Tempranillo


A movement is afoot to create rosé wines that are more robust, darker, more flavorful and emphatic than the classical spare, delicate, elegant models that originate in the South of France or the Loire Valley. At the same time, there’s quite a push to produce more rosé wines across the board, as wineries and estates around the world became aware, over the past decade, that Americans now love rosé. And let’s face it, friends, the American palate rules the world of wine. Today’s post looks at 15 examples of rosé wines from various regions in California, Italy, France, Spain and Argentina. The ratings for these wines range from Excellent down to Good, an indication as to quality and perhaps some wrongheaded choices in terms of grape varieties. I think, for instance, that the malbec grape isn’t a rational choice for rosé, perhaps being inherently too rustic. The best rosés still derive from the prototype varieties of the Rhône Valley and Provence — grenache, cinsault, mourvèdre, syrah — and from pinot noir, as in Sancerre, and yet I’m constantly surprised what great rosés can be made from outliers like refosco and tempranillo. So, I say to the winemakers of the world, Experiment, go ahead and surprise us! But keep it simple. The best rosé wines offer direct appeal; a finely-woven and fine-boned fruit, acid and mineral structure; and pure refreshing deliciousness.
These wines were samples for review.
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Aia Vecchia Solidio Rosato 2015, Toscana, Italy. 13.5% alc. 90% sangiovese, 10% merlot. Medium copper-salmon shade; spicy and peppery (white pepper), strawberries and raspberries, both dried and macerated; notes of melon and sour cherry; fairly earthy and a bit too rooty; lacks charm and finesse. A first rosé for this estate, not exactly a success. Good only. About $14.
Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif.
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Alta Vista Malbec Rosé 2015, Lujan de Cuyo, Mendoza, Argentina. 12.5% alc. Bright medium copper-salmon hue; vivid aromas of strawberry, raspberry and tomato skin, with a fairly lush texture; a bit too florid and blowsy … and with a sweetish finish. Doesn’t work. Good only. About $13.
Kobrand Wine and Spirits, Purchase, N.Y.
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Pink_Pedals_Label
Chronic Cellars Pink Pedals 2015, Paso Robles. 12.4% alc. 89% grenache, 11% syrah. Delicate salmon-pink shade; yes, petal-like — heehee — as in roses and violets, with notes of peach and cherry, some melon comes to the fore; engages the palate with bright acidity and a hint of graphite-dusty tile minerality, but mainly this is fine-boned and honed. Very Good+. About $15.
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Cune-Rosado-NV
Cune Rosado 2015, Rioja, Spain. 13.5% alc. 100% tempranillo. Vivid scarlet with a pink-orange blush; pure strawberry and raspberry with a tinge of melon; bouquet is as fresh as raindrops on roses, but this is fairly robust for a rose and even exhibits a bit of tannin and a definite saline-limestone edge, like a seashell just plucked from the waves; a note of peach comes up in a dry, almost chewy package. Unusual, but Very Good+. About $13.
Europvin USA, Denver, Colo.
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guogal rose
E. Guigal Rosé 2015, Côtes du Rhône, France. 13.5% alc. 60% grenache, 30% cinsault, 10% syrah. Pale salmon-pink color; peaches, watermelon, raspberries; touches of raspberry sorbet, lilac and talc; crisp and clean but moderately lush; notes of strawberry leaf and sage; tasty and nicely balanced. Very Good+. About $15.
Vintus LLC, Pleasantville, N.Y.
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lazy creek rose
Lazy Creek Vineyards Rosé of Pinot Noir 2015, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County. 14.2% alc. Pale copper-salmon color; a subtle and delicate melange of strawberries, raspberries, orange rind, heather and meadow flowers; these fruit flavors feel lightly spiced and macerated, balanced by bright acidity and a pointed element of limestone and flint minerality; lovely balance and texture on the palate. Excellent. About $22.
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Luigi-Bosca-Rose
Luigi Bosca A Rosé Is a Rosé Is a Rosé 2015, Mendoza, Argentina. 12% alc. 60% pinot gris, 40% syrah. The rather defensive name of this wine probably derives from the fact that it consists of more white wine than red wine in a quite unusual blend. Very pale smoky topaz-onion skin hue; melon and strawberry, delicately etched with tangerine and lemon balm, a hint of jasmine and red currant; the pertness of pinot gris with syrah’s alluring slightly dense texture; the finish offers the tang of lime peel, pomegranate and pink grapefruit. Intriguing. Excellent. About $22.
Frederick Wildman & Sons, New York
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Masi Rosa dei Masi 2015, Rosato della Venezia, Italy. 12.5% alc. 100% refosco grapes. Beautiful coral-pink color; pure strawberry and melon, with touches of almond skin, faint peach and Rainier cherry; lovely balance between a delicate nature and deeper intensity; attractive rainy-dusty-lilac aura and a very dry finish. Just terrific. Excellent. About $15, marking Great Value.
Kobrand Wines and Spirits, Purchase, N.Y.
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truvee
McBride Sisters Truvée Rosé 2015, Central Coast. 12.5% alc. 92% grenache, 5% syrah, 2% tempranillo, 1% roussanne. The color is a very pale Mandarin orange hue; the wine is very delicate, absolutely lovely; whispers of cherries and red currants open to notes of lilac and lavender, with nuances of talc and limestone; the floral element grows into an aura that’s tenderly exotic, while the wine remains dry, crisp and vibrant. Excellent. About $15.
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monaci
Castello Monaci Kreos 2015, Salento, Italy. 13% alc. 100% negroamaro grapes. Bright salmon-pink color; peaches and melon, ripe strawberry and tomato skin; undercurrent of damp stones; vivid acidity; slightly saline, loamy finish. Very Good. About $16.
Frederick Wildman & Sons, New York.
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MURIEL ROSADO 2011
Bodegas Muriel Rosado 2015, Rioja, Spain. 13.55 alc. 50% tempanillo, 50% garnacha. Smoky topaz-copper hue; peach, strawberry, orange zest; dusty gravel; lithe, fluid, tasty, lovely body and surface; juicy core of pink fruit but quite dry and classic in its delicacy and lightness; impeccably balanced between a nicely lush texture and vivid acidity, leading to a spare, chiseled finish. Very Good+. About $12, so Worth Buying by the Case.
Quinessential, Napa, Calif.
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Pedroncelli Winery Dry Rosé of Zinfandel 2015, Dry Creek Valley, Sonoma County. 13.9% alc. Bright cerise-mulberry color; melon and raspberry, thyme and sage, orange rind, pomegranate and mint and a whiff of white pepper; fairly intense for a rose, very dry, mouth-filling, not quite robust; chiseled acidity and flint-like minerality yet generously proportioned. Excellent. About $12, a Fantastic Bargain, buy it by the case.
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Q rose 15
Quivira Rosé 2015, Dry Creek Valley, Sonoma County. 13.5% alc. 988 cases. 55% grenache, 20 mourvèdre, 10 syrah, 10 counoise, 5 petite sirah. This aged four months in neutral French oak barrels. Light salmon-copper hue; peaches with notes of strawberries and raspberries, damp stones and hints of dried thyme and sage; very dry and flinty with bright acidity and a jewel-tone of cherry-pomegranate at the core. Excellent. About $22.
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RC ROSADO FT
Real Compañia de Vinos Rosado 2015, Meseta Central, Spain. 13.5% alc. 100% garnacha grapes (grenache). Florid copper-salmon color; starts out pretty, with rose petals and violets, strawberries and raspberries, orange rind and dried mountain herbs; needs more vibrancy, more nerve and bone. Pleasant though. Very Good. About $10.
Quintessential, Napa, Calif. The label image is one year behind.
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skr_rose_btl_535px
The Seeker Rosé Wine 2015, Côte de Provence, France. 13% alc. Grenache and cinsault. Very pale onion skin hue; a very delicate amalgam of hints and nuances, with notes of strawberry and raspberry, melon and dried thyme in a crisp lithe package that concludes with a slightly chiseled flinty edge. Pretty classic and very pretty too. Very Good+. About $14.
Kobrand Wine and Spirits, Purchase, N.Y.
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Both the Cune Rosado 2015 and the Viña Real Rosado 2015, from Spain’s Rioja region, were made by CVNE — that is, Compañia Vinicola del Norte de España — also known as Cune, and each two rosespronounced “coo-nay.” (The company was founded in 1879 by brothers Eusebio and Raimundo Real de Asua and is operated today by their direct descendants.) What accounts for the difference in color between the two rosé wines, that is between the bright cherry-berry color of the Cune Rosado ’15 and the pale slightly pink onion skin hue of the Viña Real Rosado ’15? The first was made from 100 percent red tempranillo grapes; the second is a blend of 85 percent white viura grapes and 15 percent tempranillo. Now if you’re like me, you’ll be a bit skeptical about calling a wine rosé when it’s composed of 85 percent white grapes. I mean, that seems like cheating, though according to extremely complicated EU regulations and their arcane terminology, it is permissible to make a rosé wine by blending red and white grapes or wines.

What are these contrasting rosé wines like?

The Cune Rosado 2015, Rioja, whose color is a striking bright scarlet with a pink-orange blush, offers aromas of pure strawberry, raspberry and cherry with tinges of melon and violets. It’s wonderfully fresh, like raindrops on roses, but it’s also almost robust, offering real body and even touches of slightly dusty tannins and a saline-mineral edge. None of these structural matters detract from and indeed provide a hint of ballast for delicious red berry flavors and an aura of summery fruit macerated in Mediterranean herbs. 13.7 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2017. Very Good+. About $13, marking Excellent Value.

The Viña Real Rosado 2015, Rioja, is an altogether different construct. The color is very pale onion skin with a faint pink cast; the bouquet offers delicate tissues of peaches and Rainier cherries, lilac and thyme, with back-notes of rose petals and damp and dusty roof tiles. Ethereal on the palate, this rosé nonetheless delivers pulsing acidity and a subtle but scintillating chalky-flint element for tensile strength. Primarily, though, the impression is of something exquisite and gauzy, an adjunct to progressive heat and refreshing breezes. 13 percent alcohol. Drink now through the end of 2016. Very Good+. About $15.

Imported by Europvin USA. Samples for review.

In some ways, it’s more fun to compile the “25 Great Wine Bargains” than it is to fret over the “50 Great Wines.” This present list of wines priced at $20 and under offers more geographical and varietal diversity, as well as appealing to people — most of the wine-drinkers on the face of the earth — would would rather pay $15 for a bottle of excellent wine than $150 for a bottle of exceptional wine. What’s particularly pleasing about today’s roster is that of the 25 wines included, all but two rate Excellent. The truth is that wines don’t have to be high-priced to be thoughtfully and precisely made or to embody all the characteristics of a terrific drink. An excellent sauvignon blanc for $11? Who would pass that up? These 25 Great Wine Bargains are cause for celebration, so have at it. Remember, though, that not all wines are available in every market. For bottles that can’t be found in your local retail stores, a search on the Internet may be helpful. Enjoy!

All of these selections were samples for review or were tasted at wholesaler trade events.
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kerner
Abbazia di Novacella Kerner 2013, Valle Isarco, Alto Adige, Italy. Kerner is a white hybrid grape created as recently as 1969. It is found primarily in Germany but certainly performed well in this section of Alto Adige. Excellent. About $19.
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baur
Francois Baur Brut Réserve nv, Crémant d’Alsace, France. Pinot blanc, riesling, chardonnay, pinot gris. Excellent. About $18.
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cattin riesling
Joseph Cattin Riesling 2013, Alsace, France. Excellent. About $14.
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Eric Chevalier Clos de la Butte 2013, Muscadet Côtes de Grand Lieu sur Lie 2013, Loire Valley, France. Excellent. About $16.
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Michele Chiarlo Le Madri Roero Arneis 2014, Piedmont, Italy. 100 percent arneis grapes. Excellent. About $18.
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Dry Creek Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Dry Creek Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $18.
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Eguia_Rosado_FT
Viña Eguía Rosado 2014, Rioja, Spain. 80 percent tempranillo, 20 percent garnacha. Very Good+. About $12.
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cava
Isaac Fernandez Seleccíon Biutiful Cava Rosé nv, Penedes, Spain. Excellent. About $15.
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schloss-gobelsburg-gobelsburger-riesling-kamptal-austria-10224971
Schloss Gobelsburg “Gobelsburger” Riesling 2013, Kamptal, Austria. Excellent. About $18.
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Hidalgo_Fino
Emilio Hildago Fino Jerez Seco nv, Jerez, Spain. Excellent. About $14 (500 milliliter bottle).
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leitz
Leitz Rudesheimer Berg Schlossberg Riesling Trocken 2013, Rheingau, Germany. Excellent. About $20.
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martini-cab
Louis M. Martini Cabernet Sauvignon 2013, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $20.
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masi
Masi Campofiorin 2011, Rosso del Veronese IGT, Italy. Corvino, rondinella and molinara grapes. Excellent. About $18.
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Mud House Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Marlborough, New Zealand. Excellent. About $17.
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pazo
Pazo San Mauro Albariño 2014, Rías Baixas, Spain. Excellent. About $19.
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ped sb
Pedroncelli East Side Vineyards Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Dry Creek Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $15.
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2012_domaine_perraud_macon_villages_vieilles_vignes
Domaine Perraud Vielles Vignes Mâcon-Villages 2013, Mâconnais, France. 100 percent chardonnay. Excellent. About $20.
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Amauta-Absoluto-Torrontes
El Porvenir de Cafayate Amauta Absoluto Torrontés 2012, Salta, Argentina. Excellent. About $16.
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prodigo
Prodigo Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Friuli Grave, Italy. Excellent. About $11.
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scaia-garganega
Tenuta Sant’Antonio Scaia Bianca 2014, delle Venezia IGT, Italy. The label asserts 55 percent garganega, 45 percent chardonnay grapes. Press materials and website say 50 percent garganega, 30 percent chardonnay, 20 percent trebbiano Soave. Whatever. Excellent. About $11.
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segries
Château de Ségriès Côtes-du-Rhône 2013, Rhone Valley, France. 50 percent grenache, 30 percent syrah, 10 percent each cinsault and carignane. Excellent. About $15.
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Charles Thomas Côtes-du-Rhône 2013, Rhone Valley, France. (Maison Jean-Baptiste Bejot) 50 percent syrah, 40 percent grenache, 10 percent mourvedre. Very Good+. About $12.
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valentina
La Valentina 2014, Cerasuolo d’Abruzzo, Italy. Rosé of montepulciano d’Abruzzo. Very Good+. About $12.
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VR_Label_14_WHITE4_Front
Vina Robles “White 4” 2014, Paso Robles, Santa Barbara County. 54 percent viognier, 22 percent vermentino, 15 verdelho, 9 sauvignon blanc. Excellent. About $16.
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Zemmer-Pinot_Bianco_Square
Peter Zemmer Punggl Pinot Blanc 2013, Alto Adige, Italy. Excellent. About $18.
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Here we go, nine red wines entirely fit for drinking with such fare as pizza, hamburgers, lasagna, spaghetti and meat balls, hearty sandwiches and so forth. These reviews are brisk, brief, incisive — forgoing technical, historical and geographical detail for the sake of immediacy. All these wines were samples for review or were tasted at a wholesaler’s trade event. Enjoy! ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Illuminate-2012RedBlend_NorthCoast-frontIlluminate Red Blend 2012, North Coast. 13.9% alc. 95% merlot, dollops of cabernet franc, malbec and petit verdot. (A second label of Kimmel Vineyards) Red and black berries with a touch of roasted plum; smoke, cedar and tobacco, hint of black olive; pleasing heft, lively and appealing; slightly slappy and sappy tannins, soft and dusty. For enjoyable, quaffable drinking. Very Good. About — ready for this? — $10, so Buy by the Case.
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neprica
Tormaresca Neprica 2011, Pulgia. 13.5% alc. 40% negroamaro, 30% primitivo, 30% cabernet sauvignon. (Tormaresca is Antinori’s outpost in Puglia.) Very deep ruby-purple; very dark and spicy red and black berry notes, permeated by dust and graphite, tar and oolong tea with hints of licorice, lavender and leather; robust and rustic in the best way, bristly, briery and juicy; lively acidity and chewy tannins in a dense but polished package. Tremendous personality for the price. Very Good+. About $11 (and often discounted around the country), marking Terrific Value.
Imported by Ste. Michelle Wine Estates, Woodinville, Washington
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gnarly head
Gnarly Head “1924” Double Black 2013, California. 15% alc. Zinfandel, merlot, syrah. A “limited edition” wine though number of cases is unspecified. (A label of Delicato Family Vineyards) Inky purple-black with a magenta rim; nothing subtle here but a strapping, muscular and juicy number, with ripe, spiced and macerated blackberry, blueberry and loganberry scents and flavors; briery and brambly, graphite and violets, bitter chocolate; pert and lively acidity, a core of mocha, lavender and velvety tannins; both concentrated and generous. Very Good+. About $12, Real Value.
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castelmaure_col_des_vents_2014_hq_label
Castelmaure Col des Vents 2014, Corbières, France. 13.5% alc. 50% carignan, 35% grenache, 15% syrah. Always a favorite. Medium ruby color; thyme and sage, spiced and macerated blackberries and currants and a hint of blueberries; juicy, tasty, lively; a note of graphite minerality over moderately dusty, slightly rustic tannins. Very Good+. About $12, a Great Bargain.
Imported by Kysela Pere et Fils, Winchester, Va.
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charles_thomas_cotes_du_rhone_rouge_hq_label
Charles Thomas Côtes-du-Rhône Rouge 2013, Côtes-du-Rhône, France. 13.5% alc. (From Maison Jean-Baptiste Bejot) 50% syrah, 40% grenache, 10% mourvedre. Vibrant dark ruby hue; lovely evocation of the southern Rhone: lavender, cloves, leather, sage; blackberries, currants and plums; a few minutes bring in hints of lavender and licorice; well-developed, ripe and spicy black fruit flavors bolstered by graphite, bright acidity and slightly chewy, medium-impact tannins. Very Good+. About $12, Amazing for the Price.
Imported by Kysela Pere et Fils, Winchester, Va.
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valentina
La Valentina 2012, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, Italy. 13% alc. 100% Montepulciano d’Abruzzo. Dark ruby-purple hue with a violet rim; red currants and raspberries with a nod toward black currants and blueberries; cloves, lavender and black pepper, sage and briers; brisk acidity and bright red and blue fruit flavors buoyed by moderately plush, dusty tannins; a robust finish, packed with spice, dried flowers and graphite. Very Good+. About $14, Excellent Value.
Imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif.
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segries
Chateau de Ségriès Côtes-du-Rhône 2013, Côtes-du-Rhône, France. 14% alc. 50% grenache, 30% syrah, 10% each cinsault and carignan. Talk about an over-achiever! Dark ruby hue, tinge of violet at the rim; mint, smoke, leather and a touch of iodine; blackberries, black and red currants and plums; violets and lavender; lithe and supple texture, flows deliciously across the palate, but tannins feel burnished and slightly roughened, as though polished with fine sandpaper; a finish packed with spice and granitic minerality. Drink now through 2018 or 2020. Excellent. About $15, an Unbeatable Bargain.
Imported by Kysela Pere et Fils, Winchester, Va.
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hito
Cepa 21 Hito 2014, Ribera del Duero, Spain. 14.5% alc. 100% tempranillo. Dark ruby with a violet-magenta rim; an inky, savory and saline tempranillo, with notes of lavender and graphite, leather and lilac, black cherries, currants and plums, all smoldering in the glass; a few minutes unfold hints of iodine and mint; cozy and cushiony tannins have a lithic-briery bite; clean acidity runs through it, lending energy and verve; the ripe, dusty black fruit flavors persist through a dense, slightly austere finish. Lots of presence for the price. Now through 2019 to 2021. Excellent. About $16.
Imported by Moro Brothers Inc., New York
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hess treo
Hess Select Winemaker’s Blend 2012, California. 13.8% alc. 38% petite sirah, 29% syrah, 22% zinfandel, 11% merlot. Dark ruby hue, faintly purple; and then if “purple” had a smell and taste: inky but not brooding, spiced and macerated black and red currents, red raspberries and a hint of mulberry, all infused with cloves, graphite and lavender; robust but more sleek than rustic, vibrant acidity to keep your taste-buds wanting more; non-threatening tannins frame it nicely along granitic lines. Now through 2016 into 2017. Very Good+. About $17.
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Here’s a nifty red wine to quaff while chowing down on pizza, burgers, spaghetti and meatballs, nachos and other fare that’s terrifically satisfying and not so good for you — but the red wine cancels out the bad parts! Finca Resalso 2014, from Spain’s Ribera del Duero region, composed of 100 percent tempranillo grapes, is the youngest wine to issue from Bodegas Emilio Moro, made from vines five to 15 years old. It ages four months — a few heartbeats in the life of a more substantial wine — in French and American oak. Fresh, clean and ripe, the Finca Resalso 2014 offers a dark ruby-violet hue and gripping aromas of black and red currants and plums, with undertones of blueberry, cloves and lavender over a base of graphite. The wine is moderately full-bodied, tasty with its red and black fruit flavors and nicely firm in its slightly dusty branchy tannins, all elements tied together by bright acidity; a few minutes in the glass bring in notes of black tea and orange zest, all ensconced in a finish that feels lively and a bit feral. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink through 2016 or ’17 and don’t worry your pretty little heads about it. Very Good+. About $15, representing Real Value.

Imported by Moro Brothers Inc., New York. A sample for review.

Let’s begin August with a bargain-priced rosé wine from Spain’s Rioja region. You would guess that a red or pink wine from that area renowned for its tempranillo grapes would be made from tempranillo, which is it primarily but with 20 percent garnacha grapes in the blend. The Viña Aguía Rosado 2014 offers a vivid medium copper-salmon hue and enticing aromas of fresh strawberries and raspberries macerated with cloves, thyme and orange peel. This is a quite dry, robust and savory rosé — nothing delicate or fragile here — with a pronounced element of limestone minerality under its juicy spicy red fruit flavors, chiming acidity for crispness and animation and a quality that edges close to tannic. Still, the wine is definitely made for immediate drinking for its freshness and sense of elevation, especially through the finish, which brings in subtle notes of pomegranate and candied orange zest. The alcohol content is 13.5 percent. We happily drank this bottle with a pasta and a summery cold sauce of ripe tomatoes with capers, green olives, mozzarella and lots of basil. Very Good+. About $12, marking Great Value.

Imported by Quintessential Wines, Napa, Calif. A sample for review.

Well, thank goodness all that Thanksgiving hubbub is over and the attendant brouhaha about what wine to drink with the turkey and dressing and sweet potatoes and so on, so now we can focus just on wines to drink because we like them. Here are brief reviews of 12 such wines that should appeal to many tastes and pocketbooks. Prices range from $15 to $56; there are three white wines and nine reds, including a couple of sangiovese blends and a pair of white Rhône renditions from California, as well as a variety of other types of wines and grape varieties. As usual with these Weekend Wine Notes, I eschew technical, historical and geographical data for the sake of offering incisive notices designed to pique your interest and whet the palate, after which you may choose to wet your palate. These wines were samples for review. Enjoy! (In moderation, of course.)
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Capezzana Barco Reale di Carmignano 2011, Tuscany, Italy.13.5% alc. 70% sangiovese, 20% cabernet sauvignon, 10% canaiolo. Dark ruby-purple hue; raspberry, mulberry and blueberry, notes of potpourri, dried herbs and orange peel; a bit of stiff tannin from the cabernet, but handily a tasty and drinkable quaff with requisite acidity for vigor. Now through 2015. Very Good+. About $15, representing Good Value.
MW Imports, White Plains, N.Y.
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Bordòn Reserva 2008, Rioja, Spain. 13.5% alc. 80% tempranillo, 15% garnacha, 5% mazuela. Medium ruby color; mint, pine and iodine, macerated and slightly stewed red and black currants and cherries; violets, lavender, pot pourri, cloves and sandalwood; very dry, autumnal with hints of mushrooms and moss, nicely rounded currant and plum flavors, vivid acidity; a lovely expression of the grape. Now through 2016 to ’18 with roasted game birds. Very Good +. About $15, a Real Bargain.
Imported by Vision Wine & Spirits, Secaucus, N.J.
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Jacopo Biondi Santi Braccale 2010, Toscano. 13.5% alc. 80% sangiovese, 20% merlot. Medium ruby color; raspberries and red currants, orange zest and black tea, hints of briers and brambles, touches of graphite, violets, blueberries and cloves, intriguing complexity for the price; plenty of dry tannins and brisk acidity for structure, fairly spare on the plate, but pleasing texture and liveliness; flavors of dried red and black fruit; earthy finish. Now through 2016 or ’17 with grilled or braised meat, hearty pasta dishes. Very Good+. About $19, marking Good Value.
Imported by Vision Wine & Spirits, Secaucus, N.J.
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Clayhouse Estate Grenache Blanc Viognier 2013, Paso Robles. 14.5% alc. 70% grenache blanc, 30% viognier. Production was 650 bottles, so Worth a Search. Pale gold color; crystalline freshness, clarity and liveliness; jasmine and acacia, yellow plums, quince and ginger; beautifully balanced and integrated, exquisite elegance and spareness; saline and savory, though, with bracing acidity running through a pleasing talc-like texture; backnotes of almond blossom and dried thyme; a supple, lithe limestone-packed finish. Now through the end of 2015. Excellent. About $23.
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Les Trois Couronnes 2011, Gigondas, Rhône Valley, France. 14.5% alc. 70% grenache, 20% syrah, 10% mourvèdre. Dark ruby-violet color; lovely, enchanting bouquet of black olives, thyme, graphite, moss and mushrooms, opening to plums and black currants, pepper, leather and lavender; a bit of wet-dog funkiness aligns with dusty, supple tannins and beautifully integrated oak and acidity; rich, spicy black fruit flavors with a hint of blueberry; undertones of loam, underbrush, black licorice; spice-and-mineral-packed finish. Drink now through 2017 to ’19. Great with beef braised in red wine. Excellent. About $23.
Imported by OWS Cellars Selections, North Miami, Fla.
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Paul Dolan Zinfandel 2012, Mendocino County. 14.5% alc. Certified organic. Transparent ruby with a magenta rim; notes of strawberry, raspberry and blueberry with a nice raspy touch and hints of briers and brambles, black pepper, bitter chocolate and walnut shell; ripe and spicy raspberry and cherry flavors, a bit meaty and fleshy, but increasingly bound with dusty tannins and graphite minerality, all enlivened by generous acidity. Not a blockbuster but plenty of stuffing. Now through 2016. Excellent. About $25.
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Bonny Doon Le Cigare Blanc 2013, Arroyo Seco, Monterey County. 55% roussanne, 26% grenache blanc, 19% picpoul. 1,965 cases. Very pale gold hue; green apple, peach and spiced pear; lemon balm, ginger and quince; wonderful tension and resolution of texture and structure; taut acidity, dense and almost voluptuous yet spare, tensile and vibrant with crystalline limestone minerality; seamless melding of lightly spiced and macerated citrus and stone-fruit flavors; feels alive on the palate, engaging and compelling. Now through 2016 or ’17. Exceptional. About $28.
The winery website has not caught up with the current vintage.
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Cornerstone Cellars Stepping Stone Pinot Noir 2012, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 14.1% alc. 100% pinot noir grapes. Dark to medium ruby-mulberry color; black cherry and raspberry scents and flavors with plenty of tannic “rasp” and underlying notes of briers, brambles and loam; cloves, a hint of rhubarb, a touch of cherry cola; all enlivened by pert acidity. A minor key with major dimension. Now through 2016. Excellent. About $30.
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von Hövel “R” Spatlese Dry Riesling 2012, Mosel, Germany. 11% alc. 100% riesling. Very pale gold color; peach, pear and lychee; hints of honeysuckle, grapefruit and lime zest; a chiseled and faceted wine, benefiting from incisive acidity and scintillating limestone and flint elements; tremendous, indeed inescapable resonance and presence, yet elegant, delicate and almost ethereal; long penetrating spice and mineral-inflected finish. Now through 2018 to ’20. Excellent. About $34.
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Sequoia Grove Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Napa Valley. 14.2% alc. 81% cabernet sauvignon, 9% cabernet franc, 8% merlot, 1% each petit verdot and malbec. Deep ruby with a magenta tinge; cedar and thyme, hint of black olive; quite spicy and macerated black currants and plums with a hint of black and red cherry; lithe, supple, muscular and sleek; dense but soft and finely sifted tannins adorned with slightly toasty oak, a scintillating graphite element and vibrant acidity; long spicy, granitic finish. Now through 2016 to ’18. Excellent. About $38.
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Bonny Doon Cuvee R Grenache 2012, Monterey County. 14.9% alc. 100% grenache grapes. 593 cases. (Available to the winery’s DEWN Club members.) Dark reddish-cherry hue; dusty, spicy red and black cherries, with a curranty note and hint of raspberry; some cherry stem and pit pertness and raspiness; cloves and sandalwood, with a tide of plum skin and loam; the finely-knit and sanded tannins build as the minutes pass; clean, vibrant acidity lends energy and litheness. Terrific grenache. Drink now through 2016. Excellent. About $48.
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Plumpjack Merlot 2012, Napa Valley. 15.2% alc. (!) 91% merlot, 8% malbec, 1% cabernet sauvignon. Vivid dark ruby color; intense and concentrated aromas of cassis, black raspberry and plum; notes of cloves and sandalwood with a tinge of pomegranate and red cherry; a hint of toasty oak; sinewy and supple, almost muscular; deep black fruit flavors imbued with lavender and bitter chocolate and honed by finely-milled tannins, graphite minerality and keen acidity; a substantial merlot, not quite monumental because of its innate balance and elegance; through some miracle, you don’t feel the heat or sweetness of high alcohol. Now through 2020 to ’22, Excellent. About $56.
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I can’t say a great deal about most of these wines, because they were tasted on the fly or at a buffet lunch or dinner during my sojourn in the High Plains AVA (indicated in the map) back in the month of May. And My Readers throughout the country will recognize that the enterprise is inherently unfair in relationship to their curiosity because very few wines produced in the Lone Star State are available beyond its irregular borders. Naturally, this circumstance disturbs winemakers in Texas, because they know that many of the wines that issue from their doors are fine enough to stand up to any in the U.S.A. (No state, of course, has a monopoly on mediocre wines.) Texas has slightly more than 200 wineries; 95 percent of the wine is consumed inside the state. Obviously in a three-day visit, the main purpose being to tour vineyards and interview owners and growers, I could experience only the tiniest fraction of vinous products and those primarily relating to High Plains grapes. Still, I thought that it would be friendly and decent to give a shout-out to the wines that stood above the pack. I’ll say that some of the pricing structure seems inflated, if not downright grandiose. If you’re passing through Texas, however, you might want to investigate some of these wines at retail stores or perhaps visit the wineries. Most will be happy to ship for you if the state you live in allows the practice.
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McPherson Les Copains Rosé 2013, Texas, about $11. A delicate blend of 55 percent cinsault, 30 percent mourvèdre and 15 percent viognier. Kim McPherson is the son of “Doc” McPherson, one of the founders of seminal High Plains winery Llano Estacado, in Lubbock. McPherson Cellars is also in Lubbock and occupies an old Coca-Cola bottling plant from the 1930s. This is one of the best rosés I’ve had all year.
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It’s a consensus ( or fervent hope) in the High Plains of Texas AVA that tempranillo is the grape that will turn the tide and bring national attention to the region, though there’s a back-bench movement for montepulciano. This belief indicates a general segue in High Plains away from “classic” grapes like chardonnay, merlot and cabernet sauvignon to grapes that reflect the hot dry climate and its similarity to some areas of Spain, Italy and southern France. I probably tried more wines made from tempranillo grapes (or blends) while I was in High Plains than all the other wines combined; these four were certainly the best:

1. Becker Reserve Tempranillo 2012, about $19
2. Lewis Wines Newsom Vineyard Tempranillo 2011, High Plains. About $32(?). Neal Newsom is a prominent grower in High Plains.
3. Lost Oak Tempranillo 2012, about $33. (The winery is in Burleson, south of Fort Worth.)
4. Inwood Estates Vineyards Cornelious Reserve 2012, 100 percent tempranillo from the Inwood Block at Newsom Vineyards. About $69. (See next entry for more about Inwood.)
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Dan Gatlin is a wine pioneer in Texas, an outspoken and controversial figure. There’s no denying, though, that he is a brilliant winemaker or that his Inwood Estates wines, authentic and highly individual, are difficult to forget once you taste them. Gatlin’s chardonnays undergo no barrel-fermentation or malolactic and have what he called “a brief exposure to oak.” Both the 2012 and ’13 are notable chardonnays, the ’12 deftly balanced between elegance and weight, with prominent stony minerality and hints of pineapple, cloves and baked peaches; the ’13 suave, supple yet a little earthy, almost briery, showing chalky-flint elements. These are from Dallas County; they run about $40. Despite the movement toward Mediterranean basin grapes, cabernet sauvignon is still grown in High Plains; Gatlin’s Inwood Estates Mericana Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Newsom Vineyards, about $70, was definitively the best that I tasted.
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As testament to the affinity of Texas High Plains climate to the grapes of southern France and Spain, I tasted these three wines on every occasion they were offered and kept going back for more. The “Reddy” refers to Vijay Reddy, a prominent grower in High Plains.

1. Bending Branch Reddy Vineyard Mourvèdre 2011, Texas Hill Country, 145 cases, about $28.
2. Brushy Creek Reddy Vineyards Tannat 2008, Texas, about $20.
3. Brushy Creek Rachel’s Reserve Carignane 2010, Martin’s Vineyards, Texas. About $25.
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Though the grape and wine industry in the High Plains of Texas goes back only 40 years, it has already spawned a pedigree, at least in this sense. Kim McPherson, owner of his eponymous winery in Lubbock, is the son of the legendary “Doc” McPherson, founder, in 1976, along with Bob Reed, of LLano Estacado, the region’s first winery. In fact, these two remain the only wineries in the High Plains, a dry, flat, wind-swept terrain into which hedge-fund millionaires and ex-CEOs do not come parachuting and buying up land to make expensive cult wines. There are 35 grape-growers here, according to the website of the High Plains Grape Growers Association, and they tend to live in modest farm-houses with their families and raise such row-crops as cotton, sorghum and peanuts in addition to grapes.

McPherson Cellars occupies a building in Lubbock that was erected in the 1930s as the local Coca-Cola bottling facility. Though extensively remodeled, its wide-open spaces and high ceilings made it ideal for refurbishing into a winery. I visited McPherson Cellars three weeks ago and tasted through a range of the winery’s products, a line-up that illustrates the shift in High Plains from “classic” grapes such as chardonnay, merlot and cabernet sauvignon — the climate really isn’t suited — to more amenable varieties likes viognier, marsanne and roussanne for white and grenache, carignan, mourvèdre and tempranillo for red. In other words, grapes we associate with Spain, Italy and the south of France, the Mediterranean basin. Tempranillo, particularly, is looked on as the grape that will put High Plains on the vinous map.

The pricing for McPherson wines reflects its owner and winemaker’s comment that he is “the workingman’s friend,” to which he added, “I love screw-caps.” Neither expression should persuade tasters that his wines are down-market in quality, because they’re not; they are, mainly, delightful and charming, and they edge, in some cases, into serious structure.
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McPherson offered 504 cases of a sparkling wine — sold out at the winery — from 87 percent riesling and 13 percent vermentino grapes grown in High Plains, though the product was made by his brother Jon McPherson in Temecula via the Charmat process. Though pleasant enough, it felt a bit heavy and needed more cut and minerality. Good+. Price N/A.
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The next wine, however, I found exemplary. This was the McPherson Les Copains Rosé 2013, with a Texas rather than a High Plains designation, a blend of 55 percent cinsault, 30 percent mourvèdre and 15 percent viognier. A fount of delicacy and elegance, this rose was pungent with notes of strawberries and raspberries, lilac and lavender, and it displayed deft acidity and limestone minerality. 12.9 percent alcohol. Production was 480 cases. Excellent. About $11.
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The Tres Colore 2013 is a blend of carignan and mourvèdre with a touch of viognier. This is a lovely quaff, medium ruby color with a blush of magenta, fresh, briery and brambly, intensely raspberry-ish with some of the “rasp,” a hint of rose petal and good balance and acidity. 13.9 percent alcohol. 934 cases. Very Good. About $12 to $14.
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The white Les Copains 2012 is a blend of 45 percent viognier, 35 roussanne, 16 grenache blanc and 4 marsanne; I mean, we might as well be in the southern Rhone Valley. The color is medium gold, and the seductive aromas weave notes of jasmine and honeysuckle, peach, pear and papaya; very spicy stone fruit flavors are rent by pert acidity and limestone elements, while a few minutes in the glass bring in hints of dusty lilac and Evening in Paris cologne. Very charming. 13.9 percent alcohol. 616 cases. Very Good+. About $13.
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La Herencia Red Table Wine 2012 is a blend of 75 percent tempranillo, 9 percent syrah, 6 mourvèdre and 5 percent each grenache and carignan. This wine is characterized by pinpoint balance among a smooth and supple texture, graphite minerality, juicy red and black fruit flavors and bright acidity. A highly perfumed bouquet exudes hints of macerated red and black currants, orange rind and pomegranate. Another charming and drinkable wine, though with a steady spine of structure. It aged 14 months in new and neutral French oak barrels. 13.9 percent alcohol. 986 cases. Very Good+. About $14.
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McPherson also turns out 100 cases of Chansa Solera Reserve Single Cream Sherry that ages two years in American oak barrels. It’s made from chenin blanc and French colombard grapes. With its dark amber color, its notes of toffee and toasted coconut, cloves and allspice, bitter chocolate and roasted almonds, its sweet entry but bracing, saline finish, this is a pleasant way to end a meal. 16.5 percent alcohol. Very Good+. About $28.
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The young man pictured here is John Lewis Sims, and by “young” I mean that he just turned 21, making him old enough to drink alcoholic beverages in Texas. That stricture has not kept him from making wine, however, which he has been doing since he was 14. When I was in the High Plains of Texas last week, Sims showed up at a party where my writer colleagues and I were about to fall upon some magnificently tender and juicy beef brisket and simultaneously taste a raft of the state’s wines, many fashioned from grapes grown in the High Plains AVA. Sims cradled a bottle of his own wine with the attention a recent mother gives to her newborn, but there was nothing shy about his fervor.

“Making wine is all I ever wanted to do,” he said. “I love this place, and I want to grow grapes and make wine that reflects the nature of the vineyard. The main thing is allowing the original grapes to express themselves. I mean, isn’t that what it’s all about?”

It might be difficult for outsiders to understand the almost fanatical devotion that High Plains inhabitants evince for a geographical phenomenon that is relentlessly vast and oppressively flat, where the summers are hot and the winters cold, and where the wind blows ceaselessly and is often laden with sand and dust sucked up from abandoned fields. “The people are tenacious,” said Sims, “and the wines are tenacious.”

Sims works for the Binghams — always referred to as “the Binghams,” as one might say “the Mondavis” — and for his uncle Dusty Timmons, a well-known grower. The bottle that Sims brought to the party was made from two rows of tempranillo grapes that he tended in Timmons’ vineyard in Terry County. The tempranillo grape is increasingly important in the High Plains, as growers turn away from the chardonnay, cabernet sauvignon and merlot planted 30 and 40 years ago toward southern European and Mediterranean grapes more suited to the rigors of the High Plains climate.

Was the young man’s tempranillo a great wine? Well, no, but it was attractive and drinkable and subtly complex. The color was deep purple shading to magenta; it was ripe and plummy, a little dusty and briery, with a plethora of graphite and granitic elements, hints of lilacs and violets and sappy, rooty red and black currant and raspberry flavors. Alcohol content is 14 percent. I’d buy a case if it were available, but Sims made only two or three cases.

“I really want to stay in High Plains,” said Sims, “and establish it as a distinctive and reliable region.” Could we ask no less from any winemaker?

This post is the initial entry in a series that I’ll be writing about my visit to the High Plains AVA.

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