Rose wines


Imagine being so famous that people can use your first name and everyone knows who they’re talking about. As in: “Fredric just posted to his blog,” and billions of earthlings go “oooohhh” and “aaaahhh.” Anyway, as multitudes are aware, the Hollywood stars Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, in partnership with the Perrin family of Chateau de Beaucastel in Chateauneuf-du-Pape, last year released the first wine from their Chateau Miraval property, a Côtes de Provence Rosé 2012. I didn’t try that wine but we just drank the second release, the Chateau Miraval 2013, and it’s a honey. Every aspect of this product is thoughtfully and exquisitely executed, including the elegant bottle that resembles an old-style Champagne bottle, and the understated, even reticent label. The wine is a blend of the red cinsault, grenache and syrah grapes with a dollop of the white rolle, the Italian vermentino. The entrancing color is the palest copper-onion skin-topaz with the faintest pink flush; aromas of fresh strawberries and dried red currants are subtly woven with notes of dried thyme, flint and limestone, with a hint of tangerine. Though in its nuanced red fruit flavors this rose is slightly savory and saline, it embodies the utmost in delicate and ineffable character, while retaining the vibrancy of definitive acidity and the vitality of a scintillating mineral element. Compulsively drinkable, and without the taint of amateurish that often comes with “celebrity” wines; this is the real thing. 13 percent alcohol. Excellent. Prices around the country range from about $24 to $30.

Imported by Vineyard Brands, Birmingham, Ala. Sample provided by a local retailer.

I can’t say a great deal about most of these wines, because they were tasted on the fly or at a buffet lunch or dinner during my sojourn in the High Plains AVA (indicated in the map) back in the month of May. And My Readers throughout the country will recognize that the enterprise is inherently unfair in relationship to their curiosity because very few wines produced in the Lone Star State are available beyond its irregular borders. Naturally, this circumstance disturbs winemakers in Texas, because they know that many of the wines that issue from their doors are fine enough to stand up to any in the U.S.A. (No state, of course, has a monopoly on mediocre wines.) Texas has slightly more than 200 wineries; 95 percent of the wine is consumed inside the state. Obviously in a three-day visit, the main purpose being to tour vineyards and interview owners and growers, I could experience only the tiniest fraction of vinous products and those primarily relating to High Plains grapes. Still, I thought that it would be friendly and decent to give a shout-out to the wines that stood above the pack. I’ll say that some of the pricing structure seems inflated, if not downright grandiose. If you’re passing through Texas, however, you might want to investigate some of these wines at retail stores or perhaps visit the wineries. Most will be happy to ship for you if the state you live in allows the practice.
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McPherson Les Copains Rosé 2013, Texas, about $11. A delicate blend of 55 percent cinsault, 30 percent mourvèdre and 15 percent viognier. Kim McPherson is the son of “Doc” McPherson, one of the founders of seminal High Plains winery Llano Estacado, in Lubbock. McPherson Cellars is also in Lubbock and occupies an old Coca-Cola bottling plant from the 1930s. This is one of the best rosés I’ve had all year.
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It’s a consensus ( or fervent hope) in the High Plains of Texas AVA that tempranillo is the grape that will turn the tide and bring national attention to the region, though there’s a back-bench movement for montepulciano. This belief indicates a general segue in High Plains away from “classic” grapes like chardonnay, merlot and cabernet sauvignon to grapes that reflect the hot dry climate and its similarity to some areas of Spain, Italy and southern France. I probably tried more wines made from tempranillo grapes (or blends) while I was in High Plains than all the other wines combined; these four were certainly the best:

1. Becker Reserve Tempranillo 2012, about $19
2. Lewis Wines Newsom Vineyard Tempranillo 2011, High Plains. About $32(?). Neal Newsom is a prominent grower in High Plains.
3. Lost Oak Tempranillo 2012, about $33. (The winery is in Burleson, south of Fort Worth.)
4. Inwood Estates Vineyards Cornelious Reserve 2012, 100 percent tempranillo from the Inwood Block at Newsom Vineyards. About $69. (See next entry for more about Inwood.)
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Dan Gatlin is a wine pioneer in Texas, an outspoken and controversial figure. There’s no denying, though, that he is a brilliant winemaker or that his Inwood Estates wines, authentic and highly individual, are difficult to forget once you taste them. Gatlin’s chardonnays undergo no barrel-fermentation or malolactic and have what he called “a brief exposure to oak.” Both the 2012 and ’13 are notable chardonnays, the ’12 deftly balanced between elegance and weight, with prominent stony minerality and hints of pineapple, cloves and baked peaches; the ’13 suave, supple yet a little earthy, almost briery, showing chalky-flint elements. These are from Dallas County; they run about $40. Despite the movement toward Mediterranean basin grapes, cabernet sauvignon is still grown in High Plains; Gatlin’s Inwood Estates Mericana Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Newsom Vineyards, about $70, was definitively the best that I tasted.
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As testament to the affinity of Texas High Plains climate to the grapes of southern France and Spain, I tasted these three wines on every occasion they were offered and kept going back for more. The “Reddy” refers to Vijay Reddy, a prominent grower in High Plains.

1. Bending Branch Reddy Vineyard Mourvèdre 2011, Texas Hill Country, 145 cases, about $28.
2. Brushy Creek Reddy Vineyards Tannat 2008, Texas, about $20.
3. Brushy Creek Rachel’s Reserve Carignane 2010, Martin’s Vineyards, Texas. About $25.
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Tin Barn Vineyards produces small amounts of compelling single-vineyard wines, especially in the range of their syrahs. Winemaker and co-owner is Mike Lancaster. The winery is named for a twisting road that runs along the Sonoma coastline, though physically it occupies a metal building in an industrial park; nothing fancy, so the focus is on the wines. Tin Barn wines are available in California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Montana, Nevada, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Vermont and Virginia and of course by direct shipment if your state allows. They’re definitely Worth a Search.

These wines were samples for review.
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The not yet released Tin Barn Coryelle Fields Vineyard Syrah 2011, Sonoma Coast, displays a deep ruby-purple color and intoxicating aromas of lavender and lilac, black licorice and potpourri, leather, spiced and macerated blueberries, black currants and plums, with undertones of smoke, graphite and loam; pretty heady stuff, indeed. In the mouth, the wine is clean, intense and penetrating, with a chewy, supple texture, spare, moderately dusty tannins, and some reticence about the black fruit flavors. It’s packed with earth and graphite, briers and brambles, and while the bouquet expands and becomes more evocative and seductive, the structure gets more rigorous. 14.4 percent alcohol. Best from 2015 through 2020 to ’23. Excellent expression of the grape. Production and price N/A.
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The winery’s current release is the Tin Barn Coryelle Fields Syrah 2010, Sonoma Coast, a wine of lovely heft, tone and balance. The color is medium ruby with a tinge of magenta; notes of spicy and slightly fleshy plums, black currants and mulberries are wrapped in potpourri, lavender and leather; a few moments in the glass bring out hints of violets and rose petals, sandalwood and cloves, briers and loam. The wine aged 18 months in French oak, 50 percent new barrels, a regimen that lends subtle spice and a mildly dense texture. Brisk acidity keeps it lively and appealing, while red and black fruit flavors are ripe, meaty and juicy. Still, the finish is a tad austere, a thicket of brambles, dried porcini, classic wet dog and forest floor. 13,8 percent alcohol. Production was 76 cases. Excellent. About $25, and definitely Worth a Search.
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If you can find a bottle of the Tin Barn Coryelle Fields Syrah 2009, Sonoma Coast, clasp it to your bosom like a long-lost friend. At four and a half years old, this syrah offers a massively dark purple color with a motor oil sheen and is distinctly earthy, rooty and leathery. The wine aged 26 months in French oak, 66 percent new barrels. Loads of deeply spiced and macerated blue and black fruit flavors are bolstered by smooth, lithe tannins, graphite and spicy, smoky oak for an effect that delivers length and dimension of lordly degree, yet the winsome appealing element is not neglected. 15.4 percent alcohol, though you feel no heat on the finish or over-ripeness. 123 cases. Now through 2018 to ’20. Excellent. About $25.
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Now to the grandaddy of the previous wines. The Tin Barn Coryelle Fields Syrah 2003, Sonoma Coast, opens most ethereally and then gains power and structure in the glass. It sports a dark ruby color and a softly spiced and macerated character of raspberries and currents, shot with cloves, allspice and sandalwood. Behind moderately chewy tannins lies a bedrock of graphite and slightly chalky granitic minerality; some time in the glass brings out notes of cedar, tobacco and mushroomy loam. The whole effect is vibrant and resonant, mature, well-developed and delicious. The wine aged 18 months in French oak, 50 percent new barrels. 14.4 percent alcohol. Production was 327 cases. Now through 2015 or ’16. Excellent. About $32.
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The delightful Tin Barn Joon Rose of Syrah 2013, Sonoma Coast, glimmers with a pale copper-salmon robe and delivers a radiant bouquet of ripe strawberries and raspberries with touches of peach and tomato skin; a few moments develop notes of loam, mulberry and pomegranate and just a hint of limestone. This is exuberantly lively yet almost lush in texture, resulting in rather exquisite balance between acidity and structure. 13.3 percent alcohol. Drink through the end of 2014. Production was 86 cases. Excellent. About $23.
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Domaine de la Bastide occupies the sort of compound and possesses the kind of history that make American Francophiles swoon. Built as a fortified farmhouse by the Knights Templar in the 12th or 13th Century, it became, after the suppression of the Templars by Philip IV in 1307, first a Benedictine and then a Dominican monastery. Defrocked, as it were, during the French Revolution, the ancient property passed through various hands, until it came under ownership of the Boyer family. The estate, lying in the heart of the Southern Rhone Valley about 34 miles north of Avignon, is run today by Vincent and Stephanie Boyer. This domaine is not properly a bastide. Those “new towns” were built in southwestern France in the 13th and 14th centuries to help repopulate the area after the devastation of the Albigensian Crusade (or the Slaughter of the Cathars, if you believe that the gentle sect should have been left in peace). If you visit Bordeaux, for example, the landscape, especially in Entre-Deux-Mers, is filled with these medieval market towns, laid out in a distinctive grid, their commercial squares surrounded by arcades.

Anyway, the Domaine de la Bastide “Figue” 2013, Côtes du Rhône Rosé, is an interesting example of the genre because it’s made from white grapes: viognier, grenache blanc and clairette. (The wine’s nickname derives from the many old fig trees on the property.) The ethereal pale onion skin hue is the result of skin contact, even though the skins of white grapes contain very little pigment. The wine is a congeries of delicate nuance, tissues of hints and nods: A scent of slightly overblown Summer roses precedes subtle notes of green apple, red currants, faint peach and a touch of melon; a few moments in the glass bring out a wisp of dried thyme. This fresh and refined rose offers a surprisingly lush and vibrant texture buoyed by pert acidity and a scintillating limestone element; lilac comes into the mix, a touch of talc, a tinge of sour melon and lemon drop. In a sense, one could call this a white wine gently disguised as rosé. 13 percent alcohol. A lovely wine for drinking through 2014. Very Good+ and a Bargain at about $14.

Bonhomie Wine Imports, South Orange, N.J. A sample for review.

Here’s a rosé to entice lovers of all things delicate and elegant. The J Vineyards Vin Gris 2013, Russian River Valley, is 100 percent pinot noir, made all in stainless steel and was bottled a scant three months ago. “Vin gris” means “gray wine” in French, though the color here isn’t so much gris as it is a very pale copper salmon hue, like pink parchment. Ethereal scents of strawberries, raspberries and red currants, slightly spiced and macerated, are wreathed with notes of orange rind and pomegranate, with a hint of limestone in the background; a few moments in the glass bring up a touch of lilac. Pert acidity keeps this rose crisp and lively, while the wine’s texture comes close to being lush; it’s the balance between those elements that lends a bit of animation and electricity on the palate. Flavors of red currants and watermelon are effortlessly buoyed by dusty, brambly flint-like qualities, all notions woven into an ephemeral silken finish. Alcohol content is 14.3 percent. Drink through the end of 2014 with all fare related to the porch, the patio, poolside or picnic. Closed with a screw-cap, so it doesn’t matter if you forgot the corkscrew, again. Winemaker was Melissa Stackhouse. Excellent. About $20.

A sample for review.

When I begin a post that way — “Worth a Search” — you know, My Readers, that the wines under review are limited in production. That’s certainly true of these three examples from Idlewild Wines, a project run by Sam Bilbro and Jessica Boone Bilbro. There’s a certain pedigree; Sam’s father, Chris Bilbro, started Marietta cellars in 1979, and Sam grew up in the wine business. Jessica has a degree in zoology but fell in love with winemaking and worked at Edgewood Estate, Armida Winery and Passalacqua. Idlewild is a small young winery at the vanguard of what’s most important in California now. No chardonnay or sauvignon blanc, no cabernet sauvignon or pinot noir is made here. Instead, we have out-of-the-way French and Italian grape varieties like grenache gris, arneis, cortese. Alcohol levels are moderate. New oak dares not show its face. Meticulous attention to detail is made, yet the wines are more nurtured and encouraged than manipulated. Prices are reasonable. I am, frankly, deeply enamored of these wines and wish that they were made in quantities to render them more accessible to My Readers. That not being the case, you’ll have to search them out. They’re lovely wines for drinking this Summer.

These wines were samples for review. Images from idlewildwines.com

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The Yorkville Highlands AVA, in Mendocino County, was approved in 1998. Its rocky outcroppings separate Mendocino’s Anderson Valley from Sonoma County’s Alexander Valley. The Idlewild Vin Gris 2013, Yorkville Highlands, is made completely from grenache grapes briefly macerated, slowly fermented in stainless steel tanks and aged four months in neutral oak barrels. The color is very pale onion skin, almost parchment; everything is subtle and nuanced; my comment on Facebook was “Tissues of delicacy woven on a steel loom,” and I stand by that assessment. Hints of peach and yellow plum, with some of the pithiness of the stone; notes of mandarin orange and grapefruit zest; summer flowers in a dry meadow; the whole package fresh and refreshing but offering pleasing density and impact on the palate; the texture is soft and appealing but enlivened by a slap of crystalline acidity. Does rose get any better than this? Not in my book. Alcohol NA. Drink into 2015. Production was 200 cases. Excellent. About $22.
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Grenache gris is a pinkish-gray mutation of the red grenache grape, rarely found even in the South of France and then usually not made into its own wine. It is not the same as grenache blanc. The grapes for the Idlewild Grenache Gris 2013, Mendocino, derive from vines at Gibson Ranch in McDowell Valley that are more than 100 years old. The grapes were foot-trod rather than crushed mechanically; after fermentation, the wine aged four months in neutral French oak barrels. The color is radiant mulberry-tourmaline; the nose is pure raspberry and black currants with hints of rose petals, rhubarb and pomegranate, summer meadows, pomander (cloves, allspice and citrus). A few moments in the glass bring in notes of tomato skin and slightly mushroomy earthiness; this is very much a wine of the garden and the fields, lightly herbal and savory and altogether wild and alluring. In style, it resembles a Bordeaux clairette, falling between a rose and a light-bodied red wine. 12.9 percent alcohol. Truly lovely and unusual. Drink through 2015. Production was 230 cases. Excellent. About $22.
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Not much arneis is grown in the U.S.A., but the wine that Sam Bilbro and Jessica Boone Bilbro make from the Fox Hill Vineyard, southeast of Ukiah, on Mendocino’s Talmage Bench, rivals many of the examples that I have tasted from Piedmont, the grape’s home. The color of the Idlewild Fox Hill Vineyard Arneis 2013, Mendocino, is brilliant light gold; aromas of bees’-wax, lanolin, honeysuckle and jasmine are wreathed with spiced pear, along with a slightly honeyed aura and almond notes. The wine is dry, silky and supple, laid over a foundation of dusky earthy and herbal elements, lime and roasted lemon flavors and a touch of grapefruit bitterness and limestone on the finish; some time in the glass brings hints of lychee and mango to the fore. A beguiling blend of limpid transparency and steel-like scaffolding. 13.6 percent alcohol. Production was 145 cases. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $28.
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Perhaps we should all be like the young doctor whose party in the Mississippi Delta we attended some 20 years ago. He poured magnums of Chateau Margaux 1981 as house wine, and folks were knocking it back as if the night would never end. As we were trying to leave, he insisted that we finish a bottle of Echezeaux ’59; I forget the name of the producer. (He wasn’t so happy with me the next morning, after he found out that I kicked a couple of ivories off his grand piano, but that’s another story. I did apologize.) The point is that some people in a highly elevated and rarefied realm can drink great wine all the time, while most people — including yours truly — make do with more ordinary vinous material. And isn’t that really as it should be? Would we not find a constant regimen of the world’s best wines cloying, tiring, demanding? Well, perhaps not, but most consumers are content with wines that don’t require deep thought and a fund of fiduciary prowess to obtain. Here, then, are eight decent quaffs — four white, four red — drinkable, enjoyable and not overly complicated wines to accompany all sorts of meals and occasions. Nothing flamboyant or brilliant here, just wines that you would not be unhappy to sip with friends and family around the table. No need for a lot of technical folderol; just read these brief reviews and go buy a selection to get you through the next few weeks. Enjoy!

These wines were samples for review.
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Alamos Torrontes 2013, Salta, Argentina. 13% alc. Very pale gold hue; jasmine and camellia, spiced pear, yellow plum and a hint of peach; notes of lilac, roasted fennel and ginger; spare, crisp, lively, very dry; shimmering acidity and limestone minerality. Quite tasty. Drink up. Very Good. About $13.
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Apothic White Winemaker’s Blend 2012, California. (A Gallo label.) 12% alc. Chardonnay, pinot grigio, riesling. Light gold color; jasmine and honeysuckle, spiced pear and slightly over-ripe peach; muscat-like muskiness, with a touch of lychee; sweet entry tamed by crisp acidity to a dry finish. Quite enjoyable. Drink up. Very Good. About $14.
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Wente “Louis Mel” Sauvignon Blanc 2012, Livermore Valley, California. 13% alc. Light gold color; fresh, clean and crisp; roasted lemon, notes of quince and ginger, lime peel and grapefruit, mildly grassy and herbal; spicy and savory; falls off a bit in the middle but offers nice follow-through with the spice-and-limestone-laced finish. Drink up. Very Good. About $15.
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Garzon Sauvignon Blanc 2013, Uruguay. 13% alc. Very pale gold; lime peel and grapefruit, pea shoot, lemongrass and celery seed, lilac and caraway; super fresh and refreshing; brings in notes of roasted lemon and fig; needs more verve and attitude in mid-palate but a delicious sip of sauvignon blanc. Drink up. Very Good. About $17.
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Pedroncelli friends.red 2012, Sonoma County. 13.9% alc. Merlot, syrah, zinfandel, petite sirah. Dark ruby-purple color; warmly stacked with cloves and allspice, ripe black currant, plum and mulberry scents and flavors; notes of briers, brambles and loam, touch of graphite; mainly supported by sleek tannins and a bit of oak. Easy-going with a hint of seriousness. Drink through 2014. Very Good. About $12, making Fine Value.
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Tercos Bonarda 2011, Mendoza, Argentina. 13.9% alc. 100% bonarda grapes. Dark ruby color; earthy, rooty and sappy; ripe and spicy black currants, plums and blueberries, with a touch of dried fruit, fruitcake and pomander; mouth-filling, dense and chewy, notes of tar and beet-root; tannic and savory. Intriguing character for the price. Drink through 2014. Very Good. About $13.
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Vino dei Fratelli Primitivo 2011, Puglia, Italy. 13% alc. 100% primitivo grapes. Dark ruby-purple color; currants, plums and blueberries, cloves and graphite; dusty tannins and a velvety texture; hints of zinfandel-like briers and brambles; tasty, substantial. Now through 2015. Very Good. About $15.
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Fratelli Chianti 2011, Toscana, Italy. 13.5% 100% sangiovese. Medium ruby color; warm and spicy, laden with graphite minerality and loam; red and black cherries and currants, smoky and a little plummy; chewy, satiny tannins, dark and spicy with notes of black olive, orange zest and bitter chocolate-covered black cherries. Lots of personality. Where’s the rabbit ragu? Through 2014. Very Good+. About $15, Excellent Value.
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I am averse to making a limited edition product the Wine of the Week because it just ain’t fair to My Readers. On the other hand, the Cornerstone Stepping Stone Corallina 2013, Napa Valley, is that rare rosé of such character and quality that I don’t want you to miss it, though it must be marked Worth a Search. Made completely from syrah grapes given a long cool fermentation in stainless steel tanks and aged five months in neutral French oak, this wine is designated Napa Valley, but it’s made from dedicated grapes grown in the Crane Ranch Vineyard in the Oak Knoll District. The color is that true coral, what the French call “eye of the partridge,” and while I’ve never looked a partridge in the eye, I’ll take their word for it. Aromas of strawberries and peaches are highlighted by orange zest, a hint of dried thyme and rosemary and a touch of flint; a few minutes in the glass unfurl a note of tobacco-leaf earthiness. The structure feels incisively chiseled from limestone, and there’s a deep cut of bright acidity under a texture lent suppleness and clove-like spice by the brief exposure to wood; all of this supports tasty and juicy yet spare strawberry and red currant flavors. Alcohol content is 13.1 percent. Winemaker was Jeff Keene. Production was 417 cases. Excellent. About $25.

A sample for review.

In many parts of the United States of America, the season of Summer is not just gearing up but has arrived on our thresholds, hot and heavy. No better time, then, to unlimber a delicious rosé wine like Las Rocas de San Alejandro Rosé 2013, from the Calatayud appellation of the Zaragoza province in Aragon, northeastern Spain. Made from 100 percent garnacha grapes — known as grenache on the east side of the Pyrenees — this crowd-pleaser features a lovely topaz-salmon hue and enticing aromas of strawberries and red currants with a touch of spiced peaches, cloves and orange rind. It’s a little earthy on the palate, hinting at thyme and sage, limestone and flint, while expanding the influence of fresh and dried red fruit flavors and a note of stone-fruit, pomegranate and rose petal. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink through the end of this year with patio, pool-side and picnic fare. E.&J. Gallo acquired the San Alejandro cooperative in 2009. Very Good+. About $14, often discounted.

A sample for review. Image (one vintage behind) from thewinecountry.com.

Mother’s Day is Sunday, so right now I offer six selections of sparkling wine and Champagne to honor your Mom, toast her presence or memory and basically perform your duty as a child, which you will always be as long as either or both of your parents are among the living. No beverage is more festive that Champagne or sparkling wine — the latter designation for such products made outside of France’s Champagne region — and lord knows, your Mom deserves some festivity and honor after what she put up with all these years, n’est-ce pas? Prices range from just under $20 to over $60, so I hope there’s a bottle of bubbles here that will suit varying budgets. I include two sparkling wines from Italy and two from California, each of diverse spirit, and two Champagnes, also made in different styles; three of these products are rosés, making them even more celebratory. The sparkling wines were samples for review; I bought the Champagnes. Enjoy! And be good to your Mom!
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Carpenè Malvolti Extra Dry (nv), Prosecco Conigliano Valdobbiadene, Italy. 11% alc. 100% glera grapes. Pale pale gold color; green apples, almond skin and lemon curd, hint of lime peel; slightly sweet entry but dry from mid-palate back through the tingly, modestly spicy finish; quite clean, crisp and lively. Enticing by itself, or use in a Bellini with peach nectar. Very Good+. About $19.
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Sofia Blanc de Blancs 2012, Monterey County, California. 12% alc. Pinot blanc 74%, riesling 16%, muscat 10%; Pale gold color with brisk effervescence; jasmine and orange blossom, spiced pears; hints of lime peel and orange rind, roasted lemon; sprightly, engaging, just off-dry; touch of limestone minerality; backnote of biscuits and toasted hazelnuts. Very pleasant for casual sipping. Very Good+. About $19.
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Berlucchi Cuvée 61 Franciacorta Rosé (nv), Lombardy, Italy. 12.5% alc. Chardonnay 50%, pinot noir 50%. Lovely copper-salmon color, persistent stream of frothy bubbles; pop the cork and you smell strawberries from a foot away; add orange rind, almond skin and honeysuckle; pert, tart and sassy (my law firm), slightly sweet in the beginning but quickly transitions to bone dry; notes of lemon and lemon curd balanced by the acidity previously referred to and more than a hint of seashell minerality. Quite charming and beautifully structured. Excellent. About $35.
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Inman Family Brut Rosé 2012, Russian River Valley, California. 12% alcohol. 100% pinot noir. Pale pale pink color, almost virginal; a torrent of tiny bubbles; dried strawberries and raspberries, hints of brambles and lightly buttered cinnamon toast; a spine of bright acidity supporting a framework of scintillating limestone minerality; very dry, with spare red currant and stone-fruit flavors, hint of spiced pear, all elements woven with steely delicacy and elegance. Delightful, marvelous sparkling wine. Excellent. About $56.
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Henriot Souverain Brut (nv), Champagne, France. 12% alc. Chardonnay 40%, pinot noir 60%. Medium straw-gold color, wildly effervescent; biscuits and fresh bread, pears, lime peel and ginger, notes of limestone and chalk that take on increased resonance; vivacious acidity, almost glittering limestone minerality; lovely personality and verve, refreshing balance of savory and saline elements; irresistibly appealing. Excellent. I paid $62, but prices around the country go as low at $42.
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Paul Bara Grand Rosé Brut (nv), Champagne, France. 12% alc. Pinot noir 80%, chardonnay 20%, all Grand Cru vineyards. Pure topaz in hue; billions of tiny glinting bubbles; macerated strawberries, cloves, orange marmalade, hint of brioche, notes of chalk and flint; full-bodied, lots of presence and a powerful limestone element, yet wreathed with ethereal touches of dried red currants and rose petals, slightly biscuity; bone-dry with chiming acidity; tremendous class and breeding. Excellent. I paid about $69, but it can be found as cheaply as $45 if you look.
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