Tannat


So, My Readers, here is my annual list of the Great Wine Bargains from the previous year, except that, instead of offering you 25 examples, as I usually do, I provide 30, because there are so many excellent inexpensive wines available. The prices here range from $11 to $20. and while I realize that for some people even $18 to $20 stretches what they want to pay for a bottle of wine, I believe that you will find something on this roster fit for most every taste and pocket book. This is a gratifyingly diverse group of wines, and for the first time I welcome products from Brazil, Greece and Hungary to the line-up. Many of these examples are wines to buy by the case and keep around for a year for drinking daily, though, honestly, the point of most of these wines is not to make old bones. The primary theme is: Drink Up and Enjoy. Sensibly, of course, and in moderation.
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aia
Aia Vecchia Vermentino 2015, Toscana Maremma, Italy. Very Good+. About $12.

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alpha
Alpha Estate Turtles Vineyard Malagouzia 2015, Florina, Macedonia, Greece. 100 percent malagouzia grapes. Excellent. About $18.

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Ascevi Luwa Ronco Superiore Ceròu 2014, Friuli Isonza, Italy. 100% tocai friulano grapes. Production was 500 cases. Excellent. About $18.
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furmint
Béres Tokaji Furmint 2014, Szaraz, Hungary. 100 percent furmint grapes. Excellent. About $19.

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Bonny Doon Vineyard Vin Gris de Cigare 2015, Central Coast. 44 percent grenache grapes, 20 percent grenache blanc, 13 carignane, 10 mourvèdre, 7 cinsaut and 6 roussanne. Excellent. About $18.

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colome-torrontes
Colomé Torrontés 2015, Calchaqui Valley, Salta, Argentina. Excellent. About $15.
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Garofoli Serra del Conte 2014, Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Classico, Italy. Excellent. About $11.

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duret
Domaine Pierre Duret Quincy 2014, Loire Valley, France. 100 percent sauvignon blanc. Excellent. About $14.

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duas
Esporão Duas Castas 2014, Alentejano, Portugal. 60 percent arinto grapes and 40 percent gouveio, Excellent. About $14.

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Marco Felluga “Mongris” Pinot Grigio 2015, Collio, Italy. Excellent. About $18.
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illahe
Illahe Viognier 2015, Willamette Valley, Oregon. Excellent. About $17.

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Louis Jadot Beaujolais-Villages 2014. Excellent. About $14.
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2014_lff_tempranillo
Lee Family Farm Temprnillo 2014, Arroyo Seco, Monterey County. 53 cases produced. Excellent. About $20.

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lidio
Lidio Carraro Agnus Tannat 2014, Serra Guacha, Brazil. Very Good+. About $12.
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Masi Rosa dei Masi 2015, Rosato della Venezia, Italy. 100 percent refosco grapes. Excellent. About $15.

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gemma-rose
Masciarelle Villa Gemma 2015, Cerasuola d’Abruzzo Rose, Italy. 100 percent montepulciano d’Aruzzo grapes. Excellent. About $15.

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francois-montand-brut
Francois Montand Brut Blanc de Blancs nv, Jura, France. Very Good+. About $14.
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Morgan Albarino 2015, Monterey County. 375 cases. Excellent. About $18.
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m-cb
M de Mulonnière Chenin Blanc 2015, Anjou, Loire Valley, France. Excellent. About $15.
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forster
Weingut Eugen Müller Forster Mariengarten Riesling Kabinett 2013, Pfalz, Germany. Excellent. About $19.

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Odfjell Vineyards Armador Sauvignon Blanc 2016, Casablanca Valley, Chile. Excellent. About $14.

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pedroncelli
Pedroncelli Winery Dry Rosé of Zinfandel 2015, Dry Creek Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $12,

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Chateau Puyanché 2014, Francs Cote de Bordeaux Blanc. 75% sauvignon blanc, 25% semillon. Excellent. About $15.

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Real Compania de Vinos Tempranillo 2012, Vino de la Tierra de Castilla, Spain. Very Good+. About $12.
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selvapiana
Selvapiana Chianti Rufina 2013, Toscana, Italy. 95 percent sangiovese grapes with five percent canaiolo, colorino and malvasia nera. Excellent. About $17.
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schneider
Georg Albrecht Schneider Niersteiner Paterberg Riesling Kabinett 2013, Rheinhessen, Germany. Excellent. About $15.

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serres-rioja
Carlos Serres Crianza 1012, Rioja, Spain. 85 percent tempranillo, 15 percent garnacha. Very Good+. About $12.
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Cantina Tramin Pinot Grigio 2015, Sudtirol-Alto Adige, Italy. Excellent. About $16.

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cava
Vilarnau Brut Reserve Cava, nv. Traditional blend of 50 percent macabeo grapes, 35 percent parellada and 15 percent xarel-lo. Very Good+. About $13.
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Vina Robles Red4 2013, Paso Robles, San Luis Obispo County. 41 percent petite sirah, 40 percent syrah, 10 percent mourvedre, 9 percent grenache. Excellent. About $17.
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So, today I offer 10 red wines worthy of your attention and use with the hearty fare we prepare during cooler weather, if this country ever gets cooler weather. We’re running 10 to 15 degrees above normal in this neck o’ the woods. Anyway, these wines represent California; Italy’s Piedmont region; Australia’s McLaren Vale; and three sections of Spain, all featuring the tempranillo grape. The grapes and blends of grapes involved are equally diverse. As usual in these Weekend Wine Notes, I eschew the technical, geographical and historical I tend to dote upon for the sake of quick and incisive reviews designed to pique your interest and whet your palate. Enjoy, in moderation, of course. These wines were samples for review.
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Angeline Vineyards Reserve Pinot Noir 2015, Mendocino County 80%, Sonoma County 20%.13.9% alc. Transparent angelinemedium ruby shading to an ethereal rim; rose petals and sandalwood, pomegranate and cranberry, a hint of loam that expands to form a foundation for the whole enterprise; satiny and supple but nicely sanded and burnished by mild graphite-tinged tannins; a few minutes in the glass being in notes of wood smoke, red cherry and raspberry; grows quite dense and chewy, almost succulent but riven by straight-arrow acidity that cuts a swath on the palate; builds in power and structure. Now through 2018 or ’19. You could sell the hell out of this pinot noir in restaurant and bar wine-by-the-glass programs. Excellent. About $18, representing Great Value.
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Bonny Doon A Proper Claret 2014, California. 13.2% alc. 36% cabernet sauvignon, 22% petit verdot, 22% tannat, 9% syrah, 7% merlot, 3% cabernet franc, 1% petite sirah. The point of Bonny Doon’s A Proper Claret is that it is not a proper claret at all, not with the inclusion of tannat, syrah and petite sirah. Ho-ho. Medium ruby with a transparent magenta rim; untamed and exotic, with notes of dried berries, baking spices and flowers; opens to black fruit scents and flavors with a tinge of red fruit; firm, moderately dense, supported by plenty of dusty graphite-laden tannins and bright acidity; needs a steak or leg of lamb. Very Good+. About $16.
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Chronic Cellars Purple Paradise 2014, Paso Robles. 14.5% alc. 77% zinfandel, 14% syrah, 8% petite sirah, 1% grenache. Medium ruby hue; a feral and flinty flurry of black currants, mulberries and plums; a hint of blueberry, with cedar and mint; warm and spicy with notes of cloves and sandalwood; a high, wild baked berry tone; very dry, quite dense and chewy, firm sinewy structure packed with dusty tannins and lively acidity. Now through 2018. Very Good+. About $15.
As you can see, the label is appropriate for Halloween parties.
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Viña Eguía Tempranillo 2013, Rioja, Spain. 13.5% alc. 100% tempranillo. Medium ruby hue shading to a delicate mulberry rim; violets and rose petals, blueberries and red currants, leather and smoke; an exotic dusting of cloves, sandalwood and allspice, with a hint of the latter’s woody, slightly astringent quality; though moderate in tannins, this gains weight and heft as the minutes pass, picking up a fleshy, meaty character to the macerated and baked dark fruit flavors; animated by brisk acidity. Terrific character for the price. Now through 2018. Very Good+. About $14, marking Excellent Value.
Imported by Quintessential Wines, Napa, Calif.
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Bodegas Fariña Dama de Toro Tempranillo 2014, Toro, Spain. 13.5% alc. With 5% garnacha. Medium ruby-mulberry color; loam, dust, graphite, mint, iodine; hints of red and black currants and blueberries, permeated by dried spices and flowers; very dense, dry, smoky, chewy; smacky tannins coat the palate. What it lacks in charm it makes by for in inchoate power and dynamism. Try 2018 to ’20 with pork shoulder roast slathered in salsa verde or grilled pork chops with a cumin-chili powder rub. Very Good+. About $15.
Imported by Quintessential Wines, Napa, Calif.
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Marchesi di Gresy Barbera d’Asti 2014, Piedmont, Italy. 13% alc. 100% barbera grapes. Medium ruby-violet hue; an attractive bouquet of potpourri, dried baking spices and dried currants; hints of cedar, tobacco and lead pencil; clean and spare with plenty of acid cut for liveliness and lip-smacking tannins; pulls up elements of black cherries, mulberries and plums, all slightly spiced and macerated, and touches of cherry pit and skin; the finish is packed with earthy tannins and graphite minerality. Now through 2019 to ’22 with salumi, red meat pizzas and pasta dishes — especially pappardelle with rabbit — or aged hard cheeses. Excellent. About $18.
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2014-incredible-red-zin
Peachy Canyon Incredible Red Zinfandel 2014, California. 14.5% alc. With 2% petite sirah. Dark ruby shading lighter to an invisible rim; notes of spicy and slightly roasted black currants, cherries and plums, a strain of wild berry and white pepper and hints of wood smoke, ground cardamom and cumin; rich on the palate but tempered by loamy and velvety tannins and clean acidity; an element of dusty graphite minerality dominates the finish. A well-made zinfandel for everyday drinking. Very Good+. About $14.
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rc-temp-2013-ft
Real Compañía de Vinos Tempranillo 2012, Vino de la Tierra de Castilla, Spain. 13.5% alc. 100% tempranillo. Vibrant inky purple; a very deep, dark, warm, spicy loamy tempranillo with staggering, mineral and graphite-laced tannins that don’t prevent a hint of floral-inflected black currant and plum fruit and touches of heather, cedar and black olive from emerging from the ebon depths; there is, in fact, surprising elegance and finesse at play in the balance between structure, acid, fruit and oak elements. Drink now through 2018 or ’19. Very Good+. About — I’m not kidding — $12, a Remarkable Value.
Imported by Quintessential Wines, Napa, Calif.
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Robert Oatley GSM 2014, McLaren Vale, Australia. 13.5% alc. 48% grenache, 47% syrah, 5% oatleymourvèdre. Dark ruby with a lighter magenta rim; ripe and spicy notes of roasted plums and currants, with traces of red licorice and leather, briers and brambles; a few moments in the glass bring in alluring touches of allspice and sandalwood, dried sage and rosemary; dry, dusty and slightly austere tannins serve as foundation for lithe, supple black and red fruit flavors boosted by fleet acidity and graphite minerality. For all its structure, the wine is juicy, seductive and tasty. Drink now through 2018 or ’19. Excellent. About $20.
Imported by Pacific Highway Wines & Spirits, Greensboro, N.C.
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Vina Robles Vineyards & Winery Red4 2013, Paso Robles, San Luis Obispo County. 14.9% alc. 41% petite sirah, 40% syrah, 10% mourvèdre, 9% grenache. Dark ruby-magenta color; redolent of macerated and slightly baked mixed berries, cloves and iodine, espresso, wood smoke and roasted fennel — heady stuff indeed; a lightly resistant dusty, velvety texture bolstered by persistent tannins packed with graphite and loam; a long expressive finish. A lot going on here for the price. Drink now through 2018. Excellent. About $17.
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Dick Troon planted vines in southern Oregon’s Applegate Valley in 1972, making him a pioneer in the state by any standards. He sold the winery and vineyards to his friend and fishing buddy Larry Martin in 2003, and Martin took the opportunity to start almost from scratch, reshaping the landscape and building a new facility. The philosophy at Troon Vineyard is as hands-off as possible, and includes the use of indigenous yeast, foot-treading and minimal contact with new oak. In fact, the three wines under consideration today — a malbec, a tannat and a blend of the two — each age 18 months in mature or neutral French oak, only two percent new barrels. Another recent change brings on Craig Camp as general manager. Many consumers and wine professionals will remember Camp for the turn-around he orchestrated for Cornerstone Cellars in Napa Valley, bringing that primarily cabernet sauvignon producer into new markets at several levels and cementing its national reputation. The Applegate Valley AVA was approved in 2000. It is enclosed by the Rogue Valley AVA, itself part of the much larger Southern Oregon AVA.

These wines were samples for review.
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troon malbec
The Troon Malbec 2013, Rouge Valley, Southern Oregon, displays an intense dark ruby hue, a radiant presage for a deep, intense spicy wine that revels, with brooding and breeding, in its ripe raspberry and plum scents and flavors, its dusty graphite element and its hints of lavender, violets and woodsy spice. The wine is quite dry, fairly loamy, briery and brambly, enlivened by clean, bright acidity and shaded by dense but lissome tannins. 13.7 percent alcohol. One of the best malbecs around. Production was 213 cases Excellent. About $29.
The label image is one vintage later than the wine reviewed here.
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The stablemate to the wine mentioned above is the Troon Estate Tannant 2013, Applegate Valley, Southern Oregon, a tannat so dark in its ruby-purple hue that it verges on motor-oil ebony. Notes of black plums, cherries and currants are infused with hints of cloves, cedar and tobacco, with a touch of ripe blueberry. Despite its depth, darkness and dimension, there’s nothing rustic about the wine, and in fact it’s more subtle and nuanced with detail than you would think, though it pulses with power and energy. The finish is sleek and chiseled with graphite and granitic minerality. 13.7 percent alcohol. A superior tannat. Production was 213 cases. Excellent. About $28.
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troon reserve mt
Finally, of this trio, we have the Troon M*T Reserve 2013, Southern Oregon, a blend of — to be precise — 55.67 percent malbec and 44.33 percent tannat. Again, no surprise, this is a deep, dark wine that burgeons with dark savory, salty baked plum and currant scents and flavors, the latter bolstered by dry brushy tannins, dusty graphite and vibrant acidity. A few moments in the glass unfurl notes of briery, woody and slightly raspy notes of raspberry and blueberry and undertones of oolong tea and orange rind, all balanced by a sense of spareness and paradoxically elegant poise. 13.7 percent alcohol. An unusual and fruitful combination. Production was 195 cases. Excellent. About $50.
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So, something important is happening in Brazil now, right? Ha ha, I’m kidding of course! The Olympics are happening in Rio, and I have to say that Aly Raisman’s floor exercise last night looked flawless to me, what were the deductions for? Still, she got the silver medal, or, as the commentators say, she “silvered.” Anyway, to show that we can be timely here on BTYH, I offer as Wine of the Day a robust and inexpensive Brazilian red wine that would be terrific with hearty fare like barbecue ribs, grilled steaks and pork chops, braised meats and goat (or “goat-like creatures”) roasted over an open fire. The Lidio Carraro Agnus Tannat 2014, Serra Guacha, displays a glossy deep ruby-black hue shading to a glowing magenta rim; it’s a big-hearted, two-fisted red, whose fervent aromas and flavors of black currants, cherries and plums are shot through with notes of tar and leather, lavender and violets, all propelled across the palate by vibrant acidity, glittering graphite and moderate but dusty, chewy tannins. What more could you ask for at the price, at least in terms of personality? 13.5 percent alcohol. Production was about 1,000 cases. Winemaker was Monica Rossetti. Very Good+. About — hold your breath! — $12.

Imported by Winebow, Inc., New York. A sample for review.

Does Randall Grahm need four rosé wines among his current releases from Bonny Doon roseVineyard? One would have to take a dusky stroll through the shadowy, convoluted corridors of Grahm’s imagination to find an answer to that question. Sufficient to our task is the presence of these products — samples for review — not all of which are as straightforward as the term rosé would indicate. Two of these wines are based on Rhone Valley grape varieties, not a surprise since Bonny Doon specializes in wines made from such grapes, but another was made from ciliegiolo grapes, a distaff cousin or bastard child, as it were, to sangiovese, while the last is composed of grapes from France’s southwest region, tannat and cabernet franc. One of the wines produced from Rhone-style grapes aged in glass containers outside for nine months, a process that drained color from the wine and added a slightly oxidized, sherry-like character. Whatever the case, I guarantee that you will be intrigued and fascinated, if not delighted by these wines, which are arranged in order of hue from left to right, as indicated by the image above.
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The Bonny Doon Vineyard Vin Gris de Cigare is always a favorite rosé in our 15_VinGris_Domestic_750house, and the version for 2015, carrying a Central Coast designation, is no different. A blend of 44 percent grenache grapes, 20 percent grenache blanc, 13 carignane, 10 mourvèdre, 7 cinsaut and 6 roussanne, the wine offers a hue of the most ineffable pale pink, like the blush on a nymph’s thigh, and delicate, breezy aromas of watermelon, raspberry, strawberry, thyme and wet flint. Crisp acidity keeps this rosé keen and lively, while its macerated red berry flavors make it delicious and easy to drink; a background of limestone provides structure. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through the end of 2016. Exquisite poise, balance and freshness. Excellent. About $18.
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Tuile is the French word for the curved roof-tiles ubiquitous in the South of France 14_SunWine_082415(and also the term for the curved cookies that resemble them). The pale orange-brick color of the Bonny Doon Vineyard Vin Gris Tuilé 2013, Central Coast, resembles the hue of those roofs, to some extent, but also refers to a relatively obscure practice of leaving young wine exposed to the elements to mature. Composed of 55 percent grenache grapes, 23 percent mourvèdre, 10 roussanne, 7 cinsaut, 3 carignane, 2 grenache blanc, this wine was left al fresco for nine months in glass demijohns or carboys; the result is a sherry-like wine that displays fresh and appealing aromas of almonds and orange peel, spiced tea, smoke and cloves. True to the red grapes from which it primarily originated — the grenache, mourvedre, cinsaut and carignane — the wine displays a rooty, foresty element that bolsters notes of spiced pear, hibiscus and apricot and an aura that’s altogether savory and saline. 13 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018 or ’19. Intriguing and ephemeral, but with real spine. Production was 192 cases. Excellent. About $26.
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Tracy Hills is a small AVA, approved in 2006 by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, that straddles San Joaquin and Stanislaus counties about 55 miles south-southeast of San Francisco in the Central Valley. The Bonny Doon Il Ciliegiolo Rosato 2015, Mt. Oso Vineyard, Tracy Hills, marks the first time I have seen this AVA on a label. The ciliegiolo grape, from the Italian for “cherry,” is related to sangiovese, but whether as a parent or off-spring is a matter of dispute. Made from 100 percent ciliegiolo grapes, this rosé exhibits a bright cerise hue and aromas of cherries, cherries, cherries in every form — fresh, dried, spiced and macerated — with notes of wild strawberries and raspberries, a flush of rhubarb and pomegranate, a hint of tomato skin. It’s a woodsy rosé, sun-drenched, a bit dusty, quite dry and delivering some graphite-tinged tannins from mid-palate through the finish. 12.4 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018. One of the more interesting and complex rosés I have encountered. Production was 442 cases. Excellent. About $24. (A release for the winery’s DEWN Club.)
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The Bonny Doon A Proper Pink 2015, California, joins the roster of the winery’s “Proper” brand, and while the wines are serious, the back-label verbiage is strictly faux-British tongue-in-cheek — and rather long-winded, old boy. Composed, unusually, of 61 percent tannat grapes and 39 percent cabernet franc, the wine offers a provocative cherry-red color shading to salmon; it’s a warm, sunny, fleshy rosé that features aromas of spiced and macerated raspberries and strawberries and notes of tomato leaf and almond skin; a few minutes in the glass bring in hints of briers, orange rind and sour melon candy. A lip-smacking texture is leavened by lively acidity and a dusty quality like damp roof tiles. 13 percent alcohol. Now through 2017. Very Good+. About $16.
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It’s not easy to grow European wine grapes in hot and humid Brazil, and in fact the center of the vast country’s wine industry lies in the southernmost state of Rio Grande do Sul, as far as you can get away from the Equator (marked in red on the accompanying map) and still be in Brazil. In that state, most of the vineyards and wineries are in the hilly region of Serra Gaúcha. Wherever grape-growing occurs in Brazil, mostly what is produced are table grapes of American origin; the most widely grown grape in the country is Isabelle, a cultivar of the species Vitis labrusca, the native American grapes. Attempts made to introduce European or Vitis vinifera grapes beginning in the 16th Century were largely unsuccessful. The advent of Italian immigrants in the 1870s brought greater success to establishing vineyards and making wine, but it took another 100 years before truly serious efforts began, mainly because of the infusion of capital from European companies like Moët & Chandon, Seagrams, Domecq and Martini & Rossi.

Another problem that winemakers face in Brazil is that it is not a wine-drinking nation, suffering from low per-capita consumption and a general attitude that wine is not part of everyday culinary culture. In addition, the different taxing situations among Brazil’s states make dealing with logistics difficult.

Still, the industry seems to be growing, and perhaps because of that factor, I introduce the first Brazilian wines that I have ever reviewed, not only on this blog but in my entire career writing about wine. This pair issued from the country’s oldest winery, Vinicola Salton, which traces its origin to 1878, when Antonio Domenico Salton, an immigrant from Italy’s Veneto region, arrived in Rio Grande do Sul. His seven sons took over the business in 1910 and established the winery and vineyards on a firmer viticultural basis. Salton is still operated by the family, in its fourth generation. The products of Vinicola Salton are brought to American by A & M Imports in Baltimore. These wines were samples for review.

So, the Salton Intenso Brut, Serra Gaúcha, is a delightful but not particularly intense blend of 70 percent chardonnay and 30 percent riesling grapes. Made in the Charmat method in which the second fermentation is induced in large tanks, this sparkling wine displays a pale gold color and a constant stream of small bubbles. Aromas of green apples and spiced pear, with hints of seashell and roasted lemon, tantalize the nose; the wine is crisp and lively, slightly tropical — guava and pineapple — and just off-dry on the palate though the finish is a bit drier; a few moments in the glass bring in notes of almond and almond blossom. Similar to prosecco but with more body and presence. 12.5 percent alcohol. Very Good. About $15 to $17.

The Salton Classic Tannat 2013, Serra Gaúcha, is pretty much what you would expect from a red wine at the price — robust, acidic, a bit rough around the edges but a decent drink with the right food. The color is dark ruby, the bouquet delivers vivid notes of blueberries and red and black currants with touches of graphite, violets and bitter chocolate, and in the mouth the wine strikes a swath of tannin and acid on the tongue. 13 percent alcohol. Reserve this for burgers, barbecue, braised meat and rustic pasta dishes. Good+. About $10 to $12.

“Brazil State RioGrandedoSul” by Raphael Lorenzeto de Abreu – Own work. Licensed under CC BY 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Brazil_State_RioGrandedoSul.svg#/media/File:Brazil_State_RioGrandedoSul.svg

El Porvenir de Cafayate is a 40-year-old estate located high in the Andean foothills of the Cafayate Valley in the province of Salta, about 520 miles north of the city of Mendoza, in northwest Argentina. Owned by the Romero family, El Porvenir is run by Lucia Romero-Marcuzzi (seen in this image), with winemaker Mariano Quiroga Adamo and consultant Paul Hobbs from California, concentrating on torrontés and tannat grapes but making wine from many other varieties as well. How high? These are some of the highest elevation vineyards in the world, ranging from 5,413 to 5,577 feet above sea-level. The semi-desert climate is very dry, with warm days and cold nights, and the poor soil demands of grapes that they send roots far down in search of water and nutrients. The vineyards at El Porvenir de Cafayate are farmed using sustainable methods, including no pesticides and spare deployment of herbicides. I thought that generally these were well-made and stylish wines that exhibited gratifying character — with one exception, the oak-fermented Laborum Single Vineyard Torrontés 2013. I’ll speak more about this wine when its turn comes.

Paul Hobbs Imports, Sebastopol, Calif. Samples for review.
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The color of El Porvenir de Cafayate Amauta Absoluto Torrontés 2012, Cafayate, Salta, is a tranquil very pale gold; enticing aromas of jasmine and camellia, lime and grapefruit are tinged with notes of lemon balm and bees-wax. The wine is made in stainless steel tanks and undergoes malolactic fermentation, the chemical transformation of sharp malic (“apple-like”) acid into smooth lactic (“milk-like”) acid. The result is not lush or creamy but a lovely silken texture that feels spun from gossamer clouds. Stone-fruit flavors are energized by hints of grapefruit rind and limestone minerality, while the finish brings in touches of melon and almond skin bitterness. 13.1 percent alcohol. Production was 850 cases. With its gentle floral nature, winsome balance between citrus and stone-fruit and its slight tension between sprightly acidity, on the one hand, and moderate richness, on the other, I think that this is as good as the torrontés grape gets and deserves to be. Excellent. About $16, a Rare Value.
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I believe that wine from some grapes cannot be improved by putting it through an oak regimen; I started to write “by throwing oak at it,” but I’ll be more circumspect. Anyway, that process merely lays a burden of wood on the wine that interferes with its inherent nature. One such grape is torrontés, a grape and a wine whose essential delicacy and lovely simplicity can be marred by the oak experience. El Porvenir Laborum Single Vineyard Torrontés 2013, Cafayate, Salta, fermented in new French oak barrels and aged in barrels for six months. The color is pale straw-gold; the nose offers touches of green apple, lime peel, melon and jasmine and a background of woody/woodsy/spicy notes; a distracting hint of vanilla seems like nothing that should ever happen to torrontés (or any wine). The oak lends the wine a seductive supple texture that permeates slightly roasted and honeyed lemon and peach flavors. Overall, you feel the oak as a superfluous drag on the wine, a dimension that detracts from its typical delightful character. Is this example a “better” torrontés than one made without oak? I don’t think so. 13.2 percent alcohol. Production was 540 cases. Very Good. About $22.
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Now we turn to the reds.

First, El Porvenir Amauta Corte 1 — Inspiration 2013, Cafayate, Salta, a blend of 60 percent malbec grapes, 30 percent cabernet sauvignon and 10 percent syrah. The grapes fermented in stainless steel, and the wine aged eight months in second-use French and American oak barrels, meaning that the wine was not exposed to new wood. The color is intense ruby-purple; intense, also, are the aromas of ripe and spicy black currants, black cherries and plums permeated by notes of tar, espresso, bitter chocolate and graphite. Intense, again, are the succulent black and red fruit flavors that reveal hints of black tea, fruitcake and violets over a tide of moderately plush, dusty tannins. 14.5 percent alcohol. Production was 1,250 cases. Man up to grilled pork chops with a coffee rub or braised veal shanks with this bottle, now through 2017 to ’19. Very Good+. About $23.
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El Porvenir Amauta Absoluto Tannat 2014, Cafayate, Salta, is the estate’s entry-level tannat offering, and it’s worth the price for pairing with burgers and chorizo quesadillas, hearty pasta dishes and sausage pizza or goat empanadas. The color is dark ruby with a purple rim; aromas of black and blue fruit meld with notes of fruitcake and tapenade, mint and coffee and leather and a whiff of potpourri. The wine is dense and chewy, enlivened by bright acidity and given some bearing by dusty tannins, all deftly melded into a sleek package. 14.5 percent alcohol. Production was 1,667 cases. Very Good+. About $16, representing Good Value.
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A wine like El Porvenir Laborum Tannat 2013, Cafayate, Salta, could convince me that tannat is the red grape that Argentine growers should be cultivating, rather than malbec. The color is dark ruby-purple with a magenta rim; boy, it’s one ripe, fleshy, meaty wine, packed with notes of rich black currant, blueberry and black cherry fruit loaded with tar, leather, violets and roasted coffee beans. The wine spent 12 months in new French oak barrels and absorbed that wood pretty handily, in the form of a firm and lithe structure, but there’s also real tannic grip on the palate, freighted with dusty graphite and an iodine and iron finish. The intense. minty and deeply spicy black fruit flavors shine through, but this could still use a year or two to unfurl a bit. 14.7 percent alcohol. Production was 540 cases. Excellent. About $34.
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