Here’s how I like my pinot grigio: lean and lithe, bright and vibrant, yet with a winsome, csm_pinot_grigio_2005_riserva_7895065a86pretty touch. The example in question is the Marco Felluga “Mongris” Pinot Grigio 2015, from Italy’s far northeastern Collio region, which shares a border with Slovenia. Collio is a version of the Italian word colli, which means “hills,” this rolling terrain being composed of layers of sandstone, limestone and clay once the ocean floor. Made all in stainless steel, the Marco Felluga “Mongris” Pinot Grigio 2015 offers a pale gold color and enticing aromas of acacia and heather, green apple and pear, seashell and salt marsh; a few moments in the glass bring in notes of roasted lemon and almond skin. It’s a spare and bracing pinot grigio, crystalline in its chiming acidity and scintillating flinty minerality and its finish of grapefruit pith and lime peel, though tasty with faceted citrus and stone-fruit flavors. 13 percent alcohol. Drink through 2018 with seafood risottos, grilled fish (preferably right on the beach) and fresh oysters. Excellent. About $18, representing Good Value.

Imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif. A sample for review.

Looking for a true Rhone Valley experience in a California red wine? Well, then, you should be. bns12c_bottle_180x579pxIn any case, look for a bottle of the Bonny Doon Bien Nacido X-Block Syrah 2012, Santa Maria Valley. In all its wild and woolly and autumnal 100 percent syrah nature, the wine feels elemental, fundamental and inevitable. The color is an opaque black-ruby shading to a glowing violet rim; aromas of roasted meat and wet dog are foresty and loamy, opening to notes of macerated and slightly stewed blackberries, currants and plums; a few moments in the glass bring in hints of black pepper, tar, oolong tea and fruitcake, iodine, smoke and roasted fennel, with a bell-tone of blueberry. This syrah rests on deep foundations of briery and granitic tannic power and dynamic acidity, combined with very intense and concentrated black fruit flavors, polished oak and graphite minerality, these factors meshing across the palate and culminating in a brooding, darksome, feral finish. 13 percent alcohol. Tremendous character and personality. Production was 313 cases. The wine is a natural with braised short ribs or veal shanks and such cool-weather fare, though we drank it happily with black bean and sweet potato chili. Now through 2020 to ’22. Exceptional. About $50.

A sample for review.

Etude Wines was founded in 1982 in Napa Valley by Tony Soter to focus on cabernet sauvignon and pinot noir made from purchased grapes grown in highly regarded vineyards. After a series of purchases, acquisitions and transformations, Etude is owned by Treasury Wine Estates, along with a rather astonishing roster of properties in California, Australia and other regions. The winery still concentrates on pinot noir and cabernet sauvignon, usually produced from named vineyards in small quantities. Under review today are six of Etude’s single-vineyard pinot noir wines from 2014, touching AVAs in Carneros, Sonoma Coast, Santa Maria Valley, Sta. Rita Hills in California; Yamhill-Carlton in Willamette Valley; and Central Otago in New Zealand. Winemaker is Jon Priest. These are, let me just say, splendid examples of the pinot noir grape and the resonance rung upon it by specific locations. Priest sensibly employs a minimal amount of oak, as well as keeping alcohol levels to reasonable levels. These are all worth searching for.

Samples for review.
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The Etude Ellenbach Vineyard Pinot Noir 2014, Sonoma Coast, aged 13 months in French oak, percent new barrels. The steeply sloping vineyard sits at around 800 feet elevation, just above the morning fog line, four miles east of the Pacific Ocean. The color is dark ruby-mulberry with a slightly paler rim. A burst of cloves, allspice and sandalwood precedes notes of a compote of black and red cherries and plums, wreathed with loam and graphite, mint and iodine, presided over by high-tones of pomegranate and cranberry; pretty heady stuff, all right. On the palate, this pinot noir brings in more red fruit — cherries and currants — its deeply spicy character buoyed by slightly flinty minerality, dusty tannins and lively acidity that cuts a swath on the tongue. The finish delivers a polished melange of spice, graphite tinged minerals and an element of heathery meadow flowers. 14.8 percent alcohol. Now through 2020 to ’24. Excellent. About $60.
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The Etude Grace Benoist Ranch Estate Grown Pinot Noir 2014, Carneros, aged 12 months in French oak, 25 percent new barrels. Located at the northwest corner of the Carneros AVA, the vineyard features various types of well-drained, rocky volcanic soils and is influenced by breezes from the Pacific. The color is medium mulberry-magenta shading to a transparent circumference. Scents of red and black cherries are permeated by notes of sassafras, pomegranate and cranberry, talc, lilac and rose petals; the perfume grows deeper and more redolent as the moments pass. This pinot noir embodies beautiful shape and substance, flowing on the tongue like perfection in a lithe, supple stream of satiny texture; there’s a touch of baked plum in the red and black fruit flavors and a strain of dusty graphite minerality to the subtle yet skillfully chiseled tannins. 14.3 percent alcohol. Now through 2020 to ’24. Excellent. About $45.
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The superlative transparent violet-magenta hue of the Etude North Canyon Vineyard Pinot Noir 2014, Santa Maria Valley, belies the seriousness of its frame and foundation and its earthy, loamy character. The vineyard, planted in calcareous clay sandstone, lies in a secluded canyon that’s a bit more exposed to sunlight and a bit warmer than the rest of the valley. The wine aged 10 months in French oak, 25 percent new barrels, the least oak influence of these six wines. A complex array of spicy effects — cloves, sassafras and cumin — heightens elements of ripe red and black cherries that open to notes of wild berries and oolong tea, pomegranate and cranberries. A profoundly earthy, loamy character penetrates the entire enterprise, lending deep roots for its graphite-tinged tannins and minerality. 14.4 percent alcohol. Now through 2021 to ’25. Excellent. About $45.
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Location is everything, n’est-ce pas? For example, the Fiddlestix Vineyard lies in the Sta. Rita Hills AVA that is part of the larger Santa Ynez Valley AVA, all encompassed by Santa Barbara County. The hills and ranges run east and west here, unusual for California where the typical etu_12fiddlestix_pinot_nv_400x126 mountainous orientation is north-south, and a configuration that allows a direct inlet for fog and cooling ocean breezes. The vineyard receives its share of those daily climatic events but stands low enough against the hills to be sheltered from strong afternoon winds. The combination of exposure and protection with well-drained clay-loam and calcareous marine shale soils results in pinot noir wines of great depth and finesse.

The Etude Fiddlestix Vineyard Pinot Noir 2014, Sta. Rita Hills, aged 12 months in French oak, 25 percent new barrels. The color is a transparent medium ruby-magenta hue of transfixing radiance; aromas of rhubarb, sassafras and sandalwood, pomegranate and cranberry, smoky black cherries and plums achieve a Platonic level of loveliness, while on the palate the wine is lithe, supple and satiny. juicy black and red cherry flavors reach down to elements of some rooty black tea, talc and chalk and a kind of gravelly condensation of graphite minerality. A few minutes in the glass bring out notes of rose petals and lavender. Redolent, even pungent; deeply spicy and flavorful; elegant and fine-boned yet with a dynamic of bright acidity, lightly dusted tannins and the shaping force of subtle oak — this is one of the most complete and wholly beautiful pinot noirs I have tasted this year. 14.3 percent alcohol. Now through 2020 to ’24. Exceptional. About $45.
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This wine takes us to Oregon’s Willamette Valley. Approved in 2004, the Yamhill-Carlton District AVA is a horse-shoe shaped region that includes only acreage that lies between 200 and 1,000 feet elevation, where marine sediments compose some of the oldest soil in Willamette Valley. The vineyard from which this wine is derived stands at 600 feet. The Etude Yamhill Vista Vineyard Pinot Noir 2014, Yamhill-Carlton District, aged 13 months in French oak, 33 percent new barrels. The color is transparent medium ruby shading to a mulberry rim; to notes of black cherries and plums, pomegranate and cranberry, the wine adds touches of tobacco and black tea, mint and iodine, as well as the deep loamy character typical of Willamette Valley pinot noir. The texture is superbly satiny, though powered by swingeing acidity and energetic tannins; the wine is quite dry, revealing an immediacy of granitic minerality that leads to a brooding, chiseled finish. 14.3 percent alcohol. Now through 2021 to ’24. Excellent. About $60.
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Talk about far afield, this wine takes us to New Zealand and Central Otago, the world’s southernmost wine region. The Etude Bannockburn Pinot Noir 2014, Central Otago, spent 12 months in French oak, 30 percent new barrels. I found this to be an extremely fine-grained, richly detailed and slightly exotic pinot noir. The color is transparent magenta-mulberry with a delicate rim; aromas of macerated and lightly stewed red and black cherries are permeated by notes of cloves and allspice, red licorice and violets, loam and damp wood ash; after 15 or 20 minutes, the bouquet unfurls hints of cedar, iodine and rosemary. Nothing opulent or flamboyant here, the wine is spare and honed, riven by arrows of acidity and borne by gravel-like minerality and layers of loam and foresty elements. 13.8 percent alcohol. I loved it. Now through 2020 to ’24. Excellent. About $60.
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Sometimes, friends, you just have to have one of those snappy, slap-yo-face, fresh-as-raindrops sauvignon blanc wines from New Zealand. Here’s a terrific example. Made all in stainless steel, the Whitehaven Sauvignon Blanc 2015, from New Zealand’s well-known Marlborough region, lying at the extreme northeastern corner of the South Island, offers a shimmering medium straw hue and scintillating aromas of grapefruit, lime peel, pea shoot, celery seed and lemongrass. This one is as crisp and vibrant as they come, powered by squeaky-bright acidity and a burgeoning element of damp limestone and flint. Flavors of roasted lemon and spiced pear reveal notes of sunny, leafy figs with a hint of mango, these flowing with lithe and dynamic verve across the palate. It all just makes you pretty happy to drink. 13 percent alcohol. Winemaker was Sam Smail. Now through 2018 as a highly effective aperitif or with seafood risottos, grilled fish or goat cheeses. Excellent. About $20, representing Good Value.

The wine is distributed in the USA by Gallo. A sample for review.

We are inching our way toward the most festive season of the year, a hectic, expensive, exhausting and frequently joyful stretch that encompasses Thanksgiving, My Birthday, Christmas, bottle-etoile-roseNew Year and Twelfth Night. Call it Yuletide 2.0. To slide into the proper spirit, I offer as Wine of the Day, No. 201, the Domaine Chandon Étoile Rosé, a non-vintage sparkling wine from the company that’s pretty much the grand-daddy of sparkling wine in California. By “non-vintage,” the common parlance, I really mean “multiple-vintage,” since this product and virtually all non-vintage Champagnes and sparkling wines contain wine from the current year as well as reserve wines from previous years, the point being to lend depth and character to the product from wines that have aged for several years. Now Chandon is surprisingly reticent about information for this sparkler and others I received recently. I can tell you, for example, that the grapes for the Domaine Chandon Étoile Rosé were grown in the cool Carneros region of Napa and Sonoma counties and that the blend includes chardonnay, pinot noir and pinot meunier, but not in what proportion. I can tell you that the sparkling wine rested on the lees in the bottle for “at least three years,” but I cannot be more specific. I can also tell you that the Domaine Chandon Etoile Rose is beguiling and irresistible. The color is ruddy salmon-copper, animated by a steady frothing stream of tiny bubbles. A cool rush of orange rind and strawberry compote is twined with smoke and seashell-like salinity with hints of cloves and lightly toasted brioche. This is lively on the palate, even sprightly and balletic, yet it delivers depths of limestone and chalk minerality, as well as flavors of roasted lemons, spiced pears and a hint of red currant. 13 percent alcohol. A very attractive and enticing brut rose. Excellent. About $50.

A sample for review.

Yes, the 200th Wine of the Day! I launched this series in May 2015 when, after breaking my right (and primary) arm, I couldn’t type as much as usual. Long healed, though, I continue the sequence of posts on featured individual wines because it’s fun and it gives me the chance to highlight favorite wines from my tastings. I also like the element of surprise; at least I hope that some of these selections have been as unexpected as they are gratifying. Anyway, here’s to 200 more Wines of the Day.

So, today’s feature is the Cousiño-Macul Isidora Sauvignon Gris 2015, from Chile’s Valle del EISAG3USA-EURMaule, a cool-climate region way south of Santiago. (The label illustration here, from the winery’s website, says Maipo Valley, but the label on my sample indicates Maule.) The grape is a pink-skinned clonal variation of sauvignon blanc that was almost exterminated by the phylloxera scourge of the 1880s in Europe but has seen something of a minor revival, mainly in Bordeaux and Chile, though in Napa Valley, for example, Chimney Rock Winery grows it for its Elevage white wine blend. The Cousiño-Macul Isidora 2015 is made all in stainless steel, retaining beguiling freshness and immediacy. The color is very pale gold; aromas of straw and heather, jasmine and almond blossom, roasted lemons and yellow plums carry a grassy-herbal top note with a slightly astringent element. On the palate, lip-smacking acidity keeps the wine pulsing through to a finish bracing with crystallized grapefruit, a hint of saline sea-breeze and a burgeoning limestone and flint character. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2017. The winery, by the way, was established in 1856 and is the only 19th Century winery in Chile still owned and operated by its founding family. Winemaker is Gabriel Mustakis. Very Good+. About $15, representing Excellent Value.

Imported by Winebow Inc, New York. A sample for review.

That’s Mount Etna to you, Bub, the highest and most active volcano in Europe. Not to be bothered by pesky events like eruptions, deadly ash showers and lava flows, the inhabitants of the foothills of Etna, located on the east coast of Sicily between Messina and Catania, have cultivated farms and vineyards since time immemorial. The rich volcanic soil on the north, east and south slopes of the volcano — the area covered by the D.O.C regulations — is especially beneficial in mineral content. The rules of Etna Bianco allow a minimum of 60 percent carricante grapes and no more than 40 percent catarratto; Etna Rosso must consist of a minimum of 80 percent nerello mascalese grapes. All the grapes involved, both in majority and minority positions, are native to the region.

The wines under consideration today are an Etna Bianco and an Etna Rosso, each being, I think, an excellent representative of the style and the grapes. The wines are eminently drinkable and food-friendly but possess plenty of personality and character.

Samples for review.
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The Tenuta di Fessina Erse 2014, Etna Bianco, is a blend of 80 percent carricante grapes and a combined 20 percent catarratto and minnella, and you can add those to your roster of grapes little-known outside their own regions. The wine sees no oak, being made completely in stainless steel. The color is medium straw-gold, a perfect introduction to heady aromas of straw, heather and meadow flowers, with notes of dried pears and apricots and hints of quince and ginger. The whole effect on the palate is bright, spare, dry, transparent, saline and savory; flavors of roasted lemons and spiced pears are deeply spicy and driven by clean, vivid acidity and a touch of a scintillating limestone edge; a hint of dried herbs and flowers and almond skin lingers through the finish. 12 percent alcohol. Winemaker was Gian Domenica Negro. Production was about 540 cases. Now through 2017 with such fare as asparagus risotto, frito misto or, in our case, the Filipino chicken and rice stew called lugaw. Excellent. About $25.

Leonardo LoCascio Selections, The Winebow Group, New York.
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Alta Moro is a new label from Sicily’s well-known Cusumano estate. Made from 100 percent nerello mascalese grapes, the wine aged in a combination of stainless steel tanks and 2,000-liter barrels, equal to about 528 gallons. (In other words, not the standard French barrique of about 59 gallons.) The color is the entrancing red cherry hue of a glass of wine in a Dutch still-life painting. Did I say cherries? Oh, yes, red and black cherries with hints of slightly astringent cherry skins and pits, heightened by notes of cloves and allspice, a bit of earth and loam and notes of tobacco, cigarette paper and cedar, with a slightly resinous quality. The wine is quite dry, sporting a lovely open-knit texture and a feeling of lightness and elegance despite the burgeoning dusty tannic quality that turns rather austere through the finish; there’s a satisfying aspect of acid grip here, as well as a bit of pull from the tannins. 14 percent alcohol. Now through 2019 to ’20, not with steaks but with braised short-ribs or veal shanks and hearty pizzas or pasta dishes. Excellent. About $24.

Imported by Terlato Wines International, Lake Bluff, Ill.
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Today’s selection takes us to Hungary’s Csopak wine region, nestled in the hills above Lake st_donat_furmint2014-web1Balaton, a narrow and shallow body of water in the country’s western area. The grape is the white furmint, indigenous to Hungary and a growing (though still minor) presence in the United States, analogous to the position that Austria’s grüner veltliner grape occupied 25 years ago. You’ll have to look for the St. Donat Estate Furmint 2014 — the quantity is limited — but it serves as an exemplar of the grape’s capabilities. No new oak here, but aging in stainless steel tanks and used oak barrels; spontaneous fermentation with native yeasts. (Winemaker was Tamás Kovács.) The color is very pale gold; scents of straw, celery, peach and greengage unfold leafy-figgy notes; a few moments in the glass bring in hints of acacia, spiced pear and green tea. These elements segue seamlessly to the palate, where brisk acidity propels with liveliness and grace a powerful limestone component that feels lacy, spare and transparent through the finish. 11 percent alcohol. This is your wine if you’re doing trout with brown butter and capers; salmon fillets marinated in olive oil, lemon juice, soy sauce and ginger; grilled shrimp or mussels; or a seafood risotto. Production was 270 cases. Drink now through 2018. Excellent. About $20, marking Great Value.

A sample for review.

I know, I could have written, “Two Groups of Pinots, Three Each,” but I like the off-rhyme of “trios” and “pinots,” as well as the rhythm of the line. So be it.

In any case, the two groups of pinot noir wines, three each, under review today have little to do with each other except for the grape variety. Inman Family Wines is in Sonoma County’s Russian River Valley AVA, while Zena Crown lies in the Eola-Amity Hills AVA of Oregon’s Willamette Valley, considerably to the north. Jackson Family Wines purchased the vineyard just west of Salem in 2013. The other quality these wines share is that, whatever differences they display because of the divergence in geography, geology, climate and terroir (and oak regimen), each is a model of what can be done with the grape by thoughtful growers and winemakers concentrating on a particular place.

These wines were samples for review.
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The Zena Crown Vineyard Conifer Pinot Noir 2013, Eola-Amity Hills, aged 17 months in French oak, connifer75 percent new barrels. The grapes derive from the vineyard’s East 12 and West 1A and 14 blocks, grown in volvanic soil of varying depths. The color is a beautiful transparent medium ruby shading to an ethereal rim; aromas of red and black cherries are wreathed with notes of sassafras, rhubarb and cloves, all becoming a little meaty and fleshy as the moments pass and then opening to a hint of some shy astringent woodland flower. This is a rooty, tea-like pinot noir that expands to touch areas of loam, briers and brambles as well as reaching to depths of real tannic and acidic power, yet displaying a delicate floral filigree around the circumference. There’s a mineral edge that becomes more spare and chiseled through the finish, which contributes a final fillip of resiny pine and rosemary and an autumnal haze of leaf-smoke. 13 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2020 to ’23. Production was 240 cases. A pinot noir of awesome, paradoxical and wholly gratifying complexity. Excellent. About $75.
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The Zena Crown (Sigma) Pinot Noir 2013, Eola-Amity Hills — the Greek capital Sigma is a symbol for zena-259“sum” in mathematics, though that’s putting the case rather simply; WordPress will not allow the symbol to be uploaded to this page — aged 17 months in French oak, 71 percent new barrels; the grapes are grown in Blocks 4, 5 and 12 of the vineyard, providing a varied background of characteristics. First is the dark ruby hue that shades to vivid magenta, then a wealthy perfumed bouquet of talc, lavender and violets, cranberry and pomegranate, graphite and loam. This is a deep rich pinot noir that feels sifted and layered in complexity, and while you note with a touch of alarm the presence of oak, that element subsides to become a shaping factor rather than a dominant influence. Lip-smacking acidity keeps the wine taut and animated, while it practically vibrates around a core of graphite, iodine and iron. 12.9 percent alcohol, a truly benign presence in this age of 14.5 percent and higher. Production was 302 cases. Drink now through 2021 through 2024. Excellent. About $75.
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Blocks East 5 and 6 of the Zena Crown Vineyard start at 600 feet elevation and slope to the south, allowing plenty of sunlight exposure. The Zena Crown “Slope” Pinot Noir 2013, Eola-Amity zena_slope_laydownHills, aged 17 months in French oak, 85 percent new barrels, which seems to me to be an extraordinary amount of new oak for pinot, but the wine apparently soaked up that wood influence and came out with tremendous confidence and elan, with lovely heft and balance, and a lithe supple, satiny texture; it rolls across the palate like liquid money. (You’ll need some money if you want to buy a few bottles.) The color is brilliant medium ruby shading to an ephemeral, invisible rim; it’s a rooty, brambly and briery pinot noir that offers plenty of earthy-loamy elements to shore up scents and flavors of black cherries, currants and plums with a tinge of red fruit and hints of sassafras and cloves. It’s a large-framed wine within its context of succulence, acid brightness and dusty tannins, all subsumed to a broad component of graphite minerality. 12.7 percent alcohol, and when was the last time you saw a wine from California with this sensible an alcohol level? Drink now through 2020 to ’23. Production was 348 cases. Excellent. About $100.
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Let’s start with an email statement from owner and winemaker Kathleen Inman:

“As for barrel regime, I purchased six new Sirugue barrels and 2 Billon barrels (used for the inman-sexton
Sexton only) for my Pinot in 2013 and I think I began with 78 or 80 barrels of Pinot that year. That would be about 10% new each year. I use my barrels for up to 8 years. I do not keep track of how many new, one-year, two-year or older barrels go into each final blend. My answer to how much oak is – the right amount of oak for my taste.” In other words, new oak at this winery is held to a bare minimum, with the emphasis placed on a blend of wines from barrels of myriad ages.

So, let’s go now to the Inman Family Wines Sexton Road Vineyard Pinot Noir 2013, Sonoma Coast. The color is moderately dark ruby shading to lavender transparency; you notice immediately the notes of black and red cherries with the slight astringency of their skins and pits, hints of cloves, sassafras and sandalwood. This pinot is substantial, with real heft and thrust, but it feels weightless on the palate in a wonderful contention and resolution of the feminine and masculine elements; a few moments in the glass bring in layers of leather and loam and forest floor, rhubarb and beet-root, all encompassed in a super supple satiny texture. Give this an hour and the finely-milled and sifted tannins assert themselves. 14.3 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2019 or ’21. Excellent. About $68.
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The Inman Family Pratt Vine Hill Pinot Noir 2013, Russian River Valley, displays a ravishing hue of transparent medium ruby fading to an invisible rim; if you could exist on color alone, this would be it. Aromas of cloves and pomegranate, sandalwood, red cherries and currants, lilac and rose petals, red licorice and loam circulate from the glass; it’s a dark, spicy, feral pinot noir, fleet with musky, meadowy notes of melon and cloves, loam and leather. The texture is supple and lithe, with a satin drape on the palate cut by rigorous acidity, dusty tannins and graphite minerality. 13.8 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2019 to 2023. Excellent. About $68.
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The Inman Family OGV Estate Pinot Noir 2013, Russian River Valley, retains a grip on inscrutability and reserve while exhibiting a panoply of sensual pleasures and potential. The color is a transparent mulberry-magenta hue; aromas of pomegranate and cloves, cranberry and sassafras open to notes of red and black cherries, leather and loam. Layers of sanded, polished and insistent tannins offer enough grit to provide some resistance on the palate, while bright acidity cuts a swath through the remarkably supple, satiny texture. The sense of animation blanaced by a paradoxical dark, brooding quality lends the wine great personality and character. 14.2 percent alcohol. This could use a year to age, but try through 2022 to ’24. Excellent. About $73.
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I prefer my chardonnays untainted by the specter of toasty new oak and creamy malolactic, and if 2014-morgan-metallico-chardonnayyou inhabit the same camp, you probably already know about Morgan Winery’s un-oaked chardonnay called Metallico. If not, here’s a chance to be introduced. The Morgan Metallico Un-Oaked Chardonnay 2014, Monterey, derives from vineyards in the specific Santa Lucia Highlands and Arroyo Seco AVAs and the broader Monterey appellation. It aged five months in stainless steel tanks, seeing no oak and no malolactic fermentation. The color is bright medium gold; bold aromas of pineapple and grapefruit, green apple and mango burst from the glass in a welter of cloves, quince and ginger and a defining limestone edge. That strain of flinty minerality continues on the palate, where the wine is animated by crisp, lively acidity and characterized by ripe, spicy (and fairly rich) citrus and stone-fruit flavors; a few moments in the glass bring in notes of jasmine and honeysuckle, with bass-tones of loam and sea-shell, all encompassed by a lithe supple texture. The alcohol content is a pleasant 13.5 percent. Drink through 2017 with all manner of fish and seafood dishes. Excellent. About $22.

A sample for review.

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