I write so much about cabernet sauvignon wines from Napa Valley — collectively they form a sort of irrevocable juggernaut — that I thought it might be appropriate to touch on a cabernet from a different area in California. The Broadside Cabernet Sauvignon 2014, Paso Robles, derives from two sub-AVAs in that Central Coast region, Santa Margarita Ranch and Estrella District. The wine matures for 14 months in neutral French and American oak barrels; winemaker Brian Terrizzi generally eschews the use of new oak. The color is dark ruby-purple with a vivid magenta rim; it’s a real “plums and roses” cabernet, bursting with ripe, fleshy red and blue fruit scents and flavors with after-thoughts of rose petals, lavender and graphite. Ripe and fleshy yes, even spiced and macerated, but not blowsy or bosomy, because the wine maintains a steady ferrous line of vibrant acidity and dusty tannins for structure. A few moments in the glass bring out notes of sage and boxwood, cranberry and blueberry, briers and brambles, and the fruit and mineral drenched finish features a core of espresso and mocha. The alcohol content is a sensible 13.5 percent. Drink now through 2018 to 2020 with burgers, steaks, braised short-ribs and other hearty food of that ilk. Very Good+. About $18, representing Real Value.

A sample for review.

The Reichsgraf von Kesselstatt Josephshöff Riesling Kabinett 2012 derives from one of the german 2smallest crops in Germany’s Mosel region in 30 years. A small crop, however, though inevitably leading to smaller production, can also imply more concentration and intensity, certainly true of this shimmering, glistening wine. The color is moderate pale gold; scents of white pepper, mango, spiced pear and baked apple unfold to whiffs of fennel, quince and ginger, layered with notes of damp limestone and flint. It’s a completely lovely and complex wine, silky and supple, slightly creamy, as befits the ripeness of its fruit, yet lithe and dynamic, in sync with its bright acidity and scintillating limestone minerality. Above all, it’s a golden wine, faintly honeyed despite its dry character, replete with the aura of yellow fruit and meadow flowers, and finishing with exotic spice and a fillip of pink grapefruit. 11 percent alcohol. Drink this exquisite riesling, which should darken and burnish with age, through 2020 to 2022, properly stored. Think pork tenderloin, roasted veal shoulder, trout amandine, grilled sausages. The estate dates to 1349. Excellent. About $23.

Imported by Valckenberg international, Tulsa, Okla. A sample for review.

Looking for pure refreshment and delight at a low price? Aren’t we all! In terms of a wine ugniblanc-gperfectly suited to quaffing during the Summer season, look for a perennial favorite in the current vintage, the Domaine du Tariquet “Classic” 2015, from France’s Côtes de Gasgogne region in the Southwest. The wine, made in stainless steel and offering a very pale gold hue, is an interesting blend of 45 percent ugni blanc grapes, 35 percent colombard, 10 percent sauvignon blanc and 10 percent gros manseng. Ugni blanc, by the way, is the grape usually called trebbiano in Italy; it is also, somewhat improbably, the mainstay of Cognac and Armagnac production. Yes, greatness can come from humble origins. Anyway, this charming wine delivers fresh-mown hay and dried thyme in the nose, along with uplifting notes of lime peel and grapefruit and hints of anise and lilac. It’s quite dry, even bone-dry — I said it first! — and sifted with layers of limestone and flint, being savory and saline as well as slightly grassy and leafy on the palate. Touches of citrus are spare and lithe and jazzed by vivid acidity. 10.5 percent alcohol. Drink through the end of this year as a lively aperitif or with just about anything you set out on the hors d’oeuvres tray or take from the picnic basket. Very Good+. About $10, a Terrific Value.

Robert Kacher Selections, New York. (Robert Kacher was acquired by Domaine Select Wine & Spirits in November 2015.) A sample for review.

There’s no better time to drink Champagne or sparkling wine than anytime it happens to be that you feel like it. I devote considerable space to those categories late in December and early in January in my annual “12 Days of Christmas with Champagne and Sparkling Wine” series, but why not do a mid-year survey? Though actually I will probably wish that I had saved some of these examples to use then. Oh well. Unless otherwise indicated — most of the Champagnes included today were purchased locally — these products were samples for review. All except one were made in the traditional Champagne method of second fermentation in the bottle. A couple from Italy should attract the eye of bargain-hunters. Drink up! Enjoy! Be careful!
Champagne Breton Fils “Tradition” Brut nv. 12.5% alc. 1/3 each chardonnay, pinor noir, pinot meunier. Pale straw-gold hue; a beautiful upward surge of tiny swirling silver bubbles; a bit loamy and musky; baked apple, peach, almond skin; toasted hazelnuts and a touch of toffee; dense and almost chewy in texture, impressive heft and presence; heather and salt marsh, quince and ginger, slightly honeyed in effect but quite dry; arrow-straight acidity midst limestone and chalk minerality. Excellent. About $60, a local purchase.
Imported Heritage LLC, Corona, Calif.
Champagne Canard-Duchêne Brut Rosé nv. A lovely color that blends pale onion skin with smoky topaz and delicately tarnished silver; a froth of glinting tiny bubbles; a spare, elegant brut rose Champagne, all steel, smoke and limestone, offering wisps of strawberry and tangerine, orange zest and almond skin, with a hint of pear, heather and lightly buttered cinnamon toast, all ensconced in a lovely, light, lithe effervescent texture. No great depth, but plenty of substance and pleasure. Very Good+. About $46, a local purchase.
Imported by Thiernot USA, San Rafael, Calif.
cleto rose
Cleto Chiarli Brut Nero Rosé nv, Emilia Romagna, Italy. 12% alc. 100% grasparossa grapes. Made in the cuve close method. An entrancing light-coral-cotton-candy-pink hue; very dry but foams through the mouth like a cloud of ripe raspberries and strawberries; notes of fresh biscuits, almond skin and gardenia; a touch of rose petals; fleet acid structure with a hint of flinty minerality. Nothing to worry your pretty little head about, my dear, just drink up and be glad you’re alive. Very Good+. About $15, marking Good Value.
Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif.
Champagne Forget-Brimont Premier Cru Brut nv. 40% each pinot noir and pinot meunier, 20% forgetchardonnay. Pale pale gold color, enlivened by an incessant stream of incandescent bubbles; roasted lemon, lemon balm and spiced pear; if platinum had a scent of smoke and steel, this Champagne would be it; lovely body and mouth-feel; lush and creamy but cut by keen acidity and limestone minerality; brings up notes of buttered toast and brioche with a hint of cloves; lip-smacking acidity and a mineral edge. Excellent. About $45.
Imported by HB Wine Merchants, New York.
laurent demi
Champagne Laurent-Perrier Demi-Sec nv. 12% alc. 50% chardonnay, 35% pinot noir, 15% pinot meunier. “Demi-Sec” means “half-dry,” in other words, sweet (in varying degrees), but this elegant and majestic example feels just a shade sweeter than a typical brut-style Champagne, a factor revealed in a slightly riper fashion of citrus and stone-fruit. Pale gold hue, enlivened by a plethora of energetic tiny bubbles; hints of peach, pear and tangerine, a touch of spice cake; creamy on the palate but cut by vivid acidity and a dynamic limestone and chalk element; a bone-dry finish, all bracing seashell salinity and minerality. Excellent. About $45.
Laurent-Perrier USA, Long Island City, New York.
La Valle Primum Brut nv, Franciacorta, Lombardy, Italy. 12.5% alc. Chardonnay, pinot nero, pinot bianco, aged two years on the lees in bottle. Very pale gold color; lovely and exuberant effervescence; heather, lemon balm, spiced peach and baked apple; notes of fresh bread and brioche, limestone and steel; quite dry but ripe and juicy; brings in hints of jasmine and roasted lemon; gets pretty toasty on the finish. Very Good+. About $40.
A Leonardo LoCascio Selection, Winebow Group, New York.
barone 2
Barone Pizzini Bagnadore Riserva 2008, Franciacorta, Lombardy, Italy. Half and half chardonnay and pinot noir; this zero dosage-style sparkling wine spent five years on the lees. 1,356 cases. Lustrous pale gold; freshly baked bread and brioche, smoke and steel, toasted almonds and almond skin, quince and ginger; very dry, heaps of limestone and flint, bracing acidity and salinity; touches of toffee and lightly buttered cinnamon toast; high-toned and elegant with real depth of character. Drink through 2018 to 2022. Excellent. About $60.
A Leonardo LoCascio Selection, Winebow Group, New York.
Barone Pizzini Naturae Edizione 2011, Franciacorta, Lombardy, Italy. 12% alc. 70% chardonnay, 30% pinot noir. Also a zero dosage style sparkling wine, it spends 30 to 40 months on the lees. Pale pale platinum blonde; a great froth of yearning bubbles; every aspect of lemon — roasted lemon, lemon balm, lemon drop, preserved lemon — with spiced pear, toasted hazelnuts and lightly buttered brioche; wreathes of smoke, limestone and flint, energized by vivid acidity; wholly balanced and integrated but exciting and a bit feral. Drink through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $45.
A Leonardo LoCascio Selection, Winebow Group, New York.
brut premier
Champagne Louis Roederer Brut Premier nv. 12% alc. 40% pinot noir, 40% chardonnay, 20% pinot meunier. Pale straw-gold animated by lively effervescence; fresh-baked biscuits, toasted hazelnuts, roasted lemons and spiced pears, hint of jasmine; very crisp and clean, displaying exquisite poise in bridging lushness and creaminess with spare elegance and incisive acidity and crystalline limestone minerality; brings in notes of cloves and ginger, smoke and steel. Excellent. About $50, a local purchase.
Imported by Maisons Marques & Domaines USA, Oakland, Calif.
Rotari Brut Rosé nv, Trento, Italy. 12.5% alc. 75% pinot noir, 25% chardonnay. You might think width="250"at the price that this winsome sparkling wine, made in the traditional method — it spends two years on the lees in the bottle — would be no more than a kissy-face little crowd-pleaser, but it offers more character than you would suspect. Very pale salmon-copper color; relentlessly effervescent; blood orange, raspberry, almond skin; sea-shell, limestone and a hint of peach; very dry, tending toward austere on the finish, but brings up hints of rose petals and macerated strawberries. Very Good+. About $15, representing Real value.
Prestige Wine Imports, New York.
Steorra Brut nv, Russian River Valley. 12.2% alc. 55 percent chardonnay, 45 percent pinot noir. This is the first sparkling wine made by Joe Wagner, for his Copper Cane Wines & Provisions. Wagner created the immensely popular Meiomi label, which he sold last year to Constellation for a staggering $315 million. The color is a very pale straw-gold hue, enlivened by a fine, energetic bead; spiced pears and roasted lemons, delicate and subtle, with notes of quince and ginger, buttered toast and caramel; it’s quite dry, loaded with chalk and limestone minerality, a bit savory and saline, nicely balanced between creaminess and brisk acidity; the flaw is a finish that falls a little short. Very Good+. About $23.
Sterling Vineyards Brut 2012, Carneros. 12.3% alc. (No mention of this product on the winery’s website, no tech info, no image. Perhaps it doesn’t really exist.) Pale gold shimmering with a hail of tiny bubbles; very clean and fresh, spiced pear and roasted lemon, hints of smoky heather and hay; steel, flint, almond skin; charming and scintillating, elegant and energetic; very dry, with a firm yet attractive element of limestone minerality that surges through the chiseled finish. Excellent. About $50.

Last night, LL made a fabulous stir-fry with shrimp, snow-peas, red bell pepper and jalapeno. She made a broth from the shrimp shells and a bunch of vegetables and also gently heated canola oil in a small pan with chopped garlic and ginger and some red pepper flakes. Then she marinated the shrimp in that oil. After the stir-frying, she used the broth to thicken the sauce. The result was deep and wonderful flavors and textures. Of course we wanted a white wine, Mt Beautiful Riesling 2015 Ftsomething that would balance the hint of spicy heat emanating from the red pepper flakes and jalapeno, so I opened a bottle of the Mt. Beautiful Riesling 2015, from New Zealand’s North Canterbury region. Made all in stainless steel, this riesling exudes freshness and immediate appeal, while just a suggestion of off-dryness in the entry provided an appropriate foil for the spiciness of the dish. The color is very pale gold; lovely aromas of pears and green apples are touched with notes of lychee, peach and jasmine, cloves and white pepper, and a few minutes in the glass bring in hints of tangerine, lime peel and roasted lemon, all of these elements perfectly integrated. The segue onto the palate is seamless, and from mid-course back through the finish the wine feels bone-dry, animated by chiming acidity and scintillating limestone minerality. A wine with the word “beautiful” in the name better live up to its billing; this one, golden and glittering, certainly does. 11.5 percent alcohol. Production was 1,100 cases. Drink now through 2019 to ’20. Excellent. About $22.

A sample for review.

Cabernet sauvignon is the king of grapes in the Napa Valley, but let’s not neglect that other “sauvignon” known as sauvignon blanc. In fact, if it were not for the marriage, so to speak, of cabernet franc and sauvignon blanc in the 18th Century, Bordeaux might be a series of wind-swept forests between the Atlantic Ocean and the Gironde River and Napa valley still the purview of 2014 Romb_SB_f+b_v5walnut and plum orchards. Yes, world-class wines based on the cabernet sauvignon grape are endemic now to Napa Valley, but the region and its sub-AVAs also produce some of the world’s best sauvignon blanc wines. One of those is today’s featured wine, the Rombauer Vineyards Sauvignon Blanc 2015, Napa Valley, a 100 percent varietal wine made 90 percent in stainless steel tanks, 10 percent in neutral French oak barrels, “neutral” meaning the barrels were used for so many vintages that their wood influence is almost subliminal, more in terms of gently shaping the wine’s texture and structure rather than asserting a definite woody-spicy-vanilla thumbprint. The color is very pale gold with a faint light green cast; pungent aromas of lime peel, grapefruit, lemongrass and celery seed are highlighted by notes of jasmine, almond skin and tangerine, with a pert hint of flint and limestone in the background. On the palate, the wine is sleek, elegant and steely but not austere, and its soft talc-like sensation is animated by brisk acidity and a scintillating edge of limestone minerality. It’s quite dry but feels pleasantly ripe with lemon, nectarine and lime flavors that lead to a supple finish of heather and grapefruit; right at the slightly leafy and figgy core, there’s a pure singing drop of currant. 14.2 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2017 or ’18. Director of viticulture and winemaking at Rombauer is Richie Allen. Excellent. About $24.

A sample for review.

The Bisol Crede Brut is consistently one of the best Prosecco sparkling wines to come from that region in the Veneto. The designation is Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore, the hillside location — Valdobbiadene — being one of the prime vineyard areas for the glera grape. This is a blend of 85 percent glera, 10 percent pinot bianco and five percent verdiso grapes. It was made in the Charmat or autoclave method of second fermentation induced in stainless steel tanks. The vintage — 2014 — is indicated in small type on the back label. The color is very pale gold, animated by a whirling swarm of tiny glinting bubbles. This sparkling wine is all smoke and steel, green apples and pears, with notes of acacia and heather and a snap of flint. It’s very dry, offering a lithe limestone-flecked structure that chimes with bright acidity and a finish that’s vibrant with sea-shell minerality and salinity. 11.5 percent alcohol. Tasty and elegant together. Excellent. About $25.

Vias Imports, New York. A sample for review.

If the Ferraton Père et Fils Samorëns 2015, Côtes du Rhône blanc, is available in your samorens2015lneighborhood, buy it by the case now for drinking through the Summer. A blend of 60 percent grenache blanc grapes and 40 percent clairette — the latter a white workhorse of a grape in the South of France that must be cultivated and utilized carefully — and “elevated,” as the French say, in large vats with no malolactic fermentation, this extremely attractive wine offers appeal on every level. The pale gold hue leads to aromas of roasted lemons, spiced pears and yellow plums infused with notes of bee’s-wax and lanolin, jasmine and honeysuckle; a few moments in the glass bring out tantalizing hints of fennel, cloves and figs. On the palate, the wine is supple and spare, quite dry yet crystalline with ripe golden fruit flavors buoyed by bright acidity, while the finish pulls in more spice and a lick of limestone minerality. 13.5 percent alcohol. Remarkable personality and character for the price. Drink through 2017 as a pleasing aperitif or with grilled salmon and swordfish, seafood salads and risottos and various forms of picnic fare. Excellent. About $14, a Wonderful Value.

Imported by HB Wine Merchants, New York. A sample for review.

So, here we are, in the 11th segment of “Whither Napa Valley Cabernet,” a series devoted to exploring the many aspects of the cabernet sauvignon wines created in the various regions of the Napa Valley. It’s a question worth asking, since, as readers will see in today’s selection of 12 examples, the cabernet wines from this legendary area and its sub-AVAs, can vary from an austere Old School character to the new style of very ripe — or over-ripe — fruit and plush textures. Most of the models in today’s post hew to the old-fashioned style of emphasis on structure, but a couple of them are over-the-top for my palate. These are mostly from 2012, with a couple of ’13s and one from 2011. Except for one wine encountered at a wholesale trade tasting, these wines were samples for review.
bv private
I tasted the Beaulieu Vineyards Georges De Latour Private Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Napa Valley, last November at a wholesale distributor’s trade event. This great and historic label had a difficult period in the first decade of the 21st Century, but made a real effort under the direction of world-famous (and extremely busy) consultant Michel Rolland. If the 2012 is a pertinent example, the winery (owned by Diageo) is hitting on all cylinders again. The color is an obsidian-like, brooding dark ruby-purple; it’s a cool, chiseled, graphite and granite-based amalgam of power and elegance energized by swingeing acidity — call it the Lafite-Rothschild of Napa Valley — and as taut and tense a cabernet as I have encountered. Tannic? Oh, yes, but tannins that seem as generous and supple as they are sinewy and chewy. The blend is 93 percent cabernet sauvignon, 4 percent petit verdot and 3 percent malbec. Oak regimen was 22 months, 90 percent new French barrels. The alcohol is a soaring 15.5 percent, by far the highest in this roster of a dozen cabernets. Try from 2018 or ’20 through 2030 to ’36. Excellent. About $135.
The Cornerstone Cellars Michael’s Cuvée Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Napa Valley, is named for Michael Dragutsky, a doctor in Memphis who is one of the winery’s founders. It’s a blend of 91 percent cabernet grapes and nine percent merlot; I have no information about the oak regimen. The color is ruby that is dark unto opacity; a broad pungency of intense black currants and plums infused with tapenade, fig paste and roasted fennel, graphite and lavender, iodine and iron characterizes the complex and beautifully integrated bouquet. Likewise, the wine is broad and deep and dense on the palate, though it flows like a lithe and supple source of power and elegance; fathomless, dusty, cushiony tannins support concentrated black fruit flavors poised over tremendous reserves of forest and loam. 14.9 percent alcohol. Production was under 250 cases. Drink from 2017 or ’18 through 2028 to ’32. Exceptional. About $75.
The grapes for the Far Niente Cabernet Sauvignon 2013, Oakville District, derive primarily from the Martin Skelling Vineyard, planted in 1978 and located just behind the winery in Oakville. The wine is a blend of 97 percent cabernet sauvignon and 3 percent petit verdot; it aged 17 months in French oak, 77 percent new barrels. Winemaker was Nicole Marchesi. The color is very dark ruby-purple with a magenta cast; this feels like classic Oakville, with its bastions of iodine and iron, graphite, cedar and lead pencil and notes of plums, black cherries and currants touched with dried thyme and rosemary — with the latter’s hint of branchy astringency — and roasted fennel. The structure is like taut muslin, fresh and snappy, full of energy. On the other hand, the wine delivers a chiseled, hard-edged character in its dusty chewy tannins that take on a velvety quality. A few minutes in the glass bring in touches of ancho chili and bitter chocolate, and the finish grows increasingly austere. 14.5 percent alcohol. Try from 2018 or ’20 through 2030 to ’32. Excellent. About $155.
The Flora Springs Trilogy 2013, Napa Valley, is a blend of 87 percent cabernet grapes, seven 2013_trilogy_labelpercent petit verdot and 6 percent malbec; it aged 22 months in French oak, 60 percent new barrels, 40 percent one-year-old. Winemaker was Paul Steinauer. The color is an opaque ruby-purple, black at the center; aromas of pure and intense cassis, blackberry and raspberry are permeated by notes of cloves and sandalwood, lavender and licorice, mint and eucalyptus, with iodine and loam in the background, all contributing to a pleasing balance of the exotic and the earthy. It’s a dry, large-framed cabernet whose dusty velvety tannins fuse with an indisputable oak foundation driven by vibrant acidity, all of these elements keenly balanced but needing some time to unfurl to higher usefulness. 14.2 percent alcohol. Try from 2018 or ’19 through 2028 to ’32. Excellent. About $80.
Galerie 2012 Pleinair Cabernet
Winemaker Laura Diaz Muñoz aged the Galerie “pleinair” Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Napa Valley, 18 months in 58 percent new French oak barrels. The unforgettable color is deep ruby-purple with a thermonuclear violet-magenta rim; it’s a large-framed, dense, chewy and minerally cabernet but neither ponderous nor obvious, carrying its elements of graphite, iodine and iron, spiced and macerated black currants, raspberries and plums with pinpoint focus and fervent poise. This cabernet is mouth-filling without being plush or ostentatious, made vivid with bright acidity and a chiming tannic-mineral structure. A few minutes in the glass bring up hints of lavender and licorice driving into a long deep finish that’s dry and furnished with granitic minerality, making for an effect that’s chaste, spare and strangely elegant. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink from 2018 or ’20 through 2028 to ’30. Excellent. About $50.
The Grgich Hills Estate Yountville Selection Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Napa Valley, derives from 11CSYT_FRONT_NO-ALCvines planted in 1959. The wine is a blend of 82 percent cabernet grapes, 14 percent petit verdot and 4 percent merlot; it aged 23 months in French oak, 80 percent new barrels. The color is an intense and warm dark ruby hue with a tinge of magenta at the rim; it’s all about structure now, filled with wheatmeal and walnut shell elements, loamy and briery, and it opens cautiously, a heavy old volume whose pages turn very slowly or, from another aspect, a block of oak buffed and burnished by sandalwood sandpaper. Velvety tannins are pumped up with notes of graphite and granite dust, while a few minutes in the glass bring in hints of plum pudding and fruitcake, lavender and bitter chocolate. 14.1 percent alcohol. Production was 772 cases. Try from 2018 or ’20 through 2030 to ’32. Excellent. About $185.00, yes, per bottle.
The “Allomi” tier is the entry-level cabernet sauvignon for The Hess Collection; a less expensive example falls under the cheaper “Hess Select” rubric. So, the Hess Collection Allomi Cabernet Sauvignon 2013, Napa Valley, displays a dark ruby hue, shading to a tinge of mulberry; it offers rich black currant-cherry-raspberry scents and flavors permeated by graphite, iodine and iron, lavender and black licorice. Plush, dusty tannins have roots in underbrush and foresty elements, while ripe and spicy black fruit flavors are spicy and savory. 14.4 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2019 or ’20. Very Good+. About $30.
On the “shop” page of the winery’s website, The Hess Collection Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Mount Veeder, is described thus: “Nothing is quite so luscious as blueberries framed by hints of vanilla, cassis, creamy milk chocolate caramel and oak spice.” Gack, thank god, that’s not the character that emerged from my tasting; had that been the case, I would have given this one a definite thumb’s-down. Granted, this wine — 80 percent cabernet sauvignon, 20 percent malbec and aged 20 months in 80 percent new French oak barrels — feels ripe and rich, but the ripeness and richness of black and red currants and raspberries are balanced by tannic elements of mineral dust, graham and wheatmeal and a touch of walnut shell, and the wine is far more intense and concentrated than the unhelpful notation quoted above implies. It’s quite dry, substantial, dense and inky, with graphite minerality and dark, oaken polish. The wine finishes with a high note of wild cherry. 14.6 percent alcohol. Drink through 2022 to ’26. Director of winemaking for Hess Collection is Dave Guffy. Excellent. About $60.
Lüscher-Ballard Wine is a project of Christina Lüscher-Ballard and Carroll Ballard, married labelformer filmmakers who own a tiny property, 2,200 feet high on Spring Mountain. John Kongsgaard makes the wine. The Lüscher-Ballard Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Spring Mountain District, fermented with native yeast and aged 22 months in French oak barrels. The color is dark ruby with a black center and a faint mulberry rim; it’s a majestic wine, freighted with massive elements of iron and iodine, graphite, cedar and tobacco, with hints of old leather, dried rosemary and ancho chili, and high-notes of lavender and bitter chocolate. On the palate the wine combines density and weight with airiness and elegance, though tannins need a few years to recede from a feral state. Fruit? Of course, in the range of spiced and macerated black currants and plums with a cast of red fruit overall. Altogether, lovely balance and integration of every element. 14.1 percent alcohol. Production was about 200 cases. Try from 2018 or ’19 through 2030 to ’32. Excellent. About $80.
Brothers Charles and Stuart Smith deserve a Nobel Prize for consistency and integrity. Making sm_label_lr_cab_12their Smith-Madrone wines using the same methods every year and allowing the vintage to speak through the grapes, they produce chardonnay, riesling and cabernet sauvignon wines on Spring Mountain that embody ideals of realism, individuality and location. Produced from 40-year-old, dry-farmed vines and aged 18 months in French oak barrels, the Smith-Madrone Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Spring Mountain District, is a blend of 82 percent cabernet sauvignon grapes, 10 percent merlot and eight percent cabernet franc. The color is dark ruby from stem to stern; notes of dried sage and rosemary, briers and brambles, cedar and tobacco leaf are etched on intense elements of ripe and dried black currants, raspberries and blueberries, all balanced on a well-oiled vehicle of graphite and granitic minerality. On the palate, the wine is — no surprise — lithe and sinewy, bolstered by dusty, slightly velvety tannins and vibrant acidity. The finish is long and lean and laden with chiseled flint-like minerality. 14.2 percent alcohol. Production was 1,815 cases. Drink through 2028 to ’32. Excellent. About $48, the bargain of this group.
Established in 1943 and producing its first vintage in 1952, Stony Hill Vineyard, on Spring Mountain, is still operated by the McCrea family. It says something about loyalty and tradition that Mike Chelini has been making the wines since 1972. A specialist in non-malolactic, all-neutral-oak, long-aging chardonnay, the winery — probably the least known of Napa Valley’s Old School producers — only began making cabernet sauvignon wines in 2009, and it’s not surprising that the Stony Hill Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Napa Valley, mirrors the philosophy that governs its chardonnays; this is not a cabernet for consumers looking for the glamorous or the gorgeous. The wine aged 18 months in oak barrels and 18 months in bottle before release. The color is dark ruby shading to medium ruby at the rim; aromas of black currants, raspberries and blueberries are intense and concentrated, permeated by notes of lead pencil, rosemary and cedar, briers, brambles and loam. Tannins feel deep, rooty and dusty, and an aura of wood-smoke pervades the whole vibrant, resonant, chiseled package. An eminently sensible 13.5% alcohol. Production was 430 cases. Try from 2017 or ’18 through 2028 to ’32. Excellent. About $60.
Young Inglewood winery touts this initial release as an “instant crowd pleaser,” but the Venn Cabernet Sauvignon 2013, Napa Valley, did not please me all that much; everything about it, except for the moderate alcohol level, blares “contemporary Napa Valley” in the glass. The color is very dark ruby-purple shading to a glowing magenta rim; the nose draw up scents of ripe cassis, vanilla, cloves, blueberry jam, lavender, graphite and mocha, while on the palate the wine is rich and succulent, ferrous and sanguinary and framed by heaps of charcoal and graphite.
14.3 percent alcohol. Production was 209 cases. If this is a crowd-pleaser, I’ll drink alone, thank you. Very Good. About $50.

The Leyda Valley lies just off the Pacific Ocean on Chile’s central coastal region, 62 miles west of Santiago. It’s a cool, breezy climate, ideal for sauvignon blanc and pinot noir, the primary grape varieties grown there. A new label, Aila, exploits those possibilities in a pair of moderately priced wines. Today, we look at the Aila Sauvignon Blanc 2015, Leyda Valley, made completely in stainless steel, and indeed there’s something of steely vibrancy about the wine that makes it attractive and drinkable. The color is the palest of pale straw-gold hues; it’s notably grassy, displaying hints of pea-shoot, heather, timothy and new-mown hay, enmeshed with lime peel, grapefruit and gooseberry and a high-toned snap of gun-flint. The wine flows with jaunty vivacity across the palate, displaying pert citrus and stone-fruit flavors touched with a sunny, leafy fig element that reveals a fillip of juicy currant at the center. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2017 with fresh shell-fish, ceviche, sushi or grilled shrimp, also light seafood pasta and risotto. Very Good+. About $15.

Imported by Guarachi Wine Partners, Woodland hills, Calif. A sample for review.

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