Wine of the Week



It’s not easy to make an inexpensive pinot noir wine that feels authentic, but James Ewart, winemaker of Delicato’s Noble Vines label, did just that with the Noble Vines 667 Pinot Noir 2012, Monterey County. The majority of the grapes derive from the Indelicato family’s estate San Bernabe Vineyard, with additional dollops from Monterey’s Santa Lucia Highlands and Arroyo Seco AVAs. The color is a limpid medium ruby hue; enticing aromas of macerated black cherries and plums are highlighted by notes of cloves and sassafras and hints of cranberry and pomegranate; a few minutes in the glass bring up touches of leather and violets. The texture is satiny but with a nice rasp of oak and graphite, and the wine pulls up surprisingly substantial tannins for firmness and a bit of austerity. Bright acidity keeps the wine lively and engaging, as do the modestly ripe and spicy black and red fruit flavors. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2015 or ’16. Very good+. About $15.

A sample for review.

The Nieto Senetiner Torrontes 2013, from the Valle de Cafayate in Argentina’s Salta region, is exactly the kind of wine that the grape should make. Not overly floral or cloying, not excessively acidic, not glammed up with oak, just very fresh and appealing but offering an intriguing spare, almost austere character. Salta is an oddly shaped region in the country’s far northwest, like the piece of the jigsaw puzzle that you always lose; part of it touches Chile, while another part reaches around to abut Paraguay. This is a dry, high elevation vineyard area, with cultivation from about 1,200 to almost 5,000 feet above sea-level. The color of the Nieto Senetiner Torrontes 2013 is pale gold; lovely notes of rose petal and lilac, greengage, quince and ginger are tempered by lime peel and grapefruit for an effect that’s both sensual and astringent. Made all in stainless steel tanks, the wine displays clean, vibrant acidity and a scintillating limestone element in a texture that’s almost powdery or talc-like on the palate but a little chiseled too; flavors of tangerine and peach are subtly permeated by hints of dried thyme and almond. The finish is cool, crisp and minerally. 13.5 percent alcohol. I don’t want to oversell this wine — it reveals no great depth or dimension — but it’s certainly a superior version of the grape and one of the best I have tasted. We enjoyed it with a pasta of roasted chicken, capers, preserved lemon and broccoli. Now through 2015. Very Good+. The price? About $11, making it a Fantastic Bargain. Buy it by the case.

Imported by Foley Family Wines, Sonoma, Calif. A sample for review.


Oddly enough, I haven’t written about Tres Picos Borsao since the 2005 vintage, a situation I now remedy because it’s one of the world’s great wine bargains. Made from 100 percent garnacha (or grenache) grapes in Spain’s Campo de Borja region, Tres Picos Borsao 2012 aged a few months half in stainless steel, half in French oak barrels. The color is intense dark ruby; aromas of ripe red and black currants and plums are permeated by notes of graphite and cloves, briers and brambles. On the palate, the wine is rich, spicy and dense, enlivened by spanking acidity and framed by moderately grainy, chewy tannins; a few moments in the glass add touches of black olives, smoked tea and dried rosemary to the savory red and black fruit flavors. This is vivacious without being flirty and robust without being rustic; it would be perfect with grilled chorizo sausages, leg of lamb, roasted peppers and such. Alcohol content not available. Drink now through 2015 or ’16. Very Good+. About $17, representing Great Value, and seen as low as $13 or $14.

A Jorge Ordoñez Selection, tasted at a local distributor’s event.

I haven’t chosen a pinot grigio as Wine of the Week since sometime in February 2012, the primary reason being that this space is reserved for products that offer distinction, class, style and, usually, value. Many pinot grigios indeed don’t cost much, but they tend to fall down in the areas of style, class and distinction. An exception to that rule is the Livon Pinot Grigio 2013, Collio, from Italy’s northeastern province of Friuli-Venezia Giulia. Made all in stainless steel, this pinot grigio offers a pale straw-gold color with a faint green overlay; aromas of almond, almond skin, roasted lemon and lemon balm are highlighted by notes of lemongrass, verbena, nutmeg and a bracing sort of salt-marsh aura. No inconsequential or innocuous little quaffer, the Livon Pinot Grigio 2013 delivers a fairly dense texture that supports lemon, spiced pear and yellow plum flavors enlivened by incisive acidity and decisive crystalline limestone minerality. The whole package resonates with expressive savory and saline qualities that lift the wine above the ordinary; the finish is elegant and a bit austere. 12.5 percent alcohol. Now through 2015 with shrimp risotto, broiled trout with lemon and capers, clam spaghetti, that sort of thing. Excellent. About $17, representing Good Value.

Imported by Angelini Selections, Centerbrook, Conn. A sample for review.

The wines of the oddly named “The Furst …” label are produced in Kaysersberg — “the king’s city,” population about 2,800, birthplace of Albert Schweitzer — in Alsace. The Cave Vinicole de Kietzenheim-Kaysersberg is a small consortium of growers whose vineyards, usually three to five acres, are nestled in the foothills of the Vosges mountains. Overseen by one vineyard manager and one winemaker, the cooperative produces AOC Alsace wines from the typical grape varieties. The Furst … Pinot Blanc 2012, Vin d’Alsace, offers a pale straw-gold color and enticing aromas of roasted lemon and lemon balm, hay, jasmine, quince and ginger, with limestone and flint in the background. Though there’s a bare hint of sweetness on the palate initially, those dry mineral elements shoot to the fore and dominate the wine back through the lively finish. Nicely balanced citrus and stone-fruit flavors are animated by clean, bright acidity, while a lithe supple texture pleases the tongue. 12.5 percent alcohol. Now through 2015 as aperitif or with fish and other seafood dishes; fresh oysters would be perfect. Very Good+. I paid $16 in Memphis, Tennessee. Prices elsewhere start at about $12.

Imported by Eagle Eye Brands, Chicago. Image from vivino.com.


LL coated a thick swordfish steak with tapenade and seared it in the cast-iron skillet to medium rare. I pulled the cork on the Condes de Albarei Albariño 2012, Rias Baixas, and we were fit as a fiddle and ready for fun. Rias Baixas is a vineyard area in the province of Galicia, in northwest Spain. The company is a cooperative that gathers grapes from many dedicated member-growers in Val do Salnés, usually considered the region’s best area because of the essential maritime influence, and indeed the wine is a fresh and bracing as a sea-breeze. The color is very pale gold; aromas of roasted lemons and yellow plums are woven with notes of quince and ginger, lime peel and grapefruit. A racy, lacy limestone element and pert acidity keep the wine lively and energetic, with citrus and stone-fruit flavors taking on savory and saline qualities. 13 percent alcohol. Drink through 2015. Very Good+. About $14, representing Great Value.

Various importers. A sample for review.

Here’s a white wine from Sicily that will serve you well in a variety of functions, whether as aperitif, as a picnic quaff or with meals based on seared or roasted fish and other seafood dishes like shrimp risotto or cod stew. It’s the Stemmari Dalila 2012, Bianco Terre Siciliane, a blend of 80 percent grillo grapes, indigenous to the island that gets kicked by the toe of the Italian boot, and 20 percent viognier, occurring more usually in France’s Rhone Valley. The grillo sees only stainless steel, while the viogner is aged in new French oak barrels. The color of this engaging wine is pale gold with a slight green shimmer; there’s a burst of sea-breeze and salt marsh, bracing and enlivening, with notes of roasted lemons, spiced pears, almond blossom and dried rosemary; under all this lingers a hint of orange rind and pine. For the price — or any price — the tone and presence are lovely and impressive, with attractive poise between crisp acidity and a cloud-like texture and tasty citrus and stone-fruit flavors. A touch of limestone minerality bristles in the finish. Drink through 2015. Director of winemaking for Stemmari is Lucio Matricardi. Very Good+, edging toward Excellent. About $14, representing Great Value.

Prestige Wine Imports, New York. A sample for review. Image from isaacjamesbaker.blogspot.com.

You couldn’t ask for a more appealing quaffer in a white wine than the Bila-Haut 2013, Côtes du Roussillon Blanc, from the stable of Michel Chapoutier. Roussillon, the sunniest spot in France, nestles against the eastern slopes of the Pyrenees, just across from Spain, which nestles against the western flanks. Indeed, the region of Roussillon, ruled by the kings of Majorca and then Aragon centuries ago, shares a heritage that makes it almost more Spanish than French, including a tradition of bull-fighting. This wine is a blend of grenache blanc grapes, grenache gris, vermentino (here called rolle) and macabeo (known in Spain as viura); it offers a very pale gold color and winsome aromas of jasmine and almond blossom, spiced pear and yellow plum with a hint of peach, and notes of ginger, quince and flint. Mildly spicy stone-fruit flavors are highlighted by savory, briny qualities that balance nicely on a stream of pert acidity and a gently lush texture; a strain of limestone minerality plays out through the spare, almost elegant finish. 13.5 percent alcohol. We drank this wine quite happily with seared coho salmon and a mixture of sauteed bok choy and red peppers. Now through 2015. Very Good+. About $13, representing Great Value.

R. Shack Selections, HB Wine Merchants, New York. A sample for review.

Just six weeks ago I made the Flora Springs Chardonnay 2012, Napa Valley the Wine of the Week, and, darn it, I can’t help but put the Flora Springs Soliloquy Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc 2013, Oakville, in the same spot today. The grapes derive from a two-block proprietary vineyard in Napa Valley’s Oakville District AVA, and, in fact, the vineyard receives more prominent display on the label than the grape variety does. Is that device helpful to consumers? Probably not, but it makes for a very elegant and typographically balanced label, one that matches the balance and elegance of the wine. Thoughtful work by winemaker Paul Steinauer puts the wine through seven months in a combination of concrete and stainless steel tanks, oak barrels and steel drums, the result being a sauvignon blanc of unusually appealing texture, subtlety and suppleness, as well as being fresh and crisp. The color is very pale gold, almost invisible; aromas of apple peel and lime peel are woven with lemon balm and lemongrass and back-notes of celery seed, hay, fennel and thyme. Brisk acidity energizes what is otherwise a sleek and suave sauvignon blanc that encompasses stone-fruit and citrus flavors enmeshed with hints of cloves, freshly-mown grass and pink grapefruit. The finish engages the palate with a touch of grapefruit bitterness and an unexpected feral tang. 14.2 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2015 as a delightful aperitif or with grilled or roasted salmon or swordfish. Excellent. About $25.

A sample for review.

Gewurztraminer might not be as off-putting to so many people if its name were changed to Steve or Samantha, but there it is, a grape that can be made into one of the most beautiful wines in the world with a name that is almost unpronounceable. So be it. Gewurztraminer thrives in Alsace, where France nestles uneasily against Germany, and to some extent in the northeastern Italian region of Alto Adige, in the Tyrol Alps just south of Austria. There are outposts in other countries, such as Australia and New Zealand, and also in the states of Oregon and California, and it’s to the latter that we turn for today’s Wine of the Week, the Gundlach Bundschu Estate Vineyard Gewurztraminer 2013, Sonoma Coast. The vineyard lies at a fairly low elevation in the southwestern foothills of the Mayacamas range. Ninety percent of this clean, fresh, crisp wine was made in stainless steel, the rest in neutral oak barrels. The color is very pale gold; aromas of rose petals, lychee and spiced pear are highlighted by notes of white pepper, peach and lime peel, all subtly and delicately woven. Acidity is essential to the success of gewurztraminer — as in any wine, truly — to balance the potentially overpowering floral and fruity elements, and this example has acidity in spades, a factor that contributes to its appealing liveliness and its deft poise. Citrus and stone-fruit meld seamlessly in the mouth, while the spicy, limestone-laced finish brings in a hint of grapefruit pith bitterness, savory, astringent and exciting. 14.3 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2019 to ’22 with — I know this is the cliche — moderately spicy Thai or Vietnamese cuisine, with grilled shrimp or mussels, with seafood risotto. Excellent. About $22.50.

A sample for review.

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