purchase, by all means try it, but drink up; I think it has reached the distance of its range. Very Good+. About $36.

A sample for review.
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