I say “affordable” because this French company, overseen by managing director Christian Seely, owns a group of high-powered properties whose products are not to be mentioned in the same sentence with the word “cheap.” AXA’s estates include the Bordeaux chateaux of Pichon Longueville Baron (Second growth in the 1855 Classification) and Pibran in Paulillac, Suduiraut (First growth) in Sauternes and Petit-Village in Pomerol; the distinguished Domaine de L’Arlot in Burgundy; Disznóko in Hungary, producer of top-notch Tokaj; and Quinto do Noval, one of the oldest — dating back to 1715 — and most prestigious Port properties in the Douro Valley. Man and woman cannot, however, live by expensive wine alone, so the company provides, from its outpost in the Languedoc and from Noval (table wine, not Port), less costly products that mere mortals can afford and enjoy. These are imported by Vintus LLC in Pleasantville, N.Y. and were, in this case, samples for review.
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So, the Cedro do Noval 2009 is a blend of 50 percent touriga nacional grapes, 30 percent touriga franca, 10 percent tinta roriz (known as tempranillo in Spain) and 10 percent syrah, and it’s the minor inclusion of the syrah that prevents this wine from carrying a Douro designation, syrah not being an allowed grape in that famous river valley. Thus the designation Vinho Regional Duriense, a term, I confess, that I have not seen until now. The color is a youthful dark ruby purple, and at almost five years old, the wine is notably fresh, pure and lively. Aromas of cedar, dried rosemary and its slightly resinous nature, dried thyme, spiced and macerated plums and red and black currants open to deeper touches of dusty graphite. Cedro do Noval 2009 defines robust and rustic, embodying a hearty, full-bodied character in its dense, chewy texture and ripe, deeply spicy and savory red and black fruit flavors; a supple structure emboldened by 18 months in French oak barrels is permeated by earthy, leathery tannins. 14 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018 to ’20 with the heartiest of grilled, roasted or braised meats. Very Good+. About $22.
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A blend of 60 percent syrah grapes, 30 percent grenache and 10 percent mourvèdre, Mas Belles Eaux “Les Coteaux” 2009, Languedoc, aged 15 months in one-to-three-year-old French oak barrels. The color is dark ruby with a magenta tinge at the rim; expressive aromas of ripe plums, cherries and blackberries are deeply spicy and laden with hints of lavender and potpourri, cloves and sandalwood, notes of leather, briers and brambles, all for an effect that’s both earthy and exotic. As was the case with the Cedro do Noval 09, this wine, at five years old, is fresh and clean and appealing, offering tasty plum and currant flavors infused with hints of dried spice and flowers and dusty graphite and supported by a structure of vibrant acidity and moderately firm tannins. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2016 to ’18 with roasted veal, coq au vin, rabbit fricassee. Excellent. About $20.
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Oddly enough, I haven’t written about Tres Picos Borsao since the 2005 vintage, a situation I now remedy because it’s one of the world’s great wine bargains. Made from 100 percent garnacha (or grenache) grapes in Spain’s Campo de Borja region, Tres Picos Borsao 2012 aged a few months half in stainless steel, half in French oak barrels. The color is intense dark ruby; aromas of ripe red and black currants and plums are permeated by notes of graphite and cloves, briers and brambles. On the palate, the wine is rich, spicy and dense, enlivened by spanking acidity and framed by moderately grainy, chewy tannins; a few moments in the glass add touches of black olives, smoked tea and dried rosemary to the savory red and black fruit flavors. This is vivacious without being flirty and robust without being rustic; it would be perfect with grilled chorizo sausages, leg of lamb, roasted peppers and such. Alcohol content not available. Drink now through 2015 or ’16. Very Good+. About $17, representing Great Value, and seen as low as $13 or $14.

A Jorge Ordoñez Selection, tasted at a local distributor’s event.

Here’s a winsome sparkling wine to ease you from Summer into Autumn. The Gérard Bertrand “Cuvée Thomas Jefferson” Brut Rosé 2012 is designated Crémant de Limoux, meaning that it hails from the countryside around the little town of Limoux — pop. 9,781 souls — a commune and subprefecture in the Aude department in the vast Languedoc-Roussillon region. Limoux lies a mere 30 kilometers or 19 miles south of the celebrated castle-city of Carcassonne, nestled in the French foothills of the Pyrenees mountains. Limoux — motto: “We Were First!” — claims its right as the birthplace of sparkling wine, for some reason focusing on the exact year of 1631. Be that as it may, most of the wine produced around Limoux — pronounced lee-MOO — is sparkling, either in the guise of Blanquette de Limoux, made principally from the indigenous mauzac grape, or Crémant de Limoux, which allows chardonnay and chenin blanc in the blend. Why Cuvée Thomas Jefferson? Because when that most Francophile of American presidents died, the only sparkling wines found in his cellar were from — guess! — Limoux.

The Gérard Bertrand “Cuvée Thomas Jefferson” Brut Rosé 2012, Crémant de Limoux, a blend of 70 percent chardonnay, 15 percent chenin blanc and 15 percent pinot noir, displays a very pale onion skin hue and a silvery torrent of tiny glinting bubbles. Faint notes of peaches and spiced pears offer a lightly floral aura and touches of hay and dried field herbs; way in the background there are undertones of orange rind and pomegranate. This is crisp, lively and buoyant on the palate, with cleanly etched acidity and more than a whisper of limestone minerality. On the palate, the wine delivers more citrus than stone-fruit, and it finishes with hints of grapefruit, roasted lemon and flint; it’s dry but with appealing ripeness and fine balance. 12.5 percent alcohol. Charming and delightful. Very Good+. About $22, my purchase.

Imported bu USA Wine West, Sausalito, Calif.

I think I’ll name my next rock group “Eclectic Plethora,” but be that as it may, today I offer again a bunch of rosé wines, from various regions of France and California, in hopes of convincing My Readers not to abandon rosés simply because Labor Day has come and gone. While the most delicate rosés may be most appropriate in High Summer, even they can serve a purpose throughout the rest of the year. More robust and versatile rosés can be consumed with a variety of foods, and by “robust” I don’t mean blockbusters a few shades less stalwart than cabernet sauvignon or zinfandel, I just mean rosés that deliver a bit more body and fruit than the most delicate. As is my habit in these “Weekend Wine Notes,” I don’t include reams of technical, historical or geographical information, much as that sort of data makes our hearts go pitty-pat, because the intention here is to offer quick and incisive reviews that will pique your interest and tempt your palate. Unless otherwise indicated, these were samples for review. Enjoy!
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Chateau de Campuget “Tradition de Campuget” Rosé 2013, Costières de Nîmes. 13% alc. 70% syrah, 30% grenache (according to the label); 50% syrah, 50 % grenache blanc (according to the press release). Pale onion skin color; delicate hints of strawberries and watermelon, ephemeral notes of dried herbs and dusty-flint minerality; quite dry, crisp and spare; a flush of floral nuance. The most ethereal of this group of rosé wines, yet bound by tensile strength. Very Good+. About $10, a Great Bargain.
Dreyfus, Ashby, New York.
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Laurent Miquel “Pere et Fils” Cinsault Syrah 2013, Pays d’Oc. 12.5% alc. 80% cinsault, 20% syrah. The palest flush of pink imaginable; raspberry, red currants, celery seed, dried thyme; clean and crisp, a resonant note of limestone minerality; the cinsault lends a vibrant spine of keen acidity. Simple style but enjoyable, especially at the price. Very Good. About $11.
Frederick Wildman and Sons, New York.
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Domaine Les Aphillanthes Rosé 2013, Côtes du Rhône. 13% alc. Cinsault, grenache, counoise, mourvèdre. Slightly ruddy copper-salmon color; raspberries and strawberries, hints of peach and melon; slightly herbal; very dry and crisp with tides of flint and limestone minerality and vibrant acidity; appealing texture, clean and elegant. Excellent. About $14, representing Good Value.
Peter Weygandt Selection, Weygandt-Metzler, Unionville, Penn.
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Domaine de Mourchon “Loubié” Rosé 2013, Seguret, Côtes du Rhône Villages. 12.5% alc. 60% grenache, 40% syrah. Entrancing pale salmon-peach color; very clean and fresh, with notes of raspberries and red cherries, a hint of melon; an earthy touch of raspiness and cherry stems; almost a shimmer of limestone minerality and crisp acidity, yet with a lovely enfolding texture; finish offers hints of cloves and dried thyme. Exemplary balance and tone. Excellent. About $16 to $18.
Cynthia Hurley French Wines, West Newton, Mass.
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Chateau d’Aqueria 2012, Tavel. 14% alc. 50% grenache, 12% each syrah, cinsault and clairette, 8% mourvèdre, 5% boueboulenc, 1% picpoul. Ruddy salmon-peach color; the ripest and fleshiest of these rosé wines; spiced and macerated strawberries and raspberries, notes of cloves and cardamom, dusty dried field herbs (garrigue); fairly robust and vigorous; quite dry, almost austere, but juicy with spice and limestone-inflected red fruit flavors. The 2013 version of this wine in on the market, but I was sent 2012 as a sample, so drink up. Very Good+. About $18.
Kobrand Corp., Purchase, N.Y.
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McCay Cellars Rosé 2013, Lodi. 12.5% alc. Primarily old vine carignane with some grenache. 253 cases. Lovely peach-salmon color; subdued peach, melon and strawberry aromas, hints of red currants and pomegranate and a note of rose petal; subtle, clean, refreshing but with incisive acidity and considerable limestone minerality, a dusty brambly element as complement to a texture that’s both supple and spare. Beautifully done. Excellent. About $18.
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Baudry-Dutour “Cuvee Marie Justine” Chinon 2013, Val de Loire. 12.5 % alc. 100% cabernet franc. Very pale onion skin hue; delicate and slightly dusty hints of strawberries and red currants; notes of dried herbs and spice, just a touch of a floral component, violets or lilacs; crisp and lively acidity, an animated element of limestone minerality; cool, clean and refreshing but revealing a scant bit of loamy earthiness on the finish. beautifully knit. Very Good+. About $20, my purchase.
William Harrison Imports, Manassas, Va.
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Tablas Creek Vineyard Patelin de Tablas Rosé 2013, Paso Robles. 14.1% alc. 73% grenache, 22% mourvèdre, 5% counoise. 1,540 cases. Classic pale onion-skin hue; smoke, dust, damp flint and limestone; dried currants and raspberries, deeply earthy and minerally; hints of melon and mulberry; a beguiling combination of opulence and austerity, hitting all the right notes of balance and intrigue. Excellent. About $22, my purchase.
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Copain Wines “Tous Ensemble” Rosé of Pinot Noir 2013, Anderson Valley. 12.7% alc. 100% pinot noir. 1,435 cases. Pale salmon-copper color; raspberry, melon, sour cherry, very pure and fresh; provocative acidity and scintillating limestone minerality keep it brisk and breezy; lovely balance between chiseled spareness and lush elegance. One of California’s best rosés. Excellent. About $24, my purchase.
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Three Sticks Wines was founded by Bill Price III — get it? his surfer handle was Billy Three Sticks — who also owns one of California’s best-known vineyards, Durell Vineyard, which he purchased in 1998. He co-founded the private equity firm Texas Pacific Group in 1992 and sold his share back to the company in 2007, and that, friends, is a lesson in how you get into the vineyard and winery business. Price is chairman of Kosta Brown Winery and Gary Farrell Winery — you know those names — and has interest in Kistler, another name you know. He met winemaker and fellow-surfer Don Van Staaveren (image at right) in 1996 when TPG acquired Chateau St. Jean from Suntory, and in 2004 Price asked Van Staaveren to come aboard as winemaker at Three Sticks. (I’m condensing history quite a bit here.) The “winery” occupies space in an industrial/warehouse area in Sonoma, a practical measure since no one has to worry about tasting rooms, landscaping, high-end facilities, jazz concerts, picnic grounds, executive chefs and so on, though a great deal of organizational logistics is required. Van Staaveren, who created the sensational Cinq Cepage cabernet sauvignon for Chateau St. Jean, indeed resembles nothing more nor less than a gracefully aging, if slightly craggy, California boy; when I visited Three Sticks in the Summer of 2013, he wore a cast on one arm, the result of a surfing mishap. The wines he creates from the Durell Vineyard and other vineyards are thoughtfully made and embody tremendous personality and character. Unfortunately, they are produced in limited quantities and are available only on an allocation list. They are worth a visit to the winery’s website threestickswines.com to sign up. These examples were samples for review.

This post is the fourth in a series devoted to wines made from two grapes that seem to occur together, chardonnay and pinot noir, on the model of Burgundy.
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The Three Sticks One Sky Chardonnay 2012, Sonoma Mountain — the first Three Sticks release for this wine from a vineyard that remains anonymous — was treated in a manner traditional for California chardonnay: barrel fermentation; 14 months aging in French oak barrels, 50 percent new; full malolactic fermentation. The color is medium straw-gold; classic aromas of ripe pineapple and grapefruit feel infused by quince and ginger, spiced pear and toasted hazelnuts, amid a background of limestone minerality. This is a supremely rich chardonnay, slightly creamy but not buttery or tropical, and its lusciousness is tempered by bright acidity and that scintillating limestone element; citrus and stone-fruit flavors are highlighted by notes of orange marmalade and a hint of grapefruit pith. Altogether, this is a round, supple, mouth-filling chardonnay that displays lovely, if a bit florid, balance and tone. 14.8 percent alcohol. Production was 222 cases. Drink now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $50.
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The winemaker took a completely opposite approach to the Three Sticks Durell Vineyard Origin Chardonnay 2012, Sonoma Valley. This wine was fermented in giant concrete egg-shaped vessels and aged 14 months in small steel barrels; not a smidgeon of oak touched it, and it did not go through malolactic. The grapes derived from two areas in the Durell Vineyard, “Old Wente 5,” on a northwest-facing slope of light soil, and “V9,” one of the rockiest and windiest parts of the vineyard. The color is medium straw-gold; the first impression is of something earthy, highly structured, almost tannic in effect, but with a core of remarkable resonance and vitality that animates captivating scents and flavors of quince jam and crystallized ginger, candied grapefruit and spiced pear with hints of lemon oil and lime peel, the whole package conveying the feeling of a lacy transparency of fruit over a dense, almost talc-like texture and a vibrant structure of limestone, damp gravel and chiming acidity. All in all, amazing energy, presence and tone, a wine that gives new meaning to “no-oak chardonnay.” 14.6 percent alcohol. Production was 266 cases. Drink now through 2020 to ’22. Exceptional. About $48.
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The Three Sticks Durell Vineyard Pinot Noir 2011, Sonoma Coast, took grapes from three blocks of the estate vineyard, all of which greet the sunrise: The Extension, a steep slope that falls mainly east but a little to the south; the Terraces, an area of slightly terraced rows running north-south and with an eastern exposure; Block R, a cool, windy location of light soil with red volcanic deposits that falls on a slight slope to the east. The grapes fermented in open-top vessels, and the wine aged 14 months in French oak barrels, 50 percent new. The color is a translucent and luminous medium ruby hue; beguiling aromas of pomegranate, rhubarb and cranberry are permeated by notes of cloves and allspice, loam, briers and brambles and a hint of graphite; a few moments in the glass bring up hints of smoky red and black cherries, rose petals and sandalwood. This is a substantial pinot noir, blessed with a sense of total confidence and completion, though whatever character it possesses of power and dynamism is complemented by qualities of grace, delicacy and elegance. 13.5 percent alcohol. Production was 170 cases. Drink now through 2018 to 2020. Exceptional. About $65.
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Few wineries in Napa Valley and indeed in California are as iconic, both physically and metaphysically, as the Robert Mondavi Winery. Its mission-style facility on Hwy 29 on Napa Valley is unmistakable. The story has often been told of how Robert Mondavi (1913-2008), in a feud with his brother Peter about the operation of the Charles Krug winery, left that business and launched his own winery in 1966, eventually becoming a wine-juggernaut of world-wide innovation and influence. As they say, the rest is history, though the history of the winery related on a timeline on the company’s website skips from 2002 to 2005, omitting the fact that the over-extended family sold the kit-n-kaboodle to Constellation Brands in November 2004 for a billion dollars. The wise move that Constellation made was to retain Genevieve Janssens as director of winemaking, a position she has held since 1997, thus lending a sense of continuity and purpose. Modavi continues to release a dizzying array of products — a rose! a semillon! (neither of which I have seen) — but the concentration is on the varieties that made its name, often produced at levels of “regular” bottlings, single-vineyard and reserve: cabernet sauvignon and pinot noir, chardonnay and sauvignon blanc. Today, in this series, I consider the Robert Mondavi Reserve Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, from 2012.

These wines were samples for review.
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Let’s start with red, this one being my favorite of the pair. The Robert Mondavi Reserve Pinot Noir 2012, Carneros, Napa Valley, spent 10 months in 100 percent new French oak barrels, and to my mind that’s a lot of new oak for pinot noir. Despite my opinion, however, the grapes soaked up that oak, and the wine came out sleek and satiny; this is no ethereal, evanescent pinot noir, but a wine of substance and bearing. The color is dark ruby with a purple/magenta tinge; aromas of black cherry and raspberry are bolstered by notes of pomegranate and sassafras, oolong tea, graphite and loam, all in all retaining a winsome quality in the earthiness. Nothing winsome on the palate, though; while the texture is wonderfully supple and attractive, and the black and red fruit flavors are deep and delicious, this is a pinot noir that takes its dimensions seriously, as elements of new leather, briers and brambles and slightly woody spice testify. 14.5 percent alcohol. At not quite two years old, the Robert Mondavi Reserve Pinot Noir 2012, Carneros, Napa Valley, is still in its formative years; try from 2015 or ’16 through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $60.
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Unfortunately, the Robert Mondavi Reserve Chardonnay 2012, Carneros, Napa Valley, pushes all my wrong buttons as far as the chardonnay grape is concerned. The color is medium straw-gold; with its rich and ripe mango-papaya trajectory, this is more tropical than I would want a chardonnay to be, not even accounting for its creamy elements of lemon curd and lemon tart, its vanilla and nutmeg and touch of lightly buttered cinnamon toast. The wine aged a sensible 10 months in French oak barrels, 58 percent new — that’s the sensible part — but its over-abundant spice and its nuances of toffee and burnt match detract from the grape’s purity of expression, and it lacks by several degrees the minerality to give the wine balance and energy. I know, I know, many of My Readers are going to say, “Well, look, FK, this is an argument about style, not about whether this is a ‘good’ or ‘bad’ wine,” and I will reply, “Yes, I’m aware of that fact, but a style of winemaking that obscures the virtues of the grape is folly.” This is, frankly, not a chardonnay that I would choose to drink. 13.5 percent alcohol; that’s a blessing. Now through 2017 or ’18, but Not Recommended. About $40.
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I haven’t chosen a pinot grigio as Wine of the Week since sometime in February 2012, the primary reason being that this space is reserved for products that offer distinction, class, style and, usually, value. Many pinot grigios indeed don’t cost much, but they tend to fall down in the areas of style, class and distinction. An exception to that rule is the Livon Pinot Grigio 2013, Collio, from Italy’s northeastern province of Friuli-Venezia Giulia. Made all in stainless steel, this pinot grigio offers a pale straw-gold color with a faint green overlay; aromas of almond, almond skin, roasted lemon and lemon balm are highlighted by notes of lemongrass, verbena, nutmeg and a bracing sort of salt-marsh aura. No inconsequential or innocuous little quaffer, the Livon Pinot Grigio 2013 delivers a fairly dense texture that supports lemon, spiced pear and yellow plum flavors enlivened by incisive acidity and decisive crystalline limestone minerality. The whole package resonates with expressive savory and saline qualities that lift the wine above the ordinary; the finish is elegant and a bit austere. 12.5 percent alcohol. Now through 2015 with shrimp risotto, broiled trout with lemon and capers, clam spaghetti, that sort of thing. Excellent. About $17, representing Good Value.

Imported by Angelini Selections, Centerbrook, Conn. A sample for review.

This trio of Soave Classico wines from the Inama estate will probably be among the best examples, if not the best, that you have tried. Notable for their floral nature, their round fruity character balanced by keen acidity and limestone minerality and their impressive presence and tone, they are perfect for drinking with the seafood dishes so prevalent in the Veneto. Winemaker is Stefano Inama, who brings a thoughtful touch to his products, particularly in the nuances of used oak barrels and stainless steel tanks. The wines are made from 100 percent garganega grapes and are imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, in the city of Napa, California. These were samples for review.
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Inama’s basic release, the “Vin Soave” 2012, Soave Classico, spends its formative months in stainless steel tanks, thereby retaining enticing freshness and crisp acidity. This is a pretty wine, abundantly adorned with notes of almond blossom and lilac, hay and grass, lemon and peach, all ensconced in a pleasing texture that balances resonant tautness and moderate lushness over a fair amount of limestone minerality. 12 percent alcohol. Very appealing for immediate consumption. Very Good+. About $15, representing Fine Value.
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Inama Vigneti di Foscarino 2012, Soave Classico. The color is pale gold, the bouquet a winsome amalgam of ginger and quince, lemon balm and almond blossom, roasted lemon and yellow plums, altogether deeply and broadly spicy. Fermentation occurs in used barriques with the wine racked to stainless steel vats for six months duration. A lovely moderately lush texture is animated by brisk acidity and a scintillating limestone element, the whole package being saline and savory, with a note of grapefruit bitterness on the finish. 12.5 percent alcohol. Now through 2015 or ’16. Excellent. About $24.
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Inama Vigneto du Lot 2011, Soave Classico. For this single-vineyard wine, fermentation and malolactic take place in standard barriques, 30 percent new oak barrels, for six months; the wine then goes into stainless steel vats for another six months. The color is radiant medium gold, while the bouquet offers a beguiling (yet slightly spare and austere) wreathing of almond skin and almond blossom, the dusty dry floral nature of acacia, spiced pear with a hint of peach; a few minutes in the glass bring in notes of lemongrass and greengage plum. The wine is leafy, wind-blown, saline in the mouth, layering citrus and stone-fruit flavors with damp limestone and flint and chiming acidity. 13 percent alcohol. Now through 2015 or ’16 with seafood risotto, fish stews, grilled salmon or swordfish. With its sleek tone and presence, this is certainly one of the two or three best Soave Classicos I have tasted. Excellent. About $30.
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The wines of the oddly named “The Furst …” label are produced in Kaysersberg — “the king’s city,” population about 2,800, birthplace of Albert Schweitzer — in Alsace. The Cave Vinicole de Kietzenheim-Kaysersberg is a small consortium of growers whose vineyards, usually three to five acres, are nestled in the foothills of the Vosges mountains. Overseen by one vineyard manager and one winemaker, the cooperative produces AOC Alsace wines from the typical grape varieties. The Furst … Pinot Blanc 2012, Vin d’Alsace, offers a pale straw-gold color and enticing aromas of roasted lemon and lemon balm, hay, jasmine, quince and ginger, with limestone and flint in the background. Though there’s a bare hint of sweetness on the palate initially, those dry mineral elements shoot to the fore and dominate the wine back through the lively finish. Nicely balanced citrus and stone-fruit flavors are animated by clean, bright acidity, while a lithe supple texture pleases the tongue. 12.5 percent alcohol. Now through 2015 as aperitif or with fish and other seafood dishes; fresh oysters would be perfect. Very Good+. I paid $16 in Memphis, Tennessee. Prices elsewhere start at about $12.

Imported by Eagle Eye Brands, Chicago. Image from vivino.com.

California’s Lodi AVA was approved in 1986, but grapegrowing and winemaking in the area, straight east from San Francisco (and southeast of Sacramento) at the north extreme of the San Joaquin Valley, go back to the middle of the 19th Century. Zinfandel is the grape especially associated with Lodi, home to a remarkable collection of “old vine” vineyards planted in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The AVA was expanded in 2002 to the south and west. Lodi is divided into seven sub-appellations, and if you have not heard of most of these rest easy, because I had not heard of them either: Alta Mesa (which I have seen on labels from Lee Family Farms); Borden Ranch; Clements Hills; Cosumnes River; Jahant; Mokelumne River; and Sloughhouse. Interestingly, these sub-appellations, the subject of a five-year investigation and evaluation process, were approved by the federal government at once, in August 2006.

As most wine regions are wont to do, Lodi is busily promoting itself and its “subs” as viable entities. One of the steps is the establishment of the Lodi Native Project, this year focusing on the Mokelumne River AVA. This area is characterized by an alluvial fan of sandy, well-drained soils and is a bit cooler than the other six sub-appellations. The idea is that six winemakers would take grapes from old vineyards, ranging from 1958 back to 1901, and make their wines using similar traditional and non-interventionist techniques, including naturally occurring yeasts; no new oak barrels or oak chips, dust or innerstaves; no acid manipulation; no addition of tannin, water or concentrate products; no must concentration or extraction measures; no filtering or fining. Obviously, the idea is to allow the vineyards themselves, their terroir, to be expressed through the wine. Indeed, we have six quite different zinfandels here, some lighter and more elegant and balanced, others treading the path of more density, floridness and higher alcohol. Though I prefer the former to the latter, the project is a fascinating glimpse into the history of a region and the styles of wine that individual vineyards can produce.

The package of six wines is available for $180 online at LodiNative.com or, if you’re in the area, at the Lodi Wine & Visitor Center.

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Lodi Native The Century Block Vineyard Zinfandel 2012, Mokelumne River. Fields Family Wines, Ryan Sherman, winemaker. Three acres, planted in 1905. 14 percent alcohol. (Sherman said in a private communication that the alcohol content on this wine is closer to 13.8 percent.) Medium ruby color; red and black currants, red and black cherries; briers and brambles, lightly dusted graphite; flavors in the mouth lean more toward blackberry and raspberry, hints of fruitcake, black tea and orange zest; dense and chewy yet sleek; borne by dusty, slightly leathery tannins and bright acidity; well-knit, polished, lithic finish. Beautifully-fashioned and poised zinfandel. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent.
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Lodi Native Marian’s Vineyard Zinfandel 2012, Mokelumne River. St. Amant Winery, Stuart Spencer, winemaker. 8.3 acres, planted in 1901. 14.5 percent alcohol. Radiant medium ruby hue; slightly fleshy and meaty, very spicy, smoke and ash, graphite; notes of roasted plums and cherries, potpourri, loam; after a few minutes, raspberries and blueberry tart; very dry, slightly grainy, raspy tannins; you feel the wood, not as new wood but as a supple shaping influence with hints of rosemary and tobacco; dry, fairly austere finish. A high-toned zinfandel, rather grave and dignified. Try from 2015 through 2018 or ’19. Excellent.
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Lodi Native Soucie Vineyard Zinfandel 2012, Mokelumne. M2 Wines, Layne Montgomery, winemaker. 14.5 percent alcohol. Grapes from the oldest part of the vineyard, planted in 1916. Intense dark ruby-purple with a magenta rim; bright, fruity, very spicy; rhubarb and blueberry. notes of macerated black currants and plums, and more cherry comes up gradually; a rich, warm, spicy mouthful of zinfandel; very dry, and you feel the robust tannins from mid-palate back, though the balance is resolved in perfect equilibrium; the 14.5 percent alcohol feels just right for this wine, a pivot, in a way, the gyroscope that keeps the even keel. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent.
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Lodi Native Trulux Vineyard Zinfandel 2012, Mokelumne. McCay Cellars, Michael J. McCay, winemaker. 14.6 percent alcohol. Vineyard planted in the 1940s. Dark ruby-purple color; deep, intense and concentrated, very spicy, earthy and loamy; a big mouthful of blackberries, blueberries and pomegranate, cloves and allspice, an element of fruitcake and oolong tea, and paradoxically, a sort of smoky cigarette paper fragility; still, beyond that nuance, this is a large-framed, dry, robustly tannic zinfandel, vibrant and resonant, that wears its oaken heart on its sleeve. Now through 2017 or ’19. Excellent, with slight reservations.
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Lodi Native Wegat Vineyard Zinfandel 2012, Mokelumne. Maley Brothers Vineyard, Chad Joseph, winemaker. 14.9 percent alcohol. 21 acres, planted in 1958, which seems like a youngster compared to some of these other vineyards. Dark ruby-purple color; ripe, rich and spicy; blueberry and boysenberry, slightly caramelized plums and rhubrab; fruitcake, soft and macerated raspberries; very dense and chewy, packed with baking spice, dusty graphite and black and blue fruit flavors; lots of tannic power, even rather austere in the area of structure but also a little jammy; fortunately a clean line of bright acidity keeps it honest. Now through 2017 or ’18. Very Good+.
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Lodi Native Noma Ranch Zinfandel 2012, Mokelumna. Macchia Wines, Tim Holdener, winemaker. 15.8 percent alcohol. 15 acres, planted in early 1900s. Opaque dark ruby-purple color; the ripest and fleshiest of these zinfandels, boysenberry, loganberry and tart raspberry, heaps of earthy briers and brambles; fruitcake and plum jam; very dry, on the finish reveals alcoholic heat and sweetness which on my palate throws the wine off-balance. Now — if this is yer cuppa tea — through 2016 or ’17. Very Good.
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