One of the seemingly natural pairs in terms of wine type, grapes and geography is chardonnay and pinot noir. Doubtless such a perception stems from the conjunction of chardonnay and pinot noir in their Ur-home, their cradle, their altar, in Burgundy’s Cote d’Or. It’s the terroir, stupid, a small narrow stretch of low, southeast-facing hills upon which nature, climate and geology have, with mindless yet carefully calibrated precision, wrought exactly the gradations, exposure, drainage, top soil and under-girding layers, wind and weather — the latter being the wild card — to produce some of the world’s legendary vineyards and finest, rarest wines. It’s not surprising, then, that growers and winemakers in other regions of the world consistently seek to emulate that pairing of these grapes.

No place else is Burgundy, of course, so no area can hope to duplicate exactly the terroir or the conditions that prevail there. In Oregon’s Willamette Valley, for example, the pinot noir grape performs beautifully among those verdant hills and dales, while chardonnay — not that there’s not good chardonnay — is gradually giving over to pinot blanc, pinot gris and riesling. Many regions in California are amenable to chardonnay and pinot noir: Anderson Valley, Russian River Valley, Sonoma Coast, Carneros, Santa Lucia Highlands, Santa Maria Valley and other smaller and more isolated areas produce splendid examples of each. It’s not surprising that large producers include both types of wines in their rosters or that small-scale wineries sometimes specialize in just the two.

Today’s post inaugurates a series in which I will be looking at the chardonnay and pinot noir wines of producers in California, sometimes individually, occasionally in groups. There’s a good chance that My Readers have not heard of Gallegos Wines. The close-knit family released its first wines only last year, but its roots in Napa Valley — figuratively and literally — go back three generations. The wine industry in California could not exist without the labor of the Mexicans and Mexican-Americans who work in the vineyards and wineries, plant and then tend the vines and grapes through all stages of growth. Increasingly, many of those workers with ties to the land and the industry are starting to make wine too, enough that there’s now a Mexican-American winemakers organization.

Ignacio Gallegos came to California from Michoacan in the 1940s and settled in St. Helena, in Napa Valley, in the mid-1950s. His son, Ignacio II, and grandsons, Eric and Ignacio III, worked in vineyard management and gained the renown that enabled them in 2007 to finally establish their own vineyard management company. Having worked in many of the valley’s finest vineyards, having their own company and with Eric and Ignacio III completing college and courses in viticulture and winemaking, it seemed inevitable that the family would draw on these resources and the grapes from the Rancho de Gallegos estate in the Rutherford bench area, owned by Ignacio II’s brother Maurilio. Gallegos Family Wines produces about 1,000 cases; in addition to the chardonnay and pinot noir reviewed here, there’s a sauvignon blanc, with merlot, petite sirah and cabernet sauvignon coming soon.

These wines were samples for review. Image of Eric, Ignacio II and Ignacio III by Tom Stockwell for the Napa Valley Register.
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The Boekenoogen Vineyard is one of my favorite vineyards in Santa Lucia Highlands, and the family that owns and farms the land produces terrific wine from it. The Gallegos Boekenoogen Vineyard Pinot Noir 2012, Santa Lucia Highlands, is a reflection of the greatness of that land. The color is a limpid medium ruby with mulberry undertones; this is exquisite, evanescent, transformational pinot noir that features slightly fleshy aromas of red currants and cherries flecked with mulberries, violets and rose petals, cloves, allspice and sassafras, and notes of rhubarb with briers and brambles for an earthy element; all amounting to perhaps the most alluring and definitive bouquet on a pinot noir that I have encountered this year. The division of oak is 25 percent new French barrels and 75 percent neutral, though I was not informed about the length of aging; I venture to say not excessive, because the oak influence here is subliminal, a subtle and supple shaping force. The texture is delightfully sleek and satiny, supporting smoky black and red cherry and currant flavors that take on a bit of loam and leathery earthiness through the finish; well-knit and integrated tannins round off the package. Alcohol content is 14.8 percent. Production was 250 cases. Drink now through 2016 to ’18. Excellent. About $42.
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The Charmer Vineyard, owned by Ed Beard Jr. and located in the heart of the Yountville AVA, was planted by Ignacio Gallegos and his brothers more than 30 years ago, so they know it well. They produced 125 cases of the Gallegos Charmer Vineyard Chardonnay 2012, Yountville, Napa Valley, a wine that sees only 25 percent new French oak barrels and underwent 25 percent malolactic, the natural chemical transformation that turns sharp malic acid into milder and creamier lactic acid; the result is a chardonnay that retains bright acidity and is not a creamy-butter bomb, while maintaining a lithe, supple almost talc-like texture. The color is pale gold; no denying the richness, in aromas and flavors, the slightly caramelized pineapple and grapefruit with top-notes of jasmine, mango and cloves, but elements of flint and damp gravel and a crisp exhilarating character keep it honest and true. 14.4 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $29.
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You couldn’t ask for a more appealing quaffer in a white wine than the Bila-Haut 2013, Côtes du Roussillon Blanc, from the stable of Michel Chapoutier. Roussillon, the sunniest spot in France, nestles against the eastern slopes of the Pyrenees, just across from Spain, which nestles against the western flanks. Indeed, the region of Roussillon, ruled by the kings of Majorca and then Aragon centuries ago, shares a heritage that makes it almost more Spanish than French, including a tradition of bull-fighting. This wine is a blend of grenache blanc grapes, grenache gris, vermentino (here called rolle) and macabeo (known in Spain as viura); it offers a very pale gold color and winsome aromas of jasmine and almond blossom, spiced pear and yellow plum with a hint of peach, and notes of ginger, quince and flint. Mildly spicy stone-fruit flavors are highlighted by savory, briny qualities that balance nicely on a stream of pert acidity and a gently lush texture; a strain of limestone minerality plays out through the spare, almost elegant finish. 13.5 percent alcohol. We drank this wine quite happily with seared coho salmon and a mixture of sauteed bok choy and red peppers. Now through 2015. Very Good+. About $13, representing Great Value.

R. Shack Selections, HB Wine Merchants, New York. A sample for review.

First, I apologize to the people at Dolce Wines, a sister winery to Far Niente, Nickel & Nickel and EnRoute, for holding on to these samples for so long before tasting and writing about them, but I wanted to see how a few years in the fridge would affect them. The examples in question are Dolce 2007, 06, 05 and 04, dessert wines in half-bottles, and what they reveal across four years is a remarkable and gratifying consistency in tone, structure, flavor profile and balance. Differences? Of course, and I will discuss those variations in more detail further in this post.

The partners in Far Niente conceived of the project — a small winery devoted to a single dessert wine — in 1985; the first vintage introduced commercially was 1989, released in 1992. The production of dessert wine depends on geographical and climatic conditions — foggy, with a subtle balance between warm and cool — suitable for the inoculation of the botrytis mold, the “noble rot,” that can attack grapes, suck out the moisture and reduce them to concentrated sugar bombs. This invasion occurs grape by grape, not cluster by cluster, so harvesting a vineyard affected by botrytis can take several weeks and many passes through the rows. Because of the vagaries of weather, botrytis doesn’t occur every year or it may happen in a scattered and spotty fashion, so those vintages do not result in wine. The practice is tedious, time-consuming and expensive, and great attention must be paid to detail in the vineyard and winery. The 20-acre Dolce vineyard is in Coombsville, east of Napa city, at the base of the Vaca Mountains, in an area where fog often lingers until midday, encouraging the growth of the homely but beneficial mold. The Dolce dessert wines evince a great deal of power, typically built on a base of super-ripe and seemingly roasted peaches and apricots and building other aspects of detail and dimension as the vintage dictates; their grace comes from what feels like fathomless acidity and limestone minerality that offers exquisite balance to the immense ripeness and richness. These are world-class dessert wines.
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Dolce 2007, Napa Valley. This blend of 82 percent semillon grapes and 18 percent sauvignon blanc aged 31 months in all-new French oak barrels. The residual sugar is 12.5 percent. Color is medium gold with a faint green highlight; I could smell the roasted peaches and apricots when I poured the wine into the glass. What other elements? Creme brulee, hazelnuts and almond skin, hints of mango and papaya, notes of mandarin orange and pineapple. This is, in other words, a very sweet wine, in the mouth viscous and satiny, spiced and macerated, rich, honeyed and buttery, yet electrified by vibrant — I almost wrote “violent” — acidity, so the whole musky, dusky package resonates with liveliness and frank appeal. Alcohol content is 13.5 percent. Drink now through 2025 to 2027. Excellent. About $85 a half-bottle.
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Dolce 2006, Napa Valley. For 2006, Dolce contains the most sauvignon blanc of this quartet, 20 percent against 80 percent semillon. It aged 31 months in all-new French oak barrels. Residual sugar is 13 percent, the highest of this group. The color is radiant medium gold; the bouquet is pungently smoky, ripe with creamy honeyed peaches and apricots enlivened with cloves and sandalwood, hints of coconut and pain perdu. It’s smooth as silk on the palate, round, dense and viscous, with undertones of orange marmalade, preserved lemon, lime peel and cinnamon toast; clean acidity ramps up the vibrancy and resonance, creating a finish that’s almost dry and bursting with limestone minerality. Alcohol content is 13.8 percent. Drink now through 2026 to 2030. Excellent. About $85 a half-bottle.
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The word for Dolce 2005, Napa Valley, is “otherworldly.” The blend is 90 percent semillon, 10 percent sauvignon blanc; again the oak regimen is 31 months, all-new French oak barrels; the residual sugar is 12 percent. King Midas would envy this golden richness, but this example of the wine is not only rich and ripe but elegant, almost delicate; that’s a paradoxical quality, though, because this elegance and sense of delicacy encompass sumptuous notes of roasted peaches and apricots, caramelized mango, pineapple upsidedown cake, exotic spices, all wrapped in a creamy, honeyed texture that manages to be both sophisticated and feral. The lithe, supple finish, charged with vivid acidity and scintillating limestone minerality, is the driest of this group. Alcohol content is 13.8 percent. Drink now through 2025 to 2030. Exceptional. About $85 a half-bottle.
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It’s interesting that Dolce 2004, Napa Valley, embodies the highest alcohol level of this quartet — 14.1 percent — and, logically, the lowest residual sugar at 10.8 percent; a notion of sauvignon blanc that’s almost subliminal, at 1 percent; and the least time in the typical all-new French oak barrels, 28 months, still a considerable span, of course. The color is pure shimmering gold; aromas of peach tart and apple turnover, deeply caramelized citrus and stone fruit, feel elevating and balletic, yet this is the earthiest of these wines, the one most imbued with limestone and flint minerality, all a shade darker in smoke and the redolence of toasted Asian spices. Still, it’s rich and ripe — slightly over-ripe — and, as is essential, brightened by an arrow of rigorous acidity that aims straight for the dry, uplifting finish. Drink now through 2020 to 2024. Excellent. About $85 for a half-bottle.
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All sorts of reasons exist to justify our interest in wine — wine tastes great, on its own and with food; wine is a complicated beverage that encourages thought and contemplation; wine gets you drunk — and one of those reasons is the story behind the wine. Now not all wines have compelling stories. The cheap wine fostered in vast vineyards in California’s Central Valley and raised in giant tanks on megalithic farms generally does not offer a fascinating back-story. And financially-padded collectors don’t suck up cases of Chateau Latour and Haut Brion because of the histories of those august properties.

This pair of rosé wines, however, tells one of those tales of a dream long-striven for and finally accomplished. When I mention that the wines derive from the Cotes de Provence appellation in the South of France by a couple who never made wine before, My Readers may rise to their feet and let loose a chorus of “Brad and Angelina!” but no, I am not speaking of the (excellent) celebrity rosé Miraval, now in its second vintage, but of the slightly older Mirabeau, the brain-child of Stephen Cronk, an Englishman who gave up his job in telecommunications and house in Teddington in southwest London — motto: “We’re in southwest London!” — and moved his family to the village of Contignac in Provence for the purpose of growing grapes and making rosé wines. Cronk did not possess the fame, notoriety, influence and fiduciary prowess of the Pitt/Jolie cohort, but he did manifest a large portion of grit, married, inevitably, to naivete. (This is also a great-looking family; they could be making a ton of dough in commercials. Image from the winery website.)

Cronk discovered that he couldn’t afford to purchase vineyard land, even at the height of the recession, so he settled for being a negociant, buying grapes from growers that he searched for diligently and with the help and advice of Master of Wine Angela Muir. Five years after he began the process, his Mirabeau brand is sold in 10 countries and is now available in two versions in the U.S.A.

Mirabeau “Classic” Rosé 2013, Côtes de Provence, is a blend of grenache, syrah and vermentino grapes that offers an alluring pale copper-salmon color and enticing aromas of fresh strawberries and raspberries with hints of dried red currants and cloves and a barely discernible note of orange rind and lime peel. The wine slides across the palate with crisp vivacity yet with a touch of lush red fruit in a well-balanced structure that includes a finishing element of dried herbs and limestone. 13 percent alcohol. A very attractive, modestly robust rosé for drinking with picnic fare such as cold fried chicken, deviled eggs, cucumber sandwiches — or a rabbit terrine with a loaf of crusty bread. Very Good+. About $16.

The Mirabeau Pure Rosé 2013, Côtes de Provence, is a different sort of creature. A blend of 50 percent grenache, 40 percent syrah and 10 percent vermentino, this classic is elegant, high-toned and spare, delicate but spun with tensile strength and the tension of steely acidity. The color is the palest onion skin or “eye of the partridge”; hints of strawberry and peach, lilac, lime peel and almond skin in a texture that practically shimmers with limestone and flint minerality; rather than lush, this is chiseled, faceted, a gem-like construct that still manages to satisfy in a sensual and exhilarating measure. 13.5 percent alcohol. We drank this over several evenings as an aperitif while cooking and snacking. Excellent. About $22.

Seaview Imports, Port Washington, N.Y. Samples for review. Bottle image by Hans Aschim from coolhunting.com.

Just six weeks ago I made the Flora Springs Chardonnay 2012, Napa Valley the Wine of the Week, and, darn it, I can’t help but put the Flora Springs Soliloquy Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc 2013, Oakville, in the same spot today. The grapes derive from a two-block proprietary vineyard in Napa Valley’s Oakville District AVA, and, in fact, the vineyard receives more prominent display on the label than the grape variety does. Is that device helpful to consumers? Probably not, but it makes for a very elegant and typographically balanced label, one that matches the balance and elegance of the wine. Thoughtful work by winemaker Paul Steinauer puts the wine through seven months in a combination of concrete and stainless steel tanks, oak barrels and steel drums, the result being a sauvignon blanc of unusually appealing texture, subtlety and suppleness, as well as being fresh and crisp. The color is very pale gold, almost invisible; aromas of apple peel and lime peel are woven with lemon balm and lemongrass and back-notes of celery seed, hay, fennel and thyme. Brisk acidity energizes what is otherwise a sleek and suave sauvignon blanc that encompasses stone-fruit and citrus flavors enmeshed with hints of cloves, freshly-mown grass and pink grapefruit. The finish engages the palate with a touch of grapefruit bitterness and an unexpected feral tang. 14.2 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2015 as a delightful aperitif or with grilled or roasted salmon or swordfish. Excellent. About $25.

A sample for review.

Today’s notes feature eight rosé wines, four from France, three from California and one from the state of Virginia. In style they range from ephemeral to fairly robust. I have to take shots at a couple of these examples, but those are the breaks in the realm of wine reviewing. No attempt at technical, historical, geographical or personal information here (you know, the stuff I really dote on); instead, the intent is to pique your interest and whet your palate. Except for the Calera Vin Gris of Pinot Noir 2013, these were samples for review. Enjoy!
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Chateau de Berne Terres de Berne Rosé 2013, Côtes de Provence, France. 13% alc. 50% each grenache and cinsault. Very pale onion skin hue, almost shimmers; light kisses of strawberry, peach and orange rind, hints of dried thyme; bone-dry, crisp and vibrant, loads of scintillating limestone minerality. Really well-made and enjoyable but packaged in an annoying over-designed bottle that’s too tall to fit on a refrigerator shelf. Excellent. About $20.
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Bila-Haut Rosé 2013, Pays d’Oc, France. 13.5% alc. Cinsault and grenache. (From M. Chapoutier) Pretty copper-salmon color; orange zest and raspberries, dusty minerals, notes of rose petals and lavender; quite dry, with limestone austerity, a fairly earthy, rustic style of rose, not in the elegant or delicate fashion. Very Good. About $13.
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Calera Vin Gris of Pinot Noir 2013, Central Coast. 14.7% alc. 466 cases. Bright copper-peach color; think of this as a cadet pinot noir in the form of a rosé; currants and plums, raspberry with a bit of briery rasp; notes of smoke and dried Provencal herbs, hints of pomegranate and orange zest; very clean, fresh and vibrant with a damp limestone foundation. Excellent. About $17.
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Dunstan Durell Vineyard Rosé of Pinot Noir 2013, Sonoma Coast. 13% alc. 92 cases. Light but bright copper-salmon-topaz hue; strawberries and red currants, both fresh and dried, blood orange, note of pomegranate; lovely, lithe and supple but energized by brisk acidity; floral element burgeons and blossoms in the glass, as in rose petals and camellias; very dry, delicate, ethereal yet with a real bedrock of limestone minerality; a touch earthier than the version of 2012. Excellent. About $25.
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Domaine de la Mordorée “La Dame Rousse” 2013, Tavel, France. 14.5% alc. 60% grenache, 10% each cinsault, syrah and mourvèdre, 5% each bourboulenc and clairette. Brilliant strawberry-copper color; strawberries, raspberries and red currants with a touch of peach; very dry and fairly robust for rosé; notes of dried herbs and summer flowers, dominant component of limestone and flint, almost tannic in effect, but overall high-toned and elegant. Excellent. About $30.
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Notorious Pink 2013, Vin de France. Alc% NA. 100% grenache. (Domaine la Colombette) Better to call this one Innocuous Pink. Carries delicacy to the point of attenuation; very pale onion skin color; faintest tinge of strawberry, bare hint of orange zest and limestone; fairly neutral all the way round. Comes in an upscale frosted bottle, woo-hoo. Good. About $20.
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Stinson Vineyards Rosé 2013, Virginia, USA. 12% alc. 100 percent mourvèdre. 120 cases. Ruddy onion skin hue; fresh strawberries and raspberries with cloves and slightly dusty graphite in the back; notes of orange pekoe tea and dried red currants; a little fleshy and floral; bright acidity and a mild limestone-like finish. Very Good+. About $18.
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Robert Turner Wines Mosaic Rosé of Pinot Noir 2013, Santa Lucia Highlands. 14% alc. With 15% cabernet franc. 25 cases. Pale copper-onion skin color; musky and dusky melon, raspberry and strawberry with notes of pomegranate and rhubarb; finely-knit texture, delicate, elegant, lively, with a honed limestone finish. Excellent. About $22.
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…might be called the Isabel Mondavi Deep Rosé Cabernet Sauvignon 2013, Napa Valley, and in case any of you winemakers out there are thinking, “What a great name! I think I’ll use ‘deep rose’ for my label,” there’s a little trademark symbol that protects the name from other use. Anyway, this is 100 percent cabernet sauvignon, from vineyards in the Altas Peak, Rutherford and Howell Mountain AVAs, made all in stainless steel after a long cool fermentation. The color is an entrancing medium ruby-magenta hue, a little darker and richer than the color of most rosé wines. The impressions are fresh and grapey, with notes of red currants and raspberries and a lift of just-cut Braeburn apple; hints of cranberry and rhubarb linger in the background. The freshness, bright berryish qualities and element of earthiness remind me of Beaujolais-Villages, particularly in the bouquet, but in body and dark spicy red and blue fruit flavors it feels like what in Bordeaux is called clairette, a wine that’s darker and exhibits slightly more heft than a Bordeaux rosé but is lighter than a “regular” cuvée. The combination of freshness, elegance and substance makes the Isabel Mondavi Deep Rosé 2013 a versatile match with all sorts of summertime fare. Alcohol level is a sane and manageable 13.2 percent. Winemaker for the Isabel Mondavi label is Rob Mondavi Jr. Drink now into 2015. Excellent. About $20.

A sample for review.

In June I spent three days in North Yuba, a sub-appellation of the Sierra Foothills, about an hour’s drive north of Sacramento, for a brief immersion into the situation of Renaissance Vineyard and Winery and the other wineries and properties in the area. The first task of my visit was devoted to a day-long tasting of RVW library wines, a fairly astonishing collections of thousands of bottles going back to the early 1980s. Not surprisingly, the winery would like to sell these wines, which themselves are a pretty astonishing reflection of quality, integrity and single-minded devotion to an ideal. The winery staff was quite open in its expectation for my visit and looked to me for recommendations about how to market these wines and for the direction RVW should take to make their products more appealing to consumers. This sort of consulting work is not typically the position I find myself in when visiting a vineyard and wine region, but I felt that I had to take these expectations seriously. Here, by the way, are links to my two-part posting on the tasting: Cabernet-based reds and White table and dessert wines.
(Image of Sierra Foothills counties from 1916, courtesy of quarriesandbeyond.org.)
How is the winery going to divest itself of this tremendous store of library wines dating back to the early 1980s? By conveying a sense of a narrative that focuses on the winemakers, the terroir of the property and the quality and character of the wines. It’s a truism of today’s wine market that consumers, especially under the age of 35, are attracted to wines that possess a back-story, whether it’s a unique history or location, whether there’s an interesting aspect to the personalities involved or to the winemaking process. To reach to the contemporary audience, Renaissance needs to do what it has never done in its almost 40-year chronicle: Hire an outside marketing agency to craft this narrative and package the wines for sale to a particular stratum of restaurants and retail outlets. The advantage for restaurants would be that they could offer aged wines on their lists without having to serve them before they’re ready to drink or store them for a decade, the latter a prospect that few restaurants have the space for or can afford. Imagine being able to recommend the Renaissance Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc 1989 or the Riesling 2002 or the Estate Cabernets from 1994, ’93 and ’91, all drinking perfectly now, to discerning palates.

This marketing agency could create, indeed with no embellishment, a fascinating narrative about a succession of fanatical winemakers dedicated to low alcohol content, little or no new oak, Old World techniques and organic methods. Imagine the appeal to collectors of a package that included cabernet-based wines from the 1980s, 90s and 2000s made by original winemaker Carl Werner; his wife Diana, who became winemaker when Werner died in 1988; and Gideon Beinstock, winemaker from 1994 to 2011, or of the winery’s late harvest dessert wines. The ability to taste such wines and compare them is invaluable. The fact that Carl Werner’s cabernets from years such as 1983 and 1984 are just coming round to a drinkable state, having shed their considerable tannins, creates a unique opportunity in California. It doesn’t hurt that Renaissance is located not in Napa Valley or Sonoma but in North Yuba in the Sierra Foothills, a region that may lack the glamor and recognition of better-known areas but offers the attraction and authenticity of laboring in obscurity and even a tinge of stubbornness.

A variety of ways exist through which a wine-savvy marketing agency could package and promote these wines to retailers and the restaurant trade, but Greg Holman, president of RVW, and his staff would have to be receptive to suggestions and new ideas and willing to make the financial outlay necessary.

And what about the future?

First, trim the line. RVW offers four cabernet sauvignon or cabernet-based wines — the “regular” cabernet sauvignon, a Reserve bottling, the Claret Prestige and the Vin de Terroir — and four Rhone-inspired red wines, a single-variety syrah and the blends La Provencal, Mediterranean Red and Granite Crown. Asking consumers to understand the differences among these wines and their motivations leads to confusion and indifference. Perhaps limiting these labels to a regular and reserve cabernet and one Rhone-style blend in addition to the syrah would clarify matters.

Second, engage in a major label revamp, another task for a marketing or design firm. Let’s face it, while the Renaissance label may be dignified, it’s also stodgy and bland. I don’t advocate changing a label design whenever the vagaries of fashion seem to dictate, and I admire wineries like Grgich Hills, for example, for staying with an uncluttered, elegant and easily identifiable label. The retention of the Renaissance label, however, feels more like habit than devotion, and I would say that it’s time for a shake-up. Keep the initial “R,” or a version of it, with its hint of antique finery, but clarify, simplify and modernize the rest.

Third, update the winery website with better graphic elements, a more compelling design, pictures of the winery and the estate, and, speaking selfishly, a section for Trade & Press where images and technical information can easily be obtained. A website and an active blog increasingly are part of a winery’s story.

Gewurztraminer might not be as off-putting to so many people if its name were changed to Steve or Samantha, but there it is, a grape that can be made into one of the most beautiful wines in the world with a name that is almost unpronounceable. So be it. Gewurztraminer thrives in Alsace, where France nestles uneasily against Germany, and to some extent in the northeastern Italian region of Alto Adige, in the Tyrol Alps just south of Austria. There are outposts in other countries, such as Australia and New Zealand, and also in the states of Oregon and California, and it’s to the latter that we turn for today’s Wine of the Week, the Gundlach Bundschu Estate Vineyard Gewurztraminer 2013, Sonoma Coast. The vineyard lies at a fairly low elevation in the southwestern foothills of the Mayacamas range. Ninety percent of this clean, fresh, crisp wine was made in stainless steel, the rest in neutral oak barrels. The color is very pale gold; aromas of rose petals, lychee and spiced pear are highlighted by notes of white pepper, peach and lime peel, all subtly and delicately woven. Acidity is essential to the success of gewurztraminer — as in any wine, truly — to balance the potentially overpowering floral and fruity elements, and this example has acidity in spades, a factor that contributes to its appealing liveliness and its deft poise. Citrus and stone-fruit meld seamlessly in the mouth, while the spicy, limestone-laced finish brings in a hint of grapefruit pith bitterness, savory, astringent and exciting. 14.3 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2019 to ’22 with — I know this is the cliche — moderately spicy Thai or Vietnamese cuisine, with grilled shrimp or mussels, with seafood risotto. Excellent. About $22.50.

A sample for review.

In the ancient Occitan language of the South of France, picho means “petit,” hence la pitchoune is a diminutive for “little one.” That’s the name that Julia Child and her husband Paul gave to the cottage they built in the village of Plascassier in Provence, now a cooking school. And that’s the name of a small-production winery, founded in 2005, that makes tiny amounts of wine from Sonoma Coast grapes. Winemaker and partner is Andrew Berge, and he turns out, at least in the samples I was sent, wines of wonderful finesse and elegance.
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The color of La Pitchoune Vin Gris of Pinot Noir 2012, Sonoma Coast, is vivid copper-salmon. A bouquet of slightly fleshy strawberries and raspberries opens to notes of watermelon, spiced tea and flint; this is bone-dry but juicy and tasty with raspberry, melon and dried red currant flavors, a rosé of nuance and delicacy enlivened by crisp acidity, a slightly leafy aspect and a finish drenched with damp limestone minerality. 14.2 percent alcohol. Production was 39 cases. I could drink this all Summer long. Excellent. About $30.
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La Pitchoune Pinot Noir 2012, Sonoma Coast, offers a transparent medium ruby color and enticing aromas of rhubarb, cranberry and pomegranate wreathed with sassafras and cloves, rose petals and lilac. The texture feels like the coolest, sexiest satin imaginable, riven by acidity as striking as a red sash on a blue coat; the resulting sense of tension, resolution and balance is the substance of which great wines are made. Oak is subliminal, a subtle, supple shaping influence, so the wine feels quite lithe and light on its feet; flavors of spiced and macerated black cherries and plums emit a curl of smoke and a wisp of ash as prelude to a lively finish permeated by notes of briers, brambles and loam. 14.2 percent alcohol. Production was 279 cases. Sublime pinot noir for drinking through 2017 or ’18. Exceptional. About $60.
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