Italian families like Parducci, Pedroncelli and Sebastiani added immeasurably to the development of the California wine industry, particularly in Sonoma County. (And of course Mondavi in Napa Valley.) Today’s Wine of the Week comes from Pedroncelli, family-owned since 1927; ; winemaker is John Pedroncelli. Over the course of its existence, the winery has been noted for red wines, of which the Pedroncelli “Mother Clone” Zinfandel 2011, Dry Creek Valley, is a delicious example. “Mother Clone” refers to the winery’s home vineyard, replanted in the 1970s using original budwood and featuring grapes from some of the vines remaining from 1904. The wine spent a year aging in American oak barrels and includes 10 percent petite sirah grapes. The color is dark ruby with a mulberry tinge at the rim. The bouquet is exactly as racy, as briery, brambly and peppery as you want from a well-proportioned zinfandel that includes notes of wild blueberries, black currants and plums; the wine is gently but persuasively framed by oak and slightly chewy tannins and enlivened by brisk acidity and clean graphite minerality, all going to support tasty, spicy blackberry and black currant flavors touched by hints of lavender and licorice. 14.8 percent alcohol. We drank this wine with a hearty pizza; it would also be appropriate with roasted or braised meat dishes, pork chops with a Southwestern rub or burgers and steaks. Now through 2015 or ’16. Very Good+. About $17, representing Excellent Value.

A sample for review.


Jake and Ben Fetzer are the grandsons of Barney Fetzer, who founded his well-known eponymous winery in Mendocino County in the late 1960s. The family sold the winery and its brands to Brown-Forman in 1992; that company sold Fetzer and related labels to Vina Concha y Toro, the large Chilean producer, in 2011 for a reported $238 million. The brothers, now third generation grape growers and winemakers, have their own label and produce, at least so far, in a winery converted from an old redwood barn, only one bottling of pinor noir. Masút, we are told, means “dark, rich earth,” but we are not informed from which — I assume Native American — language the word derives. People! Details count! Still, I liked their Masút Vineyard and Winery Pinot Noir 2012 quite a bit.
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The Masút Vineyard and Winery Pinot Noir 2012, Mendocino County, offers a lovely medium ruby-magenta color. The wine aged 10 months in French oak barrels, 33 percent of which were new. Bright aromas of black and red cherries carry hints of cranberry and pomegranate and undertones of briers, brambles and clean loam; the whole effect is of freshness and immediacy yet paying a debt to the earth. Flavors run to cherries and plums, wrapped in an elegant satiny texture and enlivened by pert acidity; a few moments in the glass deepen the mineral and loamy aspects and add notes of plums and graphite and a strain of lightly dusted tannins in the finish. 13.9 percent alcohol. Production was 2,450 cases. Drink now through 2016, maybe ’17. Excellent. About $40.

A sample for review.
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The Artesa Pinot Noir 2012, Carneros, hails from a winery founded in the late 1980s by the Raventos family, owners of the giant Codorniu sparkling wine producer in Spain. Originally, the winery turned out a range of sparkling wines, but by the late 1990s, the intention shifted to still wine, particularly chardonnay and pinot noir, yes, natural components in sparkling wine and Champagne, as well as cabernet sauvignon and sauvignon blanc. The winery’s name was changed to Artesa — “handmade,” as in artisan; it has not abandoned bubbles entirely, offering a Codorniu Napa Grand Reserve sparkling wine. Director of winemaking at Artesa is Mark Beringer, whose pedigree includes being the great great grandson of Jacob Beringer, a founder of the venerable winery that bears his name, and a long, successful stint as winemaker at Duckhorn. The Artesa Pinot Noir 2012, Carneros, aged nine months in French oak barrels, 30 percent of which were new, and that seems just right to me. The color is brilliant ruby-magenta, neither too dark nor too light. Enticing aromas of cloves, cinnamon and sassafras, spiced and macerated black cherries and plums, and notes of leather, loam and graphite waft from the glass. The texture is both sinewy and satiny, with brisk acidity cutting a swath on the palate, highlighting ripe and slightly exotic-tasting black cherry, mulberry and plum flavors; oak offers a rounded, buffed shape to the wine, while staying discreetly in the background. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $25.

A sample for review. Image from vindulgeblog.com.

So, tomorrow’s the Big Day, a Super Bowl with lots of spindly Roman numerals, and manly men and their womanly women with gather in front of giant television screens, as once our distant ancestors gathered around protective campfires, to watch the display of sportsmanship, athletic skill, mayhem and commercials. And, of course, chow down on all sorts of food that we understand is super-comforting but super-bad for us. I cast no aspersions; I merely offer a few red wines to match with the hearty, deeply sauced and cheesy, rib-sticking, finger-lickin’ fare. These wines display varying levels of power and bumptiousness but not overwhelmingly tannins; that’s not the idea. Rather, the idea is to stand up to some deeply flavorful snacks and entrees with which most people think they are obligated to drink beer, but it’s not so. I provide here brief reviews designed to capture the personality of each wine with a minimum of technical, historical and geographical folderol. With the exception of the Sean Thackrey Sirius 2010, which I purchased online, these wines were samples for review. By the way, I recommend opening most of these examples about the time that Renee Fleming launches into “The Star-Spangled Banner”; they’ll be ready to drink by half-time.
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XYZin Old Vine Zinfandel 2011, California. 14.5% alc. Medium ruby color; plums and fruitcake, black cherries, blueberries, note of lightly candied pomegranate around the circumference; a highly developed floral-fruity-spicy profile; very dry, dense and chewy, freighted with dusty, slightly woody and leathery tannins, but robust and lively in a well-balanced and tasty way; not a blockbuster and all the more authentic for it. Now through 2015. Chicken wings, pigs in blankets, baby-back ribs. Very Good+. About $16.
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Vina Robles “Red” 2011, Paso Robles, San Luis Obispo County, California. 14.5% alc. Blend of syrah, petite sirah, grenache, mourvedre; winery does not specify percentages. Dark ruby color, almost opaque at the center; intense and concentrated; black cherries and plums, oolong tea, a little tarry and infused with elements of briers and brambles, gravel and graphite; dry grainy tannins, vibrant acidity (I thought that my note said “anxiety,” but I knew that wasn’t right); long spice-packed finish. A dense yet boisterous red for pizza and chili. Very Good+. About $17.
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Bonny Doon Contra Old Vine Field Blend 2011, Contra Costa County, California. 13.5% alc. A blend of 56% carignane grapes, 28% mourvedre, 9% grenache, 6% syrah, 1% zinfandel. Dark ruby color, tinge of magenta; robust and rustic, heaping helpings of ripe blackberries, blueberries and plums with notes of pomegranate and mulberry and hints of lavender and pomander; graphite-brushed tannins make it moderately dense, while pert acidity keeps it lively. Cries out of cheeseburger sliders and barbecue ribs. Very Good+. About $18.
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Paolo Manzone Ardi 2012, Langhe Rosso, Piedmont, Italy. 13/5% alc. 60% dolcetto d’Alba, 40% barbera d’Alba. Production was 300 cases; ok, so you can’t actually buy this, but I would make it my house red if I could. Brilliant medium ruby color; black cherry and plum, dried spice and potpourri, rose petal and lilac, but, no, it’s not a sissy wine; taut acidity and deep black and red fruit flavors; dry underbrushy tannins, lithe, almost muscular texture, graphite minerality flexes its muscles; sleek, stylish, delicious. Now through 2016. Very Good+. About $18.
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Poliziano Vino Nobile di Montepulciano 2010, Tuscany, Italy. 14% alc. 85% sangiovese grapes, 15% colorino, canaiolo, merlot. Dark ruby color, lighter magenta rim; dried black cherries and currants, smoke, cloves, tar and black tea; dried spice and flowers, foresty with dried moss, briers and brambles, really lovely complexity; plush with dusty tannins, lively with vivacious acidity; terrific presence and personality. Now through 2016 or ’17. Venison tacos, pork tenderloin. Excellent. About $26.
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Allegrini + Renacer Enamore 2011, Mendoza, Argentina. 15% alc. 45% malbec, 40% cabernet sauvignon, 10% bonarda, 5% cabernet franc. This wine is a collaboration between the important producer of Valpolicella, in Italy’s Veneto region, and the Argentine estate where the wine is made, but in the dried grape fashion of Amarone. It’s really something. Dark ruby color with a deep magenta rim; tons of grip, dense, chewy, earthy, but sleek, lithe and supple, surprisingly generous and expansive; black fruit, dried herbs, plums, hint of leather; earthy and minerally but clean and appealing; a large-framed, durable wine, dynamic and drinkable, now through 2019 to ’21. With any animal roasted in a pit you crazy guys dug in the backyard just for this occasion. Excellent. About $26.
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Sean Thackrey Sirius Eaglepoint Ranch Petite Sirah 2010, Mendocino County, California. 15.1% alc. Opaque as motor oil, with a violet sheen; blackberries and blueberry tart, hints of lavender, potpourri, bitter chocolate and pomegranate; a few minutes in the glass bring in notes of spiced plums and fruitcake; ripe, dense, chewy, dusty but not o’ermastered by tannin, actually rather velvety, exercises its own seductions; alert acidity, depths of graphite minerality. Now through 2018 to 2020. Chili with bison, venison, wild boar. Excellent. About $40.
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d’Arenberg The Ironstone Pressings GSM 2009, McLaren Vale, South Australia. 14.5% alc. Production was 300 cases (sorry). 67% grenache, 26% shiraz, 7% mourvedre. Radiant medium ruby color; “ironstone” is right, mates, yet this is a beautifully balanced and integrated wine with real panache and tone; plums and black currants, hint of red and black cherries; dust, graphite, leather, slightly gritty grainy tannins; earth and briers, granitic minerality but a core of bitter chocolate, violets and lavender. Carnitas, chorizo quesadillas, barbecue brisket. Now through 2018 to ’20. Excellent. About $65.
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Perhaps you seared a fillet of salmon or tuna crusted with pepper for a simple dinner, served (again perhaps) with rice, a green vegetable and lemon wedges for squeezing over all. Here’s a terrific inexpensive accompaniment, the Dry Creek Vineyard Fumé Blanc 2012, Sonoma County. David Stare founded the winery in 1972, a few years after Robert Mondavi created the name Fumé Blanc, modeled on the Loire Valley’s Pouilly-Fumé region where the sauvignon blanc grape reigns supreme. Sauvignon blanc wasn’t selling as a varietal wine in the United States, and Mondavi thought that “fumé blanc” might entice consumers to try it. He was right. One finds both names in California, with some producers, including Dry Creek Vineyard, making a fumé blanc and a varietally-labeled sauvignon blanc. There was a tendency, in those days, to make a fumé blanc wine — “smoky white” — in a supposed Loire Valley style, while sauvignon blanc wines were made in a supposed white Bordeaux fashion, often with some semillon blended in and a bit of oak-aging; those modes even extended to the bottle shape, but such distinctions disappeared years ago. Anyway, the Dry Creek Valley Fumé Blanc 2012, made all in stainless steel, offers a pale straw-gold color and fresh clean aromas of lemongrass and celery seed, lime peel and grapefruit pith, with notes of green pea and thyme and hints of lilac and lavender. Pretty attractive stuff. Lemon and grapefruit flavors are highlighted by touches of mown grass, caraway and limestone in a bright thread that travels down a line of vibrant acidity. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink through the end of 2014. Very Good+. About $14, representing Great Value.

A sample for review.

Wine attracts us by its color and seduces us with its aromas. It’s true that some wines, whites in particular, can be too aromatic, almost cloyingly so. This can happen with torrontes wines from Argentina, with viognier-based wines and occasionally with riesling. What I offer today are six white wines that excel in the aromatic bouquet area, as well as gratifying in flavor and body, easy in the alcohol department and being ever-so-helpful price-wise. Chardonnay figures only as a minority component in one of the wines, and sauvignon blanc occurs not at all. Primarily these are easy-drinking and charming wines, even delightful, and they may give you a foretaste of the Spring that most of the country so desperately longs for, even California, where it’s already an exceedingly, even dangerously dry Summer. As usual, these brief reviews do not touch upon the educational aspects of geography, history, climate and personnel matters for the sake of immediacy. Enjoy!

These wines were samples for review.
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Tenuta Sant’Antonio Scaia 2012, Veneto, Italy. 12.5% alc. Gargenega 60%, chardonnay 40%. Pale gold color; super-floral, with notes of jasmine and camellia; lemon, yellow plums, hint of candlewax; very dry, with a seductive, almost talc-like texture but cut by shimmering acidity and a touch of limestone minerality. Lovely quaff. Drink up. Very Good+. About $11, a Fantastic Bargain.
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Dry Creek Vineyard Chenin Blanc 2012, Clarksburg, California. 12.5% alc. Very pale gold color; hay and straw, heady notes of jasmine and gardenia, roasted lemon and yellow plum; slightly leafy, with a hint of fig; very dry, almost chastening acidity and chalk-flint elements; but quite lively and engaging; tasty and charming. Buy by the case for drinking through 2014. Very Good+. About $12, a Terrific Bargain.
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Mulderbosch Chenin Blanc 2011, Western Cape, South Africa. 13.5% alc. An inexpensive chenin blanc that’s almost three years old? Never fear; this one is drinking beautifully. Shimmering pale gold color with faint green tinge; tell-tale note of fresh straw under quince, honeysuckle, lemon drop and lemon balm and a hint of cloves; brisk and saline, earthy, almost rooty, deeply spicy with a touch of briers; and quite dry. Impressive presence and tone. Drink through the rest of 2014, into 2015. Excellent. About $14, and Worth a Search.
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Eccoci White 2011, Girona, Spain. 13.3% alc. Roussanne 50%, viognier 30%, petit manseng 20%. Utterly unique. Medium gold color; a striking bouquet of roasted fennel, damp straw and lilac, with undertones of limestone, orange blossom, peach and pear; very stylish, sleek and elegant, with macerated and spiced citrus flavors, though clean and fresh and appealing; bracing acidity and a burgeoning limestone quality provide backbone, but this is mainly designed for ease and drinkability. Drink through the end of 2014. Excellent. About $20.
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Luca Bosio Roero Arneis 2012, Piedmont, Italy. 13% alc. 100% arneis grapes. Pale yellow-gold; peach and pear, hint of some astringent little white flower, some kind of mountainside thing going on; baking spice and mountain herbs; salt marsh and seashell; roasted lemon with a note of pear; starts innocently and opens to unexpected heft, detail and dimension. Now through 2015. Excellent. About $20.
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Trisaetum Estate Dry Riesling 2012, Ribbon Ridge, Willamette Valley. 11% alc. Medium gold-color; roasted peach and spiced pear, mango and lychee, hint of rubber eraser or petrol (a good thing in riesling), a subdued floral element; lithe, supple, energetic, you feel its presence like liquid electricity on the palate; lithic and scintillating, brings in grapefruit rind and limestone through the dynamic finish. Faceted and chiseled, exciting. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $24.
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Chester Osborn, fourth generation owner and chief winemaker for d’Arenberg, in South Australia’s McLaren Vale, decided that for 2010 he would bottle a separate shiraz wine (and three grenache) from each of the 12 vineyards that contribute to his top “iconic” wine, The Dead Arm Shiraz. The point was to celebrate and emphasize the concept that different ages of vines, variations in soil and sub-soil types, difference in the geological lie of the land, the aspect and exposure — all elements in the notion of terroir — would produce wines of different character. I tasted nine of those 12 very limited edition shiraz wines and found that each one, while generating true syrah/shiraz qualities, exhibited a varying sense of detail and dimension. Primarily what they share is tremendously dense and sizable structures and, in some cases, nearly impenetrable tannic and mineral qualities; they’re wines made for the long haul.

Australia doesn’t hold a patent on strange and colorful names for wine labels, but that continent surely can lay claim to jump-starting the trend, with the irrepressible Chester Osborn taking a good deal of the blame. I won’t explain the flamboyant names of the separate vineyards represented here, though each label, traversed by the signature d’Arenberg red stripe, has a tale to tell. Osborn himself is depicted in pixie fashion on each image, complete with his trademark curly blond locks and loud shirts.

I’ll offer these brief notices in alphabetical order. All of these McLaren Vale shiraz wines received an oak regimen of 20 months in new and old French barriques and old American barrels. Production for each was 200 six-pack cases; price per bottle is $85.

Imported by Old Bridge Cellars, Napa, Calif. Samples for review. Image of Chester Osborn from thedrinksbusiness.com
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d’Arenberg The Amaranthine Shiraz 2010. 13.8% alc. 44-year-old vines. Plot is 3.3 hectares (8.3 acres), loamy sand on limestone. Deep rich ruby color; tar and leather, briers and brambles; black cherries and plum pudding, very spicy; dense and chewy, freighted with velvety tannins and graphite minerality; the mineral and oak elements increase on the finish. Try 2015 through 2020. Excellent.
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d’Arenberg The Bamboo Scrub Shiraz 2010. 13.9% alc. 18-year-old vines. Plot is 1.5 hectares (3.9 acres), sandy loam on sand. Dark ruby-purple color; deeply fragrant, fruity (black and blue fruit) and spicy; also densely tannic and earthy; very ripe though, fleshy, slightly macerated, yet boldly structured, austere and a little demanding; great vibrancy and resonance. Try 2015 or ’16 through 2020 to ’25. Excellent.
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d’Arenberg The Blind Tiger Shiraz 2010. 14.1% alc. 87-year-old vines. Plot is 2.4 hectares (6.1 acres), sandy loam on sand. Deep opaque ruby color; ripe and fleshy plums, black berries and black currants, spiced in a compote; very intense and concentrated yet among the most balanced and integrated of these shiraz wines; woody spice, almost exotic, dusty graphite and stacked-up tannins enlivened by blazing acidity. A huge wine but nothing austere. Try 2015 or ’16 through 2020 to ’24. Excellent.
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d’Arenberg The Garden of Extraordinary Delights Shiraz 2010. 14% alc. 42-year-old vines. Plot is 2.4 hectares (6.1 acres), sandy loam on sand. Deep ruby-purple color, magenta rim; perhaps not extraordinarily delightful but certainly a wine of enticing floral and spicy aromas wafting over its abyss of tannin and granitic minerals; very intense and concentrated black and red fruit but nicely knit and balanced for a highly structured wine. Try from 2015 through 2020 to ’22. Excellent.
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d’Arenberg J.R.O. Afflatus Shiraz 2010. 13.9% alc. 102-year-old vines. Plot is .5 hectares (1.28 acres), sandy loam on limestone and clay; one of the original plantings on land that Joseph Rowe Osborn acquired in 1912. Dark ruby color; very spicy and very floral with heaps of graphite and granitic minerality; blueberries and lavender; ripe, fleshy and meaty; tapenade and potpourri; but all tightly wound around flinty tannins and some wood influence. Best after 2016 or ’17 through 2022 to ’25. Excellent.
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d’Arenberg The Little Venice Shiraz 2010. 14.2% alc. 15-year-old vines, the youngsters of this group. Plot is 3.6 hectares (9.25 acres), heavy loam on heavy clay. Very dark ruby-purple color; plums and black currants inlaid with graphite, lead pencil, cedar and iron filings; quite dry with grainy dusty tannins and pronounced earthiness. A bit too cabernet-like. Try 2015 through 2020 to 22. Very Good+.
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d’Arenberg The Other Side Shiraz 2010. 14% alc. 96-year-old vines. Plot is 2.2 hectares (5.6 acres), clay, sand and loam on limestone and clay. Dark dark ruby color, almost ebony; piercing minerality and swingeing tannins; leather, briers and brambles; intense core of graphite, potpourri, violets and bitter chocolate; spiced and macerated red and black fruit, notes of black tea, vanilla and cloves; tremendous presence, tone and resonance. Try 2016 or ’17 through 2025 to ’28. Exceptional.
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d’Arenberg Shipster’s Rapture Shiraz 2010. 14.2% alc. 43-year-old vines. Plot is 1.5 hectares (3.9 acres), sandy loam on limestone. Dark ruby color with a magenta rim; a big hit of woody tannins, scintillating granitic minerals and intense and concentrated red and black fruit; earth and underbrush, tough as iron, dense austere finish. Try 2015 or ’16 through 2020 to ’24. Very Good+ with perhaps Excellent potential.
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d’Arenberg Tyche’s Mustard Shiraz 2010. 14% alc. 17-year-old vines. Plot is 4 hectares (10.28 acres), loamy clay on limestone. If any of these blockbuster wines can be said to be beautiful (while densely sizable), this is the one. Deep ruby-purple color; plums, black currants, blueberries; violets and bitter-chocolate-covered cherries; leather, smoke and graphite; very earthy with notes of moss and mushrooms; but the whole package, while very granitic and concentrated, is sleek, polished and almost paradoxically elegant; long finish brings in some austerity. Try 2016 or ’17 through 2024 to ’28. Exceptional.
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You know how the synergy thing goes: great food, the wine that turns out to be perfect…Bingo! Such a moment occurred last Saturday on Pizza-and-Movie Night, as with a terrific guanciale-green olive-basil-and-radicchio pizza I opened a bottle of the Teunta Sant’Antonio Monti Garbi Ripasso 2010, Valpolicella Superiore, from the Veneto region in northeast Italy. “Monti Garbi” is the Castagnedi family’s estate vineyard. The wine is composed of 70 percent corvina and corvione grapes, 20 percent rodinella and 10 percent croatina and oseleta, all traditional grapes of the Valpolicella area. “Ripasso” refers to the technique of refermenting the young wine on the pomace of the previous year’s more full-bodied and typically higher alcohol Amarone. Aging — usually 15 or 16 months for this wine — is accomplished in 500-liter tonneaux barrels, about twice the size of the standard French barrique; 30 percent of the barrels are new. What’s the result? A robust red wine of medium ruby color and a seductive bouquet of dried spice, dried flowers and dried black and red fruit, with notes of pomegranate and plums; try to imagine a pomander with potpourri, your grandmother’s spice box, macerated black and red cherries and a dose of smoky oolong tea and you get some idea of what I mean. Matters turn a bit more serious, mouth-wise, as the wine exercises its dry, slightly chewy tannins, its swingeing acidity — which contributes liveliness, buoyancy and freshness — and its graphite-tinged minerality, none of which detract from juicy ripe dark cherry and plum flavors (with a hint of sour cherry and orange rind) and rollicking spice. 14 percent alcohol. This was great with the pizza and would also be a treat with hearty pasta dishes and grilled or braised meat or a lunch of salami, olives and dry cheeses. Now through 2017 to 2020. Very Good+. About $19.

Imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif. A sample for review.


Including not merely a roster of pinot noir wines from California but a pinot meunier made as a still wine — it mostly goes into Champagne and sparkling wine — and two pinot gris/grigio wines, one from northeast Italy, the other from Sonoma County’s Russian River Valley. As usual in these quick reviews, ripped, as it were, from the fervid pages on my notebooks, I eschew the available range of technical, historical, geographical and personal (or personnel) detail to concentrate on immediacy and my desire to pique your interest and whet your palate. Enjoy!

These wines were samples for review.
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Ascevi Luwa Pinot Grigio 2012, Collio, Italy. 12.5% alc. Pale straw-gold color; winsome aromas of hay and almond blossom, saline and savory; roasted lemon, spiced pear; a little briery; very dry, crisp and chiseled but appealing moderately full body and texture; a far more thoughtful pinot grigio than one usually encounters. 1,500-case production. Excellent. About $19.
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MacMurray Ranch Pinot Gris 2012, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. 15% alc(!). A Gallo label. Medium gold color; jasmine and honeysuckle, lemon and lemon balm, baked pear, all very spicy and intricately woven; attractive supple texture and bright acidity, but you feel some alcoholic heat on the slightly unbalanced finish. Very Good. About $20.
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La Crema Pinot Noir 2012, Monterey County. 13.5% alc. Jackson Family Wines. Medium ruby-violet color; black cherries and currants, cloves, tobacco and sassafras, hint of brown sugar; earthy and loamy, moss and mushrooms; very dry but satiny and supple, with tasty black fruit flavors; the oak comes up a bit in the finish, along with some graphite-tinged minerality. Now through 2016. Very Good+. About $23.
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La Crema Pinot Noir 2012, Sonoma Coast. 13.5% alc. Jackson Family Wines. Lovely limpid ruby-magenta color; sour cherry and melon, pomegranate, cranberry and cloves, develops a hint of smoke and black cherry; lovely and limpid, again, in the mouth, flows like satin across the palate but enlivened with keen acidity; notes of earth and brambles. Drinks very nicely but doesn’t have the heft that La Crema pinot noirs typically display. Now through 2015. Very Good+. About $25.
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La Rochelle Pinot Noir 2009, Sonoma Coast. 14.9% alc. 326 cases. Enrapturing ruby-magenta color; a lithe and supple pinot noir that takes 45 minutes to loosen up a bit; cranberry and cola, dried cherries and raspberries; cloves and allspice, fairly exotic; buoyed by bright acidity and slightly bound by oak and tannin. Now through 2015. Very Good+. About $42.
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La Rochelle Deer Meadows Vineyard Pinot Noir 2010, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County. 14.3% alc. 235 six-pack cases. A real beauty. Lovely medium ruby-plum color; black and red cherries, pomegranate and pomander, oolong tea, sassafras and beetroot, slightly earthy and loamy, yes, the whole panoply of sensation; a few moments bring in notes of iodine, mint and graphite; very dry, dense, almost chewy, quite notable tannins for a pinot noir but well-managed and integrated; gathers power and paradoxical elegance in the glass. Now through 2016 to ’18. Excellent. About $75.
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La Rochelle Saralee’s Vineyard Pinot Meunier 2012, Russian River Valley. 13.9% alc. 866 cases. Pinot meunier is primarily grown as a minority component in Champagne and sparkling wine production. Entrancing transparent ruby-magenta color with a clear rim; delicate, dry, slightly raspy in the sense that raspberries and their leaves can be raspy; black and red cherry compote, spiced and macerated, with a subtle element of dried fruit, flowers and spices; damask roses, note of violets; dust, earth, a touch of loam, enlivened by swingeing acidity that plows a furrow. Now through 2016. Oddly Excellent. About $38.
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Liberty School Pinot Noir 2012, Central Coast. 13.5% alc. The first pinot noir from this label known for well-made and moderately priced cabernet sauvignon. Makes sensible claims and meets them: Medium ruby color; black cherry and plum, hints of rhubarb and tart mulberry; smoke and cloves; reasonably supple texture; a little merlot-ish overall, though. Very Good. About $20.
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MacPhail Family Wines “The Flyer” Pinot Noir 2011, Green Valley of Russian River Valley. 14.1% alc. Medium ruby-magenta color; quite intense and concentrated for pinot noir, ripe and vivid black and red cherries, smoke, cloves; vibrant acidity cuts a swath, it’s very satiny but with a tannic and oaken core that ramps up the power and somewhat masks the varietal character. Still, it makes an impression. Very Good+. About $59.
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Rodney Strong Pinot Noir 2012, Russian River Valley. 14.5% alc. Medium ruby color; pungently spicy and floral, notes of tobacco and coffee bean, cranberry, pomegranate and rhubarb; black cherries with a briery, mossy undercurrent; very satiny, drapes over the palate as it flows; fairly deep and dark aura for pinot noir, with a graphite element and resolutely spicy with cloves and sandalwood, moderately dense tannins. Quite a package. Now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $25.
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When I first started trying a lot of wines in the early 1980s, among the most impressive were zinfandels and petite sirah wines from Fetzer Vineyards, launched when Barney Fetzer, who bought acreage in Mendocino County, released a zinfandel and a cabernet sauvignon from the 1968 vintage. Fetzer expanded hugely over the years and was in the forefront of several movements, for example, organic farming on the one hand, white zinfandel on the other. The family sold the winery and its brands to Brown-Forman in 1992; that company sold Fetzer and related labels to Vina Concha y Toro, the large Chilean producer, in 2011 for a reported $238 million. The wine under consideration today is the Five Rivers Pinot Noir 2012, Santa Barbara County; Five Rivers is a Fetzer brand that was created in the early 2000s. I will say right here that the Five Rivers Pinot Noir 2012 is one of those wines that performs above its station in life. The color is dark ruby with a magenta rim; enticing aromas of black cherries and plums, pomegranate and cola are woven with hints of cranberry and sassafras and traces of smoke, leather and loam. The texture is lovely, lithe and supple and handily supports real presence and personality; vivid black and red fruit flavors are highlighted by touches of cloves and cinnamon, lively acidity and a moderate element of graphite minerality. It’s true that this wine falls a tad short in the finish, but in every other respect it’s worthy of My Readers’ attention. You could sell the hell out of this wine in restaurant by-the-glass programs. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2015. Very Good+. About $15, representing Great Value.

A sample for review.

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