Uncategorized


In the past three days, the friendly, if not incredulous, UPS and FedEx drivers have traveled numerous times to my threshold, delivering wines for review. Almost five cases in fact. A similar circumstance prevailed last week. That’s a lot of wine, and I’m sure you understand that there’s already an enormous amount of wine in the house.

It’s easy to understand why so much vinous product is being sent to me now. The weather is perfect, neither frigid nor torrid, so wine will not be ruined during its passage, typically from the West Coast or the Northeast. I’m certain that wine reviewers exist who receive more wine than I do, but I’ll admit that the amount of wine currently stacking up chez Koeppel is overwhelming. I know, I know, unsympathetic readers are muttering, “Oh, gee, poor guy, having to drink all that free wine,” as if I actually consume the contents of every bottle and as if every wine delivered to my door is a Grand Cru Burgundy, First Growth Bordeaux or vintage Champagne. (Full disclosure: It never is.)

The idea, of course, is to taste the wine, not scarf it down, though I tend to save the best or most interesting wines for dinner. The sordid truth is most of the wine gets tasted in the kitchen, in a fairly rigid swirl-sniff-sip/spit-swallow-spit ritual and the rest of the product gets poured — oh, the horror! — into the sink. That’s the way it’s done, folks.

How do I decide what wines go through the process? As with most matters in life, there’s a hierarchy. Here, then, is an outline of how the wines I taste and write about are arranged on the priority scale. Pay heed.

1. The wines I give most attention to are those that are sent after a winery or importer’s representative or marketing person sends me an email asking if I would be interested in tasting such and such wines and may they send them to me. It helps that the wines in question embody great quality or reputation or have an intriguing geographical, historical or personal background or story. (I don’t need the whole story in that email.)

2.Second in priority are wines that arrive, whether after inquiry or not, from wineries or producers with whom I have a long record of tasting and writing about their wines.

3. Third in line are wines that arrive unheralded but that seem promising in terms of their history, heritage, geographical significance or grape make-up or that fit into whatever my present wine-tasting mode is. Yes, friends, it’s a crap-shoot.

4. Finally, down here, is the slough of plonk that makes me wonder if people who send out wine ever read this blog.

Will every wine I receive be reviewed on BTYH? Nosiree, the world does not hold enough time and space for me to accomplish that feat. In fact, I encourage people who submit wines for my perusal to remember that just as newspapers do not review all the books they are sent, so do wine writers not review all the wines delivered to their doors. Book reviewers plead eyesight; we plead the health of our livers.

I’ll admit that it’s gratifying to open a wine sent anonymously, as it were, and discover true greatness or, alternatively, true decent quaffability. In an ideal world, though, I’d like prior notice.

My Readers — I’m pleased, O.K., thrilled, to announce that BiggerThanYourHead won Best Reviews on a Wine Blog from the annual Wine Blog Awards for the third time, adding 2013 to the awards of 2009 and 2010. I’ll admit that I was becoming cynical about my efforts, my talents and writing abilities, just because, I suppose, there are so many blogs out there that review wine and assay commentary on the wine industry, that the whole endeavor, bloggers as well as audience, is getting younger, and because I thought my voice was too well known to merit much interest. So I’m doubly thrilled that people voted for this blog and for the concept of what I do here, and that is to write about individual wines and groups of wines in a way that peels back the wine to get at its essence, its heart, and to place that wine (or those wines) as much as possible in a historical, geographical, personal and technical context. Heartened by this award, I will continue to produce the same kinds of reviews and stories that I have written since this blog was launched in December 2006 and since my first print column was published in July 1984. Yep, I’m a veteran, but that doesn’t mean that I don’t love wine and all the ideas and nuances that surround each great bottle. Here’s to you, My Readers, for your confidence in me, your patience and your appreciation. Cheers, and remember always to drink sensibly and in moderation.


Dear Readers: Again this blog has been named a finalist in the Best Wine Review Blog category in the Wine Blog Awards. If you appreciate what I do here and profit from the approach I take in terms of writing about and describing wines and providing background information of a historical, geographical, technical and philosophical nature, then I in turn would appreciate your vote. Here’s a link to the awards page: http://wineblogawards.org/from-the-organizers/the-finalists-in-the-2013-wine-blog-awards-are-announced/

Thanks for your confidence and for your readership.

I made the Toad Hollow “Eye of the Toad” Dry Rosé of Pinot Noir 2012 my Wine of the Week on March 19. Now it’s the turn of the Toad Hollow Erik’s the Red Proprietary Red Wine 2011, which carries a general “California” designation. Pour quoi? Because the zinfandel and petite sirah grapes for this robust blend came from Lodi, the syrah and malbec from Central Coast, and the dolcetto from Mendocino County. I have a great deal of fondness for this winery that delivers well-made wines at prices sometimes far below what could be asked if quality were the criterion; in other words, Toad Hollow turns out authentic and drinkable wines at great prices. The last Erik’s I reviewed was the 2009; the blend for that wine was primarily merlot, cabernet sauvignon and zinfandel with dabs of souza, tannat, syrah and petite sirah. A different roster of grapes, however, has not changed this wine’s defining characteristic, a combination of attractive rusticity and bumptiousness with full-throttle dark and spicy black and blue fruit flavors and fine detailing of acid, tannin and mineral elements. The color is dark ruby-mulberry; the bouquet teems with notes of black currants, plums and blueberries with hints of mocha, black tea, black olives and pepper. The wine is lively and vibrant, moderately dense and chewy and bursting with ripe, slightly roasted and macerated black cherries, raspberries and currants; a wash of earthy briery-brambly-graphite completes the finish. 13.9 percent alcohol. Great for barbecue ribs, grilled pork chops and steaks or hearty pasta dishes, through the end of 2013. Very Good+. About $15.

A sample for review.

Boy, a lot of people blog about wine. If there were a conference of people who blogged about watches or sailboats or sandwiches or collecting Hummel elves would there be so many? By many I mean about 375, so, sure, that’s a drop in the wine barrel compared to bloggers that concern themselves with national affairs or neo-nazi hate music, but when you see all of these eager shining faces gathered in one place (with their computers, iPads, electronic notebooks and phones), it’s rather overwhelming.

So, here we are at the Doubletree hotel in Portland, Oregon, on what I can’t help thinking is the wrong side of the river from Downtown. The schedule is filled each day with myriad activities, including, yesterday, visits to wineries in the Willamette Valley — everyone piles into buses and isn’t told where they’re going until the buses take off — and today sessions of discussions on various aspects of blogging about wine, including what I’m sure will be an eagerly attended panel about monetizing our efforts instead of endlessly laboring on our blogs for the sake of free wine, a privilege that’s gratifying indeed but doesn’t pay the bills. Later today occur the announcement of the winners of the Wine Blog Awards — keep your fingers crossed for Your Truly in the Best Writing category — and a banquet hosted by King Estate.

What I discovered is that a huge amount of ex officio activities take place, mainly in the form of tastings put on by different wineries and trade groups. Some of these events occur during the day, but most of them fall after hours, by which I mean that they start at 10 p.m. and go on until after midnight. Last night I finally turned in my glass and closed by notebook at 12:15 a.m., after having gone to five tastings — including one that was shut down by hotel security for being too loud — but I know that other people stayed up much later. I can only do what I can do, n’est-ce pas?

I’ll get to the details of some of these tasting events in a few days; I don’t want to neglect some of the spectacular wines that I tried, many of which were new to me, but right now I have to hurry off to breakfast off-site to meet a winery person and then get back to the Doubletree for the first discussion meetings.

Let me add, though, a final observation, and that is that attending a conference like this tends to put things in perspective. You can imagine how gratifying it is to be told by a winery person or importer that “we send you wines because you’re one of the top ten wine bloggers” — yeah, I liked that! — or to have fellow bloggers come up to me and say things like “I’ve been reading your blog forever” or “I’ve always wanted to meet you” or, at least, “Oh, I follow you on Twitter.” And yet just as many times, on introducing myself to let’s say someone who has been to every Wine Bloggers’ Conference, the response is a stare or nod of polite incomprehension. We are never as important as we think we are.


My Readers, beginning tomorrow through Sunday, I’ll be posting to this blog and to Twitter and Facebook from the 2012 Wine Bloggers’ Conference in Portland, Oregon. The roster of activities and tastings and discussions, as well as after-hours tastings set up by various wineries and importers — these occur from 10 p.m. until midnight — is awesome. The weather in Portland is unseasonably warm, so I won’t be getting the relief from the hideous heat in Memphis that I thought I would, but I’m taking shorts and sandals for comfort. I’ll get back to posting as soon as I can. The winners of the Wine Blog Awards will be announced Saturday night; keep your fingers crossed for this blog in the Best Writing category.

Metrokane, founded in 1983 by Riki Kane and headquartered in New York, is well-known for its Rabbit® line of sleek and widely advertised wine bottle openers and other accessories, but what I urge My Readers to acquire are the incredibly low-tech, remarkably inexpensive yet highly efficient bottle stoppers. The problem has plagued wine drinkers since the first waiter opened an amphora and poured a beaker of wine for a patron in, oh, 463 B.C.: How do you keep the rest of the wine fresh in the bottle for the next few days? Now, of course, restaurants have costly systems for keeping their wine-by-the-glass bottles viable, but the home consumer can’t indulge in such mechanisms; all we want is a simple device that will keep the sparkle going in a bottle of Champagne or retain the quality of a bottle of red or white wine so we can enjoy them for more than one fleeting occasion.

I did not receive these fairly cute little objects as review samples, nor did Metrokane ask me to endorse them. In fact, this post marks the first time that I have mentioned any kind of product other than a beverage on BiggerThanYourHead since its inception in December 2006. LL bought a pair of these Rabbit bottle stoppers at Bed Bath and Beyond. The suggested retail price is a mere $4 a pair.

We drank half a bottle of Besserat de Bellefon Cuvee des Moines Brut Champagne on the evening of June 12th for LL’s birthday. I jammed one of the Rabbit bottle stoppers in it and stuck it in the fridge, and we left for vacation the next day.

Last night, July 6 — 24 days later — I pulled the stopper out of the bottle with a distinct “POP!” and poured us each a flute of the Champagne. It was lovely; it displayed a fine bead of tiny bubbles, no, not the fountain of bubbles it offered more than three weeks previously, but delightful and effervescent nonetheless, and it tasted just fine, thank you very much. And we drank the rest of the bottle.

I have tried many sorts of bottle stoppers; sometimes it seems as if I have tried every kind. All failed eventually.

These little devices are so simple that they seem almost counter-intuitive. Point is: They work.

Choosing my 25 Great Wine Bargains of 2011 was even more difficult than selecting the 50 Great Wines of 2011. Are inexpensive wines getting better? Certainly the past decade has seen marked improvement in the under-$20 category in wines we see from Spain, Portugal, Italy and Argentina and, to a lesser extent Chile, as well as a proliferation of inexpensive wines from hitherto unexplored regions of France; Australia, I’m sorry to say, has largely found itself outclassed, though I have included a couple on this list. The breakdown here, including the rosé supplement, is France 9, California 8, Argentina 3, Chile, Italy and Australia with 2 each, Spain, Austria and New Zealand with 1 each.

The number I choose every year, “25 Great Wine Bargains,” is arbitrary, of course, and I fudged a bit this year with the rosés, so why not 50? Well, I dunno. In a way, 25 is a reasonable limitation because it makes me concentrate and go back over the reviews and notes to determine what wines really impressed me as being “Great Bargains” in terms of character, personality and quality/price ration. It all comes down to shades and degrees and nuances. If two similar wines are priced at $14 and $15 and both rated Very Good+, obviously the $14 wines gets precedence; if two similar wines are priced $15 and one rated Very Good+ and the other rated Excellent, well, you could be as looped as Puff the Magic Dragon and know that the wine with the Excellent rating snags a berth.

In a way, or perhaps in every way, this roster of “25 Great Wine Bargains of 2011″ is more significant than the “50 Great Wines of 2011,” because far more people would pay $18 for a bottle of wine than $80, with the $10 to $14 points being all-important. So go for it, have fun, drink up, but with caution, of course. Prices range from $9 to $19.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1. Apaltagua Reserva Unoaked Chardonnay 2010, Casablanca Valley, Chile. Very Good+. About $11.

2. Bindi Sergardi 2008, Chianti Colli Senesi, Italy. “Chianti from the hills of Siena.” Very Good+. About $15.

3. Carlton Cellars Cannon Beach Pinot Gris 2010, Willamette Valley, Oregon. Excellent. About $18.

4. Chante Cigale l’Apostrophe 2009, Vin de Pays Méditerranée. 70 percent grenache, 20 percent cinsault, 10 percent syrah. Excellent. About $16.

5. Chateau l’Escart Cuvée Eden 2009, Bordeaux Supérieur. 60 percent merlot, 30 percent cabernet sauvignon, 10 percent malbec. Very Good+. About $15.

6. Colomé Torrontés 2010, Calchagua, Salta, Argentina. Excellent. About $15.

7. Clos de los Siete 2009, Uco Valley, Mendoza, Argentina. 57 percent malbec, 15 percent merlot, 15 percent cabernet sauvignon, 10 percent syrah, 3 percent petit verdot. Excellent. About $18.

8. Les Deux Rives Corbiéres Blanc 2010, Corbiéres, France. Very Good+. About $10.

9. Paul Durdilly “Les Grandes Coasses” Vieilles Vignes Beaujolais 2009, Beaujolais, France. Excellent. About $17.

10. Evohé Viña Viejas Garnacha 2009. Vino de la Tierra del Baja Aragon, Spain. Very Good+. About $12.

11. Frisk Prickly Riesling 2011, Victoria, Australia. Very Good+. About $11.

12. Henry’s Drive Morse Code Chardonnay 2010, Padthaway, South Australia. Very Good+. About $9.

13. Highflyer Grenache Blanc 2008, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $17.

14. Hugel et Fils “Hugel” Cuvée Les Amours Pinot Blanc 2008. Alsace. Excellent. About $15.

15. Kendall-Jackson Avant Chardonnay 2009, California. K-J’s foray into “unoaked” territory. Very Good+. About $14.

16. Morgan Winery R. & D. Franscioni Vineyard Pinot Gris 2010, Santa Lucia Highlands, Monterey. Excellent. About $18

17. Mount Beautiful Riesling 2009, Cheviot Hills, North Canterbury, New Zealand. Excellent. About $19.

18. Napa Station Chardonnay 2008, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $16.

19. Domaine des Rozets 2009, Coteaux du Tricastin, France. 65 percent grenache, 35 percent syrah, 5 percent cinsault. Very Good+. About $12.

20. San Huberto Bonarda 2009, La Rioja, Argentina. Very Good+. About $11.

21. Santa Digna Carmenére Reserva 2008, Valle Central, Chile. Very Good+. About $10.

22. Sella & Mosca La Cala 2009, Vermentino di Sardegna, Italy. Very Good+. About $12.

23. Steelhead Pinot Noir 2009, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $15.

24. X Winery X Red 2009, North Coast. 52 percent syrah, 19 percent mourvedre, 17 percent zinfandel, 12 percent grenache. Very Good+. About $15.

25. Zantho Blaufränkisch 2008, Burgenland, Austria. Very Good+. About $14.

Et les rosés:

1. Chateau des Annibals “Suivez-moi-jeune-homme” 2010, Coteaux Varois en Provence. Excellent. About $19.

2. Benessere Rosato 2010, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $16.

3. Bonny Doon Vin Gris de Cigare 2010, Central Coast. Excellent. About $15.

4. Mas de la Dame “Rosé du Mas” 2010, Les Baux de Provence, France. Excellent. About $15.

5. Domaine du Tariquet Rosé de Pressée 2010, Vin de Pays des Côtes de Gasgogne, France. 30 percent merlot, 30 percent cabernet franc, 25 percent syrah, 15 percent tannat. Excellent. About $12.

Selecting my 50 Great Wines of the year always requires soul-searching and concentrated thought. After several days of these headache-inducing activities, somewhat assuaged by drinking great wine, here’s the list. Notice that my title is “50 Great Wines of 2011.” I don’t say “the greatest” or the “best,” because this roster arises, naturally, only from wines that I tasted and wrote about in 2011; it doesn’t reflect the state of the entire vast bewildering world of wine out there, but just what I experienced. I’ll admit that when I peruse the lists of best wines or most exciting wines or whatever printed in the Wine Spectator or the Wine Enthusiast or Wine & Spirits, I become somewhat downcast at how many “best” or “exciting” wines I didn’t taste. I am, however, only one man, and I have a living to make outside the realm of this blog.

So here are my 50 Great Wines, and by great I mean not only that they pleased me immensely and intensely but that they possess something so special in the way of personality and character and authenticity that they register on a higher plane than the stuff that’s just tasty and enjoyable, though there’s nothing wrong with those wines, either, everything depends on time and space and circumstance. California dominates this roster, but there are also wines from Oregon, Italy, France, Germany, Spain, Argentina and Australia.

You’ll notice that the venerable Napa Valley winery Grgich Hills Estate appears on this list thrice, each time for a wine that rates Exceptional. For that reason, and for incredible dedication, hard work and integrity, for believing in balance and integration and varietal character yet allowing each wine to speak for itself, for transitioning to biodynamic practices without making a big freakin’ deal about it, and for always making wines that I love, Grgich Hills is my Winery of the Year.

Coming in a few days: “25 Great Wine Bargains.”

No hierarchy here; the order is strictly alphabetical.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1. Angela Clawson Creek Vineyard Pinot Noir 2008, Oregon (though the vineyard lies on Savannah Ridge in the Yamhill-Carlton District of the Willamette Valley). Excellent. About $50.

2. Arnaldo-Caprai Montefalco Rosso 2007, Montefalco, Umbria, Italy. 70 percent sangiovese, 15 percent sagrantino, 15 percent merlot. Excellent. About $23.

3. Barda Pinot Noir 2010, Patagonia, Argentina. Excellent. About $30.

4. Bastianich Tocai Plus 2006, Colli Orientali del Friuli. Exceptional. About $60.

5. Black Kite Cellars River Turn Block Pinot Noir 2009, Anderson Valley, Mendocino. 160 cases. Exceptional. About $52.

6. Domaine Carneros Le Rêve Blanc de Blancs Brut 2004, Carneros. Exceptional. About $85.

7. Catena Zapata Adrianna Vineyard Malbec 2007, Mendoza, Argentina. 350 cases. Exceptional. About $120.

8. Chateau Doisy-Védrines 2005, Sauternes, Bordeaux, France. Excellent. About $45-$50.

9. Colomé Estate Malbec 2009, Calchaqui Valley, Salta, Mendoza. Excellent. About $25.

10. Drouhin-Vaudon Chalbis Réserve de Vaudon 2009, Chablis, France. Excellent. About $27.50.

11. Far Niente Chardonnay 2009, Napa Valley. Exceptional. About $58.

12. Fontanelle Cabernet Sauvignon 2008, Mount Veeder, Napa Valley. 750 cases. Exceptional. About $52.

13. Godspeed Vineyard Chardonnay 2008, Mount Veeder, Napa Valley. About $25.

14. Grant Eddie Syrah 2006, Whitman’s Mountain Vineyard, Sierra Foothills. 150 cases. Exceptional. About $27.

15. Grgich Hills Estate Cabernet Sauvignon 2007, Napa Valley. Exceptional. About $60.

16. Grgich Hills Estate Chardonnay 2008, Napa Valley. Exceptional. About $42.

17. Grgich Hills Estate Fume Blanc 2008, Napa Valley. Exceptional. About $30.

18. Hess Collection Mount Veeder Cabernet Sauvignon 2007, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $48.

19. Tenuto di Biserno Insoglio 2008, Toscano I.G.T. 32 percent each merlot and syrah, 30 percent cabernet franc, 6 percent petit verdot. Excellent. About $32.

20. Jake-Ryan Cellars Bald Mountain Vineyard Zinfandel 2007, Mount Veeder, Napa Valley. 410 cases. Excellent. About $28.

21. Kapcsándy Endre 2008, Yountville, Napa Valley. 51 percent cabernet sauvignon, 25 percent merlot, 16 percent cabernet franc, 8 percent petit verdot. 370 cases. Excellent. About $75.

22. L’audacieuse 2010, Coteaux de l’Ardeche (rose). 50 percent syrah, 30 percent grenache, 20 percent cinsault. In a year of superb rosé wines, this was the best. Excellent. About $30.

23. Lis Neris “Gris” Pinot Grigio 2008, Friuli Isonzo, Italy. Excellent. About $25-$35.

24. Ca’ Lojera di Tiraboschi Lugano del Lupo 2006, Lugano, Lombardy, Italy. A mind-blowing sweet wine made from — who woulda thunk it? — late-harvest trebbiano. Excellent. Price unknown. (A small quantity of the Ca’ Lojera di Tiraboschi wines are brought to these shores.)

25. Mayacamas Chardonnay 2008, Mount Veeder, Napa Valley. 876 cases. Exceptional. About $30.

26. Merry Edwards Sauvignon Blanc 2010, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $30.

27. Montenidoli Il Templare 2006, Toscana I.G.T., Italy. An extraordinary blend of what should be ordinary grapes: trebbiano, malvasia, vernaccia. Exceptional. About $23.

28. Chateau Montelena Cabernet Sauvignon 2007, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $49.

29. Morgan Winery Double L Chardonnay 2009, Santa Lucia Highlands, Monterey. 560 cases. Exceptional. About $36.

30. Mount Horrocks Cordon Cut Riesling 2008, Clare Valley, Australia. Exceptional. About $32 for a half-bottle.

31. Nickel & Nickel Medina Vineyard Chardonnay 2009, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. Exceptional. About $48.

32. Nickel & Nickel Stelling Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon 2006, Oakville District, Napa Valley. 547 cases. Exceptional. About $140.

33. Nickel & Nickel Vogt Cabernet Sauvignon 2007, Howell Mountain, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $90.

34. Tenuta dell’Ornellaia Le Volte 2009, Toscana I.G.T., Italy. 50 percent merlot, 30 percent sangiovese, 20 percent cabernet sauvignon. Excellent. About $30.

35. Paul Bara Grand Cru Brut Réserve, non-vintage. A grower Champagne from one of the best houses in Bouzy. Excellent. About $45-$50.

36. Paul-Marie et Fils Pineau des Charentes Tres Vieux Fut #3. Pineau des Charentes, a fortified wine made in Cognac, is considered old if it ages five years in barrels; this superb example aged 25 years. Exceptional. About $90.

37. Dr. Pauly-Bergweiler Bernkasteler alte Badstuke am Doctorberg Riesling Spätlese 2008, Mosel, Germany. Excellent. About $25-$30.

38. Pfeffingen Ungsteiner Herrenberg Riesling Beerenauslese 2004, Pfalz, Germany. Exceptional. About $50 for a half-bottle.

39. Roda Reserva 2006, Rioja, Spain. 81 percent tempranillo, 14 percent graciano, 5 percent garnacha. Excellent. About $45.

40. Bodegas Septima Gran Reserva 2008, Mendoza, Argentina. 50 percent malbec, 40 percent cabernet sauvignon, 10 percent tannat. Excellent. About $25.

41. Sequana Dutton Ranch Pinot Noir 2009, Green Valley of Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. 514 cases. Excellent. About $45.

42. Smith-Madrone Cabernet Sauvignon 2005, Spring Mountain District, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $45.

43. Smith-Madrone Chardonnay 2008, Spring Mountain District, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $30.

44. Susana Balbo Cabernet Sauvignon 2008, Mendoza, Argentina. Excellent. About $25.

45. Taittinger Comtes de Champagne Blanc de Blancs Brut 1998, Champagne, France. Exceptional. About $179, but prices soar beyond.

46. Tardieu Laurent “Guy Louis” 2008, Côtes-du-Rhône. Excellent. About $28.

47. Chateau Thivin Côte de Brouilly 2010, Beaujolais, France. Excellent. About $24.

48. Chateau Tire Pe Les Malbecs 2009, Bordeaux. Excellent. About $25-$28.

49. Trefethen Family Vineyards Cabernet Sauvignon 2008, Oak Knoll District, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $58.

50. Twomey Cellars Merlot 2006, Napa Valley. Exceptional. About $50.


Felt pretty sleepy today, feeling as if I neglected something important. What is today, anyway? Oh, wait, It’s Nov. 17, the third Thursday of November! Oh no! I missed the release of Beaujolais Nouveau! Darn, drat, rats, damn, merde! How could I have done that? I can’t believe that I missed the fun and festivities and frothy, grapy stuff! I must have been, oh, I dunno, out of my head or something. I’ll do better next year. Maybe. Sorta.

Next Page »