In referring to the French, the term “arrogant frog” is redundant, n’est-ce pas? Ha ha, just a little joke to introduce the Wine of the Day, the Arrogant Frog Rosé 2016, Pay d’Oc (nicknamed “Lily Pad Pink”), made from 100 percent syrah grapes for the Côté Mas label of Domaine Paul Mas. It’s interesting how grapes, like syrah and mourvèdre, that tend to produce big-hearted, two-fisted red wines, can also, in rosé mode, be fashioned into beverages of the utmost delicacy and subtlety. This one offers a lovely pale copper-pink hue and nuanced aromas of strawberries and raspberries with a hint of melon and notes of rose petals and floral-herbal meadowy elements. On the palate, a bit of peach comes into play, but this is mainly about ineffable red fruits and berries enlivened by brisk acidity and a touch of limestone minerality that comes to dominate the finish. Very refreshing and appealing and perfect for picnics and other outdoor adventures. Very Good+. About $10, a Verifiable Bargain.

Imported by Esprit du Vin, Boca Raton, Fla. A sample for review.

Fathers & Daughters Cellars only made its first wine in 2015, though the family, longtime owners of the Ferrington Vineyard in Mendocino County’s Anderson Valley, for many years sold primarily pinot noir grapes to such highly regarded labels as Williams-Selyam, Flowers and Arista. The winery represents a collaborative and multi-generational effort of the “fathers and daughters” in the family: Patriarch Kurt Schoeneman, his daughter Sarah, Sarah’s husband Guy Pacurar, their daughter, Ella, and Guy’s older daughter, Taylor. Winemaker is Phillip Baxter. I was mightily and sort of incrementally impressed with the trio of wines reviewed on this page today, particularly the limited production Ella’s Reserve Pinot Noir 2014, which any devotee of West Coast pinot noirs should search for diligently.

These wines were samples for review.
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First, a sort of jeu d’esprit of a lightly effervescent sparkling wine, the Fathers & Daughters Cellars Sarah’s Rustic Bubbles 2016, Anderson Valley. With no second fermentation in the bottle as is the case with most sparkling wines, including Champagne (or in tank, in the Charmat process), this delightful and intriguing wine is made in what in parts of France is called the methode ancestrale or methode rurale, that is, a young wine is bottled before all the residual sugar has transformed into alcohol, so the fermentation that continues in the bottle produces carbon dioxide, hence: bubbles. For this wine, the initial fermentation was in all neutral French oak barrels. Sarah’s Rustic Bubbles ’16 was made completely from chardonnay grapes, being, in reality, a blanc de blancs. The color is pale yellow-gold, animated by a steady but narrow stream of tiny, foaming bubbles; the bouquet is characterized by freshly cut lemons, ginger, cloves and seashell salinity; the whole effect is of light, delicate brightness, garden freshness, but exhibiting a touch of muscat’s foxy petrol nature and hints of peach, heather and chalk. 13.9 percent alcohol. Could be an essential Summer quaff, except that production was 100 cases. Contact the winery to see if the tasting room can ship you a few bottles. Very Good+. About $19.
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A blend of sauvignon blanc, gewurztraminer and chardonnay, the Father’s & Daughters “The Dance” 2016, Anderson Valley, is a perfect wine for Summer sipping. Fresh as a daisy, with a sort of fruit cocktail-pear compote quality, the wine offers a pale straw-gold color and a light, delicately sweet apple character touched by a broad floral nature and hints of straw and meadowy herbs and flowers. It’s a bit musky — the gewurztraminer speaking — and very dry from mid-palate back through the finish blithely furnished with notes of spiced peaches, quince, lemongrass and limestone minerality. 13.7 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018. This one really grew on me. Excellent. About $28.
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All right, the previously mentioned wines were attractive, interesting and entertaining, certainly worthy of attention. The Father’s & Daughters Ella’s Reserve Pinot Noir 2014, Anderson Valley, however, is something else, as in among the very best pinot noirs I have tasted this year, a wine of profound yet ineffable elegance and power. The grapes were hand-harvested, and fermentation was accomplished by native yeasts; the wine saw no new oak but aged 18 months in 30 percent once-used French barrels and 70 percent neutral barrels. The color is lovely limpid cherry shading to a delicate invisible rim; aromas of ripe black and red currants are permeated by notes of cloves and rose petals, cranberry and loam, beetroot and rhubarb. The wine is beautifully balanced and integrated, lithe, supple and satiny on the palate but pulling up a burgeoning tide of iodine and graphite, briers and brambles and a touch of flinty austerity; a few moments in the glass unfold elements of sandalwood and cherry compote. Energized by bright acidity, the wine delivers a long follow-through for the finish. 13.8 percent alcohol. Drink through 2020 to ’22. Production was 110 cases. Exceptional. About $42.
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Planning a picnic for this weekend? Or perhaps just a relaxing period on the porch or the patio? Or a few hours at dusk, sitting on the balcony or terrace, looking out over the darkening city? Any of these activities, of course, depending on the humidity and heat index, the latter of which in my neck o’ the woods is soaring to triple-digit records. In any case, a perfect wine to consider for these occupations is the Left Coast Cellars “The Orchards” Pinot Gris 2016, from Oregon’s Willamette Valley. Just the name sounds refreshing, doesn’t it? Orchard and meadow both embody the character of this pale straw-gold wine that was made completely in stainless steel to retain freshness and crisp appeal. The beguiling bouquet — an apt term — is woven of stone fruit, green tea and lemongrass, with hints of jasmine and camellia, lime peel and a sort of sun-dried herbal quality. The wine is sleek, lithe and supple on the palate, animated by lively acidity and a burgeoning tide of scintillating limestone minerality; a few moments in the glass unfurl notes of quince jam and crystallized ginger, heading toward a dry finish dominated by grapefruit rind and bracing sea-breeze salinity. A nicely moderate 13.7 percent alcohol. Drink into 2018 and bring on the chicken or shrimp salad, the cucumber and watercress sandwiches, the deviled eggs and other outdoor fare. Excellent. About $18.

A sample for review.


Hie thee, friends, to a retail store and buy by the case the Vega del Castillo Garnacha Cepas Viejas 2015, from the Spanish region of Navarra. Am I talking here about a profound wine with tremendous depth and dimension? No, I’m referring to very inexpensive wine that satisfies the palate and just about any occasion with admirable personality and economy. The cooperative whence the wine derived dates back to 1910, though it has seen many changes in the past 117 years, as so would you, Dear Reader. Winemaker was Charo Moriones. The color of this 100 percent varietal wine — garnacha, or grenache — is a penetrating black-ruby with a glowing violet rim; arresting aromas and flavors of blackberries, black currants and plums are infused with notes of loam, tar, leather and oolong tea, while a few minutes in the glass bring up touches of cloves, bitter chocolate and graphite. The texture is silken and supple, supported by bright acidity and slightly dusty, velvety tannins. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink through the end of 2018 with any dish of a creature-like nature, be it beast or fowl, especially prepared on a grill or in a cast-iron skillet. Very Good+. About — ready? — $8 a bottle, marking a Super Freak-Ass Bargain.

Importer unknown. A sample for review.

The question we have to ask about the grape variety kerner, is why anyone would want to create a hybrid between the noble riesling and the no-count trollinger. This crossing was accomplished in Germany in 1969, and producers being what they are, kerner was embraced for its character of high sugar content and high yields. It is found primarily in Pfalz and Rheinhessen. A careful winemaker with an eye to the proper soil, climate and vineyard practices can fashion a delightful and engaging wine, though, and such a winemaker is David Ramey, who started the Sidebar brand as a project to explore grapes not typically exploited under his well-known Ramey Cellars label. The Sidebar Kerner 2016 derives from the grape’s only planting in California, the Mokelumne Glen Vineyards in the Mokelumne River AVA in Lodi. The grapes ferment on natural yeasts, malolactic is supressed, and the wine rests three months sur lies in stainless steel. The color is pale straw-gold; this is crisp as a freshly-picked apple, offering notes of apple skin, lemon rind, spiced pear and lemon balm, with undertones of almond blossom, dried thyme, hay and hot stones. It feels, in other words, more like a Mediterranean manifestation than a Teutonic expression of the grape. Limestone minerality dominates the lithe, supple texture from mid-palate back through a bracing, spicy finish. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink through 2018 with light fish and seafood preparations, more delicate pasta and vegetarian dishes or as a charming and refreshing aperitif. Production was 193 cases, so mark this wine Worth a Search. Excellent. About $25.

A sample for review.

Doubtless white Burgundies of more profound depth and dimension are produced in the great appellations of Meursault, Puligny-Montrachet and Chassagne-Montrachet in the Côte de Beaune, but you would be hard-pressed to find one that offers a more beautiful expression of the chardonnay grape than the Domaine Marc Roy “Les Champs Perdrix” Marsannay 2015. The interesting point here is that Marsannay is the northernmost of Burgundy’s appellations, lying only 6 to 8 kilometers southwest of the city of Dijon. This is primarily red wine — that is to say, pinot noir — territory, as is true of the Côte de Nuits down past the city of Beaune. Chardonnay is a distinct minority in Marsannay — interestingly, pinot blanc is allowed — which is also the only appellation in Burgundy with its own designation for rosé. Domaine Marc Roy owns only four hectares of vines, just under 10 acres, which is minuscule even by Burgundian standards. Most of these are in Gevrey-Chambertin — no Grand Cru or Premier Cru vines — with a slim portion for the chardonnay in Marsannay; the estate is headquartered in Gevrey. Winemaker is fourth generation Alexandrine Roy. Grapes are hand-harvested; the wines ferment by natural yeasts and are given a very conservative oak regimen, this “Champs Perdrix” seeing only 10 percent new oak. The chardonnay vines are 40 years old.

The color is pale gold; at first, the wine delivers pure lemon in every respect, gradually adding an infusion of lime peel and heather, a hint of grapefruit, a touch of seashell; a lovely talc-like texture is riven by bright acidity that adds a keynote of crisp liveliness. The wine is quite dry, but juicy with slightly spiced and macerated pineapple and grapefruit flavors that take on a depth of loamy-damp ash earthiness and limestone-flint minerality; a few moments in the glass unfurl ethereal elements of jasmine, lilac and orange rind. 13 percent alcohol. We drank this bottle last night with seared salmon marinated in olive oil, lemon juice and soy sauce and given a coffee rub-urfa-and-maresh crust. The pairing was absolutely right. A beguiling and seductive model of varietal purity and intensity. Drink through 2020 or ’21. Excellent. About $50.

Production was seven barrels, about 175 cases, so mark this one Worth a Search. Purchased recently at Le Dû’s Wines in New York. The label image is one vintage behind. Imported by Michael Skurnik Wines, Syosset, N.Y.


We think of the cabernet franc grape as a fairly robust fellow, but the Gratien & Meyer Crémant de Loire Brut Rosé
turns it into something delicate and elegant. Made in the Champagne method of second fermentation in the bottle, this sparkling wine offers an entrancing, limpid pale salmon-copper hue animated by a steady stream of lively effervescence and subtle, beguiling aromas of strawberries and raspberries, rose petals and heather; on the palate, this is crisp, lithe and refreshing, unfurling notes of limestone minerality and seashell salinity under hints of dried currants, orange zest and lime peel; a slightly creamy texture balances the bright acidity and mineral element. 12 percent alcohol. A truly lovely, straightforward quaffer of a sparkling wine, made for immediate consumption as you relax on the porch or patio or lounge about the kitchen. I could drink this all Summer long. Very Good+. About $15, marking Good Value.

MW Imports, White Plains, N.Y. A sample for review.

Of the 55,000 acres planted to the gamay grape in Beaujolais, 15,000 — a hair over 27 percent — are dedicated to the Beaujolais-Villages appellation. The idea is that the wines at the peak of the Beaujolais pyramid, the Cru wines louis-jadot-beaujolais-villages-combe-aux-jacques-beaujolais-france-10731842derived from 10 villages allowed to attach their names to the label, are the most exclusive and the smallest production. The vast areas devoted to the regular Beaujolais designation, the pyramid’s broad base, are the most common. Our wine of the day is the proprietary Louis Jadot “Combe aux Jacques” Beaujolais-Villages 2015. A portion of the grapes derive from a vineyard in Régnié, one of the 10 Cru villages; another portion is purchased wine; and the third portion is from purchased grapes, all in the spirit of making a balanced, dependable, enjoyable wine. The color is dark ruby shading to a lighter magenta rim; the bouquet delivers the signature Beaujolais aromas of blackberries, currants and mulberries permeated by touches of loam, cloves and oolong tea. The wine is juicy and refreshing on the palate, satiny in texture, bolstered by bright acidity and heightened by notes of graphite and blueberries, leading to a clean, chiseled, fruit-and-mineral-laced finish. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drink with just about anything through the end of this year. Excellent. About $13, a local purchase, on sale from $16, representing Good Value.

Imported by Kobrand Wine and Spirits, Purchase, N.Y.

“Orange wine” became a category, a trend, an obsession in certain small circles 10 or 15 years ago. The concept of troonfermenting white grapes on the skins — hence the pale orange color — runs contrary to the usual practice, in which the juice and skins are whisked away from each other, so the wine takes on the familiar hues of pale or medium straw or gold. Fermenting white grapes on the skins, about which a great deal of ink was spilled or keyboards mangled for a fervent period of time, seems to have lost its controversial and partisan allure, so winemakers can decide to make an orange wine without subscribing to a list of demands or pledging allegiance to a philosophy laid down by fanatical critics. For those consumers who have never tried an orange wine, I offer today the Troon Vineyard Whole Grape Ferment Riesling 2016, from Oregon’s Applegate Valley appellation. Foot-trod, fermented with native yeasts, the wine — Troon’s first venture into orangeness — spent a bare three months in neutral French oak barrels. It’s unlike any riesling you ever encountered. The color is a kind of pale copper-topaz hue; at first, the wine is pure apples and in fact smells rather like cider; then it expands with notes of orange rind and spiced pear and a sherry-like tendency toward cloves and roasted/salted almonds. The wine is quite dry, animated by brisk acidity, and organized around a structure that while delicate and lithe feels almost tannic. From mid-palate back through the finish, it’s dominated by elements of quince marmalade infused with ginger, candied grapefruit rind and a touch of green olive. 12 percent alcohol. Not intended to make old bones, this unique wine should be consumed by the end of 2017. Winemaker was Steve Hall. Try with tapas and other salty and savory appetizers. Excellent. About $20, representing Good Value.

A sample for review.

Why shouldn’t Merrie Old England produce world-class sparkling wines? In some spots the climate and soil seem perfect gusbornefor the job. One of those places is Kent, the county that starts at the outskirts of Greater London and spreads southeast to encompass that area of the scepter’d isle closest to France, just across the Channel. The grounding here is chalk — think white cliffs of Dover — and the climate maritime. I’ll confess that the Gusborne Brut Reserve 2013 is the first sparkling wine from England that I have tried, and to say that I’m impressed would be understatement. I could imbibe these bubbles all day long. The blend is 55 percent pinot noir, 27 percent pinot meunier and 18 percent chardonnay; the base wine fermented in stainless steel tanks with a small percentage in old oak barriques. This sparkling wine aged a minimum of 36 months on the lees. The color is very pale gold, animated by a frothing shimmer of tiny glinting bubbles; beguiling aromas of fresh apples, lemons and back-notes of macerated red berries are strung on a steel thread; hints of lemon drop and spare grapefruit bitterness bolster a palate characterized by chalk, flint and seashell salinity and bright, incisive acidity. Altogether elegant, approachable and delightful. 12 percent alcohol. Winemaker was Charlie Holland. Drink through 2020 to ’23. Excellent. About $40, a local purchase.

Imported by Broadbent Selections, Richmond, Va.

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