Tuscany


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Wines under the “Coltibuono” label from the Badia a Coltibuono winery are not made from estate grapes but from vineyards throughout Tuscany with which the Stucchi Prinetti family has long-term relationships. That estate, by the way, has been owned by the family since 1846, though the monastery on which it is founded goes back more than a thousand years. So, the Coltibuono “RS” Chianti Classico 2014 — the initials stand for Roberto Stucchi — is composed of 100 percent sangiovese grapes and aged briefly in a combination of French oak casks and barriques. The wine brings its sangiovese character right to the front, with a lovely light transparent ruby hue and enticing aromas of red cherries and raspberries, black tea, orange rind and cloves, with undertones of leather, loam and graphite. These qualities segue seamlessly onto the palate, where the wine is quite dry, even a bit austere from mid-point back, and freighted with a texture that’s lithe and sinewy and animated by bright acidity. A few moments in the glass bring in hints of talc, lilac and violets. 13.5 percent alcohol. We drank this wine with spaghetti and meatballs — not exactly a Tuscan dish — to which it made a fine accompaniment. Now through 2018. Very Good+. About $15, representing Real Value.

Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif. A sample for review.

Let’s face it, when you sit down to a pepperoni pizza or a plateful of spaghetti and meatballs, bastardoyou don’t want to drink a fine red wine that sings of the earth and the sky, of rain and sun, soil and bedrock, a wine that embodies a vineyard, place, a life, a wine that is both typical and individual. No, friends, when you sit down to a pepperoni pizza or a plateful of spaghetti and meatballs what you want is a well-made, decent quaff that sits well with the food and doesn’t get in the way. Such a one is today’s selection, Il Bastardo Sangiovese 2015, Rosso di Toscana. The wine is 100 percent varietal, made in stainless steel and serves as a sort of cadet version of Chianti. In fact the maker of Il Bastardo is Renzo Masi, a third-generation Chianti producer in the Rufina district east of Florence. The color is dark ruby-garnet shading to lighter ruby; aromas of dried fruit and flowers mixed with dusty graphite segue to sweet black currants and red cherries touched with hints of oolong tea and orange rind. The wine is quite dry, animated by clean acidity, and it finishes not with a bang but a whisper of cherry pit and exotic spices. 13 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2017 and just enjoy it. Very Good. About $9, a Great Value.

R. Shack Selection, imported by HB Wine Merchants, New York. A sample for review.

Here’s the wine you want with your red sauce pasta or pizza, roasted pork loin, braised short 2014ribs, even a burger. The Badia a Coltibuono Chianti Classico 2014 is a fairly traditional interpretation of the style, composed of 90 percent sangiovese grapes and 10 percent canaiolo, ciliegiolo and colorino, old-fashioned grapes nowadays somewhat neglected in Tuscany in favor of “international” varieties. The wine aged one year in French and Austrian oak barrels of various sizes, meaning that the emphasis was not on the lordly and ubiquitous small French barrique. (Producers, please, putting your wine in French barriques does not automatically make it a better wine! Or “better” wine.) The Badia a Coltibuono Chianti Classico 2014 offers a lovely medium ruby hue and pungent aromas and flavors of red and black cherries with some cherry pit astringency, cloves and orange rind, oolong tea and loam. It’s as dry and spare as Chianti Classico ought to be, its elegance supported by dusty, brushy tannins and vivid acidity that cuts a swath on the palate. Hints of violets and white pepper emerge after a few minutes in the glass. The whole package is lithe, well-integrated and tasty. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2019 or ’20. Excellent. About $20.

Imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif. A sample for review.

At first sniff and sip, you might think of the Aia Vecchia Vermentino 2015, Toscana Maremma, scheda_tecnica-vermentino2“Well, that’s a decent quaff, pleasant, tasty, as untroubled as still waters.” Give it a few minutes, though, and the wine increases its effects and powers. Made all in stainless steel tanks, the wine contains 5 percent viognier to the 95 percent vermentino. The hue is very pale gold, almost colorless; it opens with delicate notes of peach and pear, with hints of flint and acacia, dried thyme and almond blossom. Give this wine a chance, and it unfurls its savory and saline character, as lively and bracing as a sea-breeze and buoyed by bright acidity. Lithe and sinewy on the tongue yet dense with slightly roasted stone-fruit flavors just touched by a wisp of honeyed lushness, the wine devolves to a spice and limestone-packed finished rounded by nuances of grapefruit peel and almond skin bitterness. 13 percent alcohol. We drank this with a white bean, yellow pepper and sage soup, and it was great. It would also be terrific with grilled shrimp and just about any roasted or grilled fish and seafood risotto. Very Good+, and at a remarkable $12 a bottle, Buy It by the Case.

Imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif. A sample for review.

If you’re looking for a classic Chianti that’s not pumped up with toasty new oak and the vanilla and spice accents of French barriques, a Chianti that’s not lush and over-extracted, a Chianti chiantimade with traditional grapes and in traditional methods, well, this is your lucky day. The Selvapiana Chianti Rufina 2013 is a blend of 95 percent sangiovese grapes with five percent canaiolo, colorino and malvasia nera — no merlot! no cabernet sauvignon! — that ages in large oak casks of 25 and 30 hectoliters, that is, 660.4 and 792.5 gallons respectively. A barrique holds about 59 gallons, meaning that there’s more wood influence on the wine it contains. The color is a lovely transparent medium ruby-garnet hue; aromas of dried raspberries and cranberries are inflected with notes of orange zest, oolong tea, dried thyme and graphite, that after a few moments open to hints of rose petals and violets. The wine is quite dry, with a spare, honed texture that supports flavors of red raspberries and cherries offering a hint of cloves and almond skin against a light background of dusty tannins that do, however, dig deeply into the wine’s structure. 13 percent alcohol. The family-owned estate goes back five generations and almost 200 years. Chianti Rufina is the smallest wine-producing entity of Tuscany’s Chianti region, but probably the best-known of the sub-zones. It is also not contiguous with the rest of Chianti or Chianti Classico, lying to the east of Florence in an area singled out for mention by Cosimo III Grand Duke of Florence in his edict of 1716 as one of the zones of superior production. Shielded by the Apennines to the north but accessible to a maritime breeze, Rufina is cooler than the areas of “regular” Chianti to the west. Drink now through 2019 to ’21 with red meat or tomato-based pasta dishes and pizzas, roasted veal shoulder or pork tenderloin. Excellent. About $17, representing Good Value.

Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif. A sample for review.

We tend to know when a wine is great from the first sniff and taste, because it possesses that ineffable yet very real quality called charisma. Renewed sniffing and tasting confirm that assessment, while adding depth and character. These factors hold true whether a wine costs $19 or $350, the range represented in today’s 2015 edition of the annual “50 Great Wines” post. I wouldn’t pay $350 for a bottle of wine — though apparently some people would — but I appreciate the occasional opportunity to encounter one. Of the wines on today’s roster, 18 rate Exceptional and 32 rate Excellent. Often the dividing line between Excellent and Exceptional is fine indeed, with permutations and intimations running silent and deep in each direction, but since my inclination is toward distinctions, rankings and hierarchies — that’s what graduate school will do for you — I always include a rating for each wine reviewed on BTYH. On the other hand, I refuse to employ the famous 100-point system; I would rather leave room for some ambiguity and imagination.

A great wine satisfies every point of interest and essence that we desire from a wine, exuding a feeling of utter completion and comprehension. Each wine accomplishes this purpose in a different way, of course, and to varying degrees, necessitating different responses. Some of these wines I admire, gravely and humbly; others, I adore rather shamelessly. The ultimate test, I think, is that when we drink a bottle of great wine, our conclusion is thus: “I wouldn’t want it to be anything other than this,” a sentiment we might also share with works of art and love affairs.

Today’s roster is presented alphabetically. Where a wine is a blend of grapes, I include the percentages that compose the blend. I also mention the case production for wines released in limited quantities, of which many on this list, not surprisingly, are. I do not include alcohol levels or names of importers or technical, geographical or historical date That sort of information is available in the reviews. These wines were selected from examples that I wrote about during 2015. The preponderance were samples for review, for which I thank the wineries, importers and marketing people who sent them.

For whatever eccentricities this list of “50 Great Wines of 2015” embodies, blame them on my taste, knowledge, experience and intuition. That is all I — or any of us — have to go on.
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achaval-ferrer-CMendoza-2013
Achaval Ferrer Cabernet Sauvignon 2013, Mendoza, Argentina. Excellent. About $25.
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valadorna 09
Arcanum Valadorna 2009, Toscana IGT, Italy. 85 percent merlot, 8 percent cabernet franc, 7 percent cabernet sauvignon. Exceptional. About $80.

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14537_ARG-NHRS-13-F_1
Argyle Nuthouse Riesling 2013, Eola-Amity Hills, Oregon. Exceptional. About $30.
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sangioveto
Badia a Coltibuono Sangioveto di Toscana 2009, Toscana IGT, Italy. 100 percent sangiovese. 750 cases. Excellent. About $60.
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Benovia-2013-Russian-River-Valley-Pinot-Noir
Benovia Pinot Noir 2013, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $38.
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occultumlapidem2012us
Bila-Haut Occultum Lapidem 2013, Côtes du Roussillon Villages Latour de France. 50 percent syrah, 40 percent grenache, 10 percent carignan. Excellent. About $30.
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BlackKite
Black Kite Cellars Stony Terrace Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County. 200 cases. Excellent. About $60. (Not exactly the correct label, but this is what they look like.)
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terras gauda
Bodegas Terras Gauda O Rosal 2014, Rias Baixas, Spain. 70 percent albariño, 15 percent loureiro, 15 percent caiño blanco. Excellent. About $24.
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Riesling
Chateau Montelena Riesling 2014, Potter Valley. Excellent, About $25.
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clemens-busch-vom-grauen-schiefer-riesling-trocken-mosel-germany-10529188
Weingut Clemens Busch Grauen Schiefer Riesling Trocken 2012, Mosel, Germany. Excellent. About $30.
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Terrunyo_Sauvignon_Blanc_Front_Label-300x218
Concha y Toro Terrunyo Los Boldos Vineyard Block 5 Sauvignon Blanc 2012, Casablanca Valley, Chile. Excellent. About $26.
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cornerstone 11
Cornerstone Cellars The Cornerstone 2011, Napa Valley. 85 percent cabernet sauvignon, 10 percent merlot, 5 percent cabernet franc. 100 cases. About $150.
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duckhorn merlot
Duckhorn Vineyards Merlot 2012, Napa Valley. With 7 percent cabernet sauvignon, 2 percent cabernet franc, 1 percent malbec. Excellent. About $54.
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ehlers
Ehlers Estate Sylvanie Cabernet Franc Rosé 2014, St. Helena, Napa Valley. Exceptional. About $28.
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FEL-Logo_850x500
FEL Savoy Vineyard Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County. 645 cases. Excellent. About $65.
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Foursight Jpeg Logo
Foursight Wines Charles Vineyard Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County. 224 cases. Excellent. About $46.
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FINAL 2013 ESS LABELb
Grgich Hills Estate Miljenko’s Selection Essence Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Napa Valley. 1,204 cases. Exceptional. About $55.
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Grgich Hills Estate Miljenko’s Selection Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Napa Valley. 485 cases. Exceptional. About $90.
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inman-rose
Inman Family Endless Crush Rosé of Pinot Noir 2014, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. 1,500 cases. Excellent. About $25.
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iron-horse-brut-x
Iron Horse Brut “X” 2010, Green Valley of Russian River Valley. 69 percent pinot noir, 31 percent chardonnay. 500 cases. Excellent. About $50.
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jacquard
Champagne Jacquart Brut Rosé nv. 53 percent pinot noir, 35 percent chardonnay, 12 percent pinot meunier. Excellent. About $55.
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La Jota Vineyard Co. W.S. Keyes Vineyards Merlot 2010, Napa Valley. 296 cases. Exceptional. About $50.
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cuvee rose
Champagne Laurent-Perrier Cuvee Rosé Brut nv. 100 percent Grand Cru pinot noir. Excellent. About $99.
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laurent 2006
Champagne Laurent-Perrier Brut Millesime 2006. Excellent. About $65.
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lokoya
Lokoya Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Mount Veeder, Napa Valley. Exceptional. About $350.
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ember-site
Loomis “Ember” Red Wine 2012, Napa Valley. Syrah, grenache, mourvedre. 75 cases. Excellent. About $38.
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maggy
Maggy Hawk “Afleet” Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County. 156 cases. Exceptional. About $66.

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MFW_Rose_Face
MacPhail Family Wines Rosé of Pinot Noir 2014, Sonoma Coast. 492 cases. Exceptional. About $22.
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loidana-nueva-imagen-def_0_0
Marco Abella Loidana 2010, Priorat, Spain. 60 percent grenache, 25 percent carignane, 15 percent cabernet sauvignon. Excellent. About $30.
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mccay zin
McCay Cellars “Trulux” Zinfandel 2012, Lodi. 479 cases. Excellent. About $32.
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mcintyre
McIntyre Vineyards Estate Pinot Noir 2013, Santa Lucia Highlands, Monterey County. 368 cases. Exceptional. About $42.
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Morgan_2012_Double_L_Chardonnay
Morgan Winery Double L Vineyard Chardonnay 2012, Santa Lucia Highlands, Monterey County. 530 cases. Exceptional. About $42.
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beautiful pinot gris
Mt Beautiful Pinot Gris 2014, North Canterbury, New Zealand. 1,500 cases. Exceptional. About $19.
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Pahlmeyer and Jayson Wines Line Up
Pahlmeyer Merlot 2012, Napa Valley. Exceptional. About $85.
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pfendler
Pfendler Pinot Noir 2013, Sonoma Coast. 350 cases. Excellent. About $45.
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post and vine
Post & Vine Testa Vineyard Old Vine Field Blend 2012, Mendocino County. 42 percent zinfandel, 37 percent carignane, 21 percent petite sirah. 143 cases. Excellent. About $28.
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quivira zin
Quivira Zinfandel 2012, Dry Creek Valley, Sonoma County. With 10 percent petite sirah, 1 percent carignane. Excellent. About $26.
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innocent
St. Innocent Freedom Hill Vineyard Pinot Noir 2012, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 948 cases. Exceptional. About $42.
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sequoia grove cab
Sequoia Grove Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Napa Valley. With 11 percent cabernet franc, 10 percent merlot, 1 percent each petit verdot and malbec. Excellent. About $38.
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smith madrone 11
Smith-Madrone Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Spring Mountain District, Napa Valley. 1,070 cases. Excellent. About $45.
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tonella sb
S.R. Tonella Cellars Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Rutherford, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $29.
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2014EstateSauvBlanc
Stonestreet Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Alexander Valley, Sonoma County. Exceptional. About $35.

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tanner dafoe
Tanner Dafoe Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Santa Ynez Valley, Santa Barbara County. 141 cases. Exceptional. About $110.

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taylor
Taylor Fladgate Vargellas Vintage Porto 2012, Portugal. Exceptional. About $53.
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joon
Tin Barn “Joon” Coryelle Fields Vineyard Rosé of Syrah 2014, Sonoma Coast. 158 cases. Excellent. About $23.
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torre
Torre San Martino Vigna della Signore 2013, Colli di Faenza Bianco, Italy. Chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, albana grapes. Excellent. $NA.
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two shepherds logo
Two Shepherds Grenache Rosé 2014, Sonoma Coast. 90 cases. Exceptional. About $24.
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Vietti Castiglione Barolo 2011, Piedmont, Italy. 100 percent nebbiolo grapes. Excellent. About $50.
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Chateau Villa Bel-Air 2013, Graves, Bordeaux. 65 percent sauvignon blanc, 35 percent semillon. Excellent. About $25.
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2012-Jordan-PN-300x207
Youngberg Hill Jordan Block Pinot Noir 2012, Willamette Valley. 300 cases. Excellent. About $50.
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The Jackson family acquired the Arcanum estate, a 2,500-acre property in Tuscany, in 1994. Of that land, 223 acres are planted in arcanum_l1vines. The property is located at the southeast corner of the Chianti Classico region, near the city of Siena. (Jackson Family Wines also owns an estate in the Chianti Classico zone, Tenuta di Arceno.) No traditional Tuscan grapes are grown at Arcanum — I mean sangiovese; the focus is on cabernet franc and merlot, as if we were in St.-Emilion, that Right Bank appellation of Bordeaux famed for its wines based on those grapes. Cabernet sauvignon plays a minority position in these wines, and what’s also interesting is that all three age in French oak barrels only for a year. Winemaker is Pierre Seillan, yes, a Frenchman in Tuscany, who also makes the wine at Chateau Lassègue, Jackson Family Wines’ outpost in St.-Emilion, and at its Vérité estate in Sonoma County. The cultivated areas of Arcanum are divided into 63 small blocks of vineyard that range in elevation from 1,000 to 1,500 feet above sea level, each treated as a representative of its minute differences in micro-climate and soil. These are splendid wines, replete with authority, confidence and personality. I was especially taken with the merlot-dominate Valadorna 2009, though picking a favorite among these three is an exercise in folly. I use the phrase intense and concentrated in each of these reviews, a factor for which I will not apologize, because it summarizes the dense, substantial, coiled and slightly esoteric nature of the wines.
Sovereign Wine Imports, Santa Rosa, Calif. These wines were samples for review.
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Il fauno is the cadet of the trio of wines produced by this estate, which is not to imply that there’s anything inchoate or faunosecondary about it. The blend for Il fauno di Arcanum 2010, Toscana I.G.T., is 56 percent merlot, 23 percent cabernet franc, 20 percent cabernet sauvignon and a bare 1 percent petit verdot; the wine spent a year in French oak barriques. The color is dark ruby shading to medium ruby at the rim; the bouquet mounts a wonderful evocation of dried black and blue fruit, flowers and spices in a heady and exotic amalgam pointed with graphite, lavender, roasted fennel, rosemary and that herb’s redolent resiny note. It’s quite a dry wine, and you feel the effect of spicy oak, dusty tannins and vibrant acidity all the way to the inky bottom, though that character does not negate the presence of intense and concentrated black currant, blueberry and plum flavors. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink now — with a medium-rare ribeye steak, hot and crusty from the grill — through 2020 or ’22. Excellent. About $30.
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Valadorna 2009, Toscana I.G.T, is a blend of 85 percent merlot, 8 percent caberet franc and 7 percent cabernet sauvignon; it aged in valadorna 09French oak barrels, 40 percent new, for 12 months. If only all merlot-based wines displayed this sort of integrity and character. The deep ruby hue seems to reflect the wine’s ferrous and sanguinary nature, its fleshy iodine and iron qualities; again, I’ll deploy the words intense and concentrated, not in the sense of tightly wound or unyielding but in the way of saying that it feels as if there’s more there packed into the wine then should be there by rights. Black and red currants and raspberries are deeply dyed with cloves, allspice — with the latter’s slight astringent element — lavender and licorice and notes of sage, espresso and ancho chile. Formidable tannins feel dusty, granitic and fathomless, while acidity strikes a spark through the whole resonant package. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink now or wait a year or two through 2021 through 2025. Exceptional. About $80.
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Arcanum is the flagship wine of the estate, a true vin de garde denoting dignity, station and longevity. Arcanum 2009, arcanumToscana I.G.T., combines 68 percent cabernet franc, 22 percent merlot and 10 percent cabernet sauvignon in a wine that aged 12 months in French oak barriques, 70 percent new. The color is dark ruby, opaque at the center, shading to mulberry at the rim; the wine’s primary attributes revolve around structure in the form of stalwart, lithic yet not hard tannins; blazing but not raw acidity; and a sense of dusty, spicy burnished wood. In addition to the familiar qualities of iodine and iron, Arcanum 09 displays loamy, briery and brambly attributes that grow more rigorous as the moments pass — I mean when you’re 30 to 40 minutes into the wine — and its dry, intense and concentrated nature barely opens to encourage notes of mocha and cocoa powder, white pepper and bay leaf, licorice and lavender and a pass at black and blue fruit flavors; there’s a tinge of cabernet franc’s blueberry, black olive and leather character. 14.5 percent alcohol. Try from the end of 2016 or into 2017 through 2027 to 2030. Excellent. About $100.
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Do I have to defend the right or necessity to drink rosé wines all year around? Do I have to man the barricades, go to the wall, belly up to the bar to convince nay-sayers that a shimmering, scintillating, beautiful rosé wine — dry, vibrant, fruity, subtle: not sweet — is appropriate in every month and season? If I have to do that, then my case may be hopeless, as far as the die-hard opposition goes, but those who have followed this blog for a considerable period will require no further persuasion, gentle or not. A clean dry rosé may serve as a refreshing aperitif in December as well as June, and few wines go better with fried chicken, for example, or various terrines or the egg-based dishes that front the sideboard for big family breakfasts during the upcoming holidays. Thanksgiving dinner itself is a good test for rosé wines. No, friends, do not neglect the rosé genre, from which I offer 10 models today. The Weekend Wine Notes eschew detailed technical, historical and geographical data (which we all adore) for the sake of incisive reviews ripped, almost, from the very pages of my notebooks, though arranged in more shapely fashion. These eclectic wines were samples for review. Enjoy!
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billa haut
Bila-Haut Rosé 2014, Pays d’Oc (from M. Chapoutier). NA% alc. Grenache and cinsault. Pale copper-salmon hue; orange zest, strawberries and raspberries; a pleasing heft of limestone minerality with cutting acidity; juicy and thirst-quenching, but dry as sun-baked stones; a finish delicately etched with chalk and dried thyme. Very Good+. About $14.
An R. Shack Selection, HB Wine Merchants, New York.
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blair rose
Blair Vineyards Delfina’s Vineyard Rosé of Pinot Noir 2014, Arroyo Seco. 13.3% alc. 117 cases. Bright peach-copper color; ripe strawberries macerated with cloves, raspberries, hints of tomato skin and pomegranate; paradoxically and deftly fleshy and juicy while being quite crisp and dry and tightly tuned with limestone and flint. A superior rosé. Excellent. About $22.
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14_VinGris_Domestic_750
Bonny Doon Vin Gris de Cigare 2014, Central Coast. 13% alc. 35% grenache, 18% mourvedre, 16% grenache blanc, 12.5% roussanne, 8% carignane, 8% cinsault, 1.5% marsanne, 1% counoise. Very pale onion skin hue with a topaz glow; quite delicate, almost fragile; dried strawberries and raspberries with a touch of peach and hints of lavender and orange rind; gently dusty and minerally, like rain-water drying on a warm stone; a note of sage in the finish. Elegantly ravishing. Excellent. About $18.
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bridge lane
Bridge Lane Rosé 2014, New York State (from Lieb Cellars). 11.9% alc. Cabernet franc 63%, merlot 21%, pinot blanc 8%, riesling 5%, gewurztraminer 3%. Ethereal pale peach-copper color; delicate notes of peach, strawberry and raspberry with a touch of watermelon and spiced pear; a hint of minerality subtle as a river-stone polished with talc; incisive acidity for liveliness; develops more floral elements as the moments pass: lavender, rose petal, violets, all beautifully knit. Excellent. About $18.
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heintz rose
Charles Heintz Vineyards Rosé of Pinot Noir 2014, Sonoma Coast. 13.5% alc. 250 cases. Beautiful salmon scale-light copper hue; blood orange, tomato skin, strawberries and raspberries, hints of violets and lilac, a note of cloves and damp limestone; red fruit on the palate with an undertone of peach; quite dry and crisp, lithe on the palate, but with appealing red fruit character and an element of stone-fruit and chalk-flint minerality. A gorgeous rosé. Excellent. About $19.
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cornerstone corallina
Cornerstone Stepping Stone Corallina Rosé 2014, Napa Valley. 13.1% alc. 100% syrah. Very pretty pink coral color; strawberries and raspberries, hint of pomegranate and a fascinating note of spiced tea and apple peel compote; a few minutes in the glass bring in touches of tomato aspic and red currants; full-bodied for a rose, with a texture that would be almost lush save for the bristling acidity that keeps the whole package energized. Drink through 2016. Excellent. About $18.
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Crossbarn Rosé of Pinot Noir 2014, Sonoma Coast (from Paul Hobbs). 12.5% alc. Pale copper-salmon color; intriguing musky-spicy note, crossbarn roselike rose hips, camellias, pomegranate, cloves and sandalwood macerated together; strawberries and orange rind; hints of pink grapefruit and peach; lively and crisp, with a chalk and flint edge to the supple texture; gains a fleshy and florid character on the finish. Very Good+. About $18
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loomis air
Loomis Family “Air” Rosé Wine 2013, Napa Valley. 12% alc. 41% grenache 36% mourvedre 13% counoise 10% syrah. 125 cases. Light copper-salmon hue; dried strawberries and raspberries, notes of lavender and red cherry; hints of watermelon and cloves; incisive acidity and limestone minerality bolster juicy red fruit flavors and an elegant and supple texture that retains a crisp chiseled character; a fillip of grapefruit rind and lemongrass provide interest on the finish. Drink through 2016. Excellent. About $18.
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cipressato
Santa Cristina Cipresseto Rosato 2014, Toscano IGT. 11% alc. Sangiovese, cabernet sauvignon, merlot, syrah. (An Antinori brand since 1946.) Light pink-peach color; delicately floral and spicy, notes of raspberries and red currants and a hint of dried thyme and heather; clean acidity and limestone minerality offer gentle ballast for tasty but spare red fruit flavors. Very Good+. About $14.
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stinson rose
Stinson Vineyards Rosé 2014, Monticello, Va. 13% alc. 100% mouvèdre. 175 cases. Classic onion skin hue with a tinge of darker copper; pink grapefruit, rose petals, cloves; raspberries and strawberries delicately strung on a line of limestone minerality and bright acidity; from mid-palate back notes of cranberry, pomegranate and grapefruit rind leading to a tart finish; lovely balance and integrity. Excellent. About $19.
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For last weekend’s Pizza and Movie Night — the film was Force Majeure — the wine I selected was the Selvapiana Vigneto Bucerchiale 2010, Chianti Rufina Riserva, a 100 percent sangiovese wine fermented in stainless steel tanks with natural yeasts and aged in small French oak barriques. Rufina is the smallest wine-producing entity of the Chianti region, but probably the best-known of the sub-zones. It is also not contiguous with the rest of Chianti or Chianti Classico, lying to the east of Florence in an area singled out for mention by Cosimo III Grand Duke of Florence in his edict of 1716 as one of the zones of superior production. Shielded by the Apennines to the north but accessible to a maritime breeze, Rufina is cooler than the areas of “regular” Chianti to the west. Its relative isolation has kept the wines of Rufina more obscure than Chianti Classico but also less expensive. The ancient estate was originally a summer retreat for the bishops of Florence and then for the families of Florentine merchants. It was purchased in 1827 by Michele Giuntini Selvapiana and is now operated by the fifth generation of his descendants. The estate’s 250 hectares include 60 hectares dedicated to vineyards, 50 to olive groves and 110 in woodland.

Selvapiana Bucerchiale 2010, Chianti Rufina Riserva, aged 15 months in French oak, only 10 percent new barrels. The color is an intense dark ruby hue shading to medium at the rim; first out of the glass are aromas of loam and brambles, sandalwood and cloves, with touches of graphite and lavender; the bouquet gradually opens to notes of smoked oolong tea, dried red and black cherries and cranberries and an undertone of iodine and iron, all elements that segue seamlessly to the palate. The wine offers a suave surface over stellar acidity and a vibrant structure that hums like a struck tuning fork; at almost five years after harvest, this sangiovese wine feels young and vigorous, though there’s no mistaking the dry dusty tannins and the finish that embodies the power of lithic austerity. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink now, with hearty fare centered on roasted or grilled red meat, through 2022 to ’26. Excellent. About $35.

Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif. A sample for review.


Sangioveto was once a term for the grape commonly known as sangiovese, the red wine stalwart of Tuscany. The Badia a Coltibuono estate in Tuscany honors the heritage with a wine named for that ancient denomination, so today we look at the Badia a Coltibuono Sangioveto di Toscano 2009, Toscano I.G.T., a 100 percent varietal wine that exhales an autumnal breath combining all that’s attractive and seductive about the meadow, the woodland and the vineyard. Depending on the year, the wines age from 12 to 18 months in French barriques, 25 percent new; the grapes are hand-harvested and ferment on native yeasts. Badia a Coltibuono Sangioveto di Toscano 2009 offers a dark ruby hue shading to brick-red at the rim; notes of leather, cloves, loam and some rooty, smoked black tea permeate an element of macerated red and black cherries, currants and plums; a few moments in the glass bring in hints of lavender, violets and bitter chocolate. The effect on the palate is a bit woody and briery; it takes 30 or 40 minutes for the wine to find balance and integration, after which it succeeds in delivering lovely purity and intensity of the grape’s essentially ripe but minerally character, with touches of figs and balsam, orange zest, graphite and burning leaves, all upheld by racy acidity that doesn’t quit and chiseled but softening tannins. Rabbit, quail, pheasant? Veal roast, leg o’ lamb, pastrami sandwich? Bring ’em on, I say. 14 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018 to 2020. Production was 750 cases. Excellent. About $60.

Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif. A sample for review.

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