Looking for a wine to accompany a pasta dish that featured collard greens, ham and tomatoes, I twisted off the cap of the BEX Riesling 2014, made in the region of Germany designated Nahe, from the river of that name that flows northeast to the Rhine. This is a fairly simple and direct but exceedingly pleasing riesling whose touches of complexity give it a gratifying layered sense. The color is very pale straw-gold with faint green highlights; the bouquet offers subtle notes of jasmine and green apple, peach and yellow plum and hints of heather and honey. This is just off-dry, delivering a touch of sweetness on the entry but segueing to a dry, mineral-laden finish that feels like lavender-dusted steel. A whiff of gunflint provides intrigue; the texture is almost lush, but lithe and jazzed by bright acidity. 10 percent alcohol. Pretty damned charming. Very Good+. About $10, representing Real Value.

Imported by Purple Wine Co., Graton, Calif. A sample for review.

Though the estate was founded in 1811 by Sebastian Alois Prüm, records attest that the family had been growing grapes in the Mosel prum_luminance_lab_smsince 1156. Since 1971, the 40-acre property has been run by S.A. Prüm’s grandson Raimond and his daughter Saskia Andrea, who is positioned to take over complete operations. Today, I offer for your simple enjoyment the S.A. Prüm Luminance Riesling 2013, Mosel, a delightful wine that will not set you back on your heels in wonderment nor deal your wallet a death-blow. Made from 100 percent riesling grapes, all in stainless steel tanks, the wine exudes freshness and exuberance. The color is pale straw-gold; aromas of lightly spiced peaches and pears open to notes of lychee and heather, with just a hint of the grape’s petrol nature. The label says “dry,” though I would describe the wine as “mostly dry-ish,” primarily because of the gushing ripeness of its stone-fruit flavors, neatly held in check by a rather luminous limestone and slate minerality and scintillating acidity. The charming finish brings in touches of tangerine and jasmine. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drink through the Spring of 2016 as aperitif or with light fish and seafood dishes or even a veal roast. Very Good+. About $15, a Sweet Deal.

Imported by Palm Bay International, Boca Raton, Fla. A sample for review.

The Domaine Ostertag Vignoble d’E Riesling 2012, from Alsace, where France borders Germany, feels like a golden wine, burnished and RIESLING10glowing. The estate was founded in 1966 and went to full biodynamic practices in 1998. The color is a lovely mild gold hue; aromas of green apple, peaches and pears are highlighted by notes of orange rind and jasmine, with tantalizing hints of candied quince and ginger. It’s a very dry wine that scintillates with chiseled elements of limestone and flint, set ringing by bright acidity, even while it envelops the palate with juicy and spicy stone-fruit flavors. The whole package feels animated, polished and elegant. 12.5 percent alcohol. Try with charcuterie, pork chops with apples, trout in brown butter and capers, seafood risotto, through 2018 to 2020. Excellent. About $20.

Imported by Kermit Lynch, Berkeley, Calif. A sample for review. The label image is two vintages behind.

Napa Valley’s Chateau Montelena is best-known for its long-lived chardonnay and cabernet sauvignon wines. Riesling is something of a Rieslingsideline, but that doesn’t mean the approach is casual. The Chateau Montelena Riesling 2014, Potter Valley, is anything but off-hand. Potter Valley, in Medocino County, was approved as an American Viticultural Area in 1983; it’s the northernmost AVA in the vast North Coast region. This is a riesling of crystalline intensity and presence that begins with a pale gold hue and continues with arresting aromas of peach and lychee, spiced pear and lime peel, jasmine and lilac; there’s a snap of gunflint and a whiff of damp limestone. Chiming acidity cuts through a talc-like texture that whatever its burgeoning lushness feels spare, chiseled and elegant, presenting a thoughtful paradox of sensations to the palate. The wine is quite dry yet juicy with flavors of slightly dusty roasted lemon and candied kumquat; the finish brings in touches of limestone and spiced grapefruit, ending with a bracing saline note. 13.5 percent alcohol. We drank this wine last night with salmon dusted with fennel pollen rub and seared in a cast-iron skillet. Winemaker was Matt Crafton. Excellent. About $25.

A sample for review.

Yes, I’m offering another riesling as Wine of the Day, because, it seems to me and I have said before, that rieslings are perfect cattin rieslingwines for Autumn. Drink the Joseph Cattin Riesling 2013, Alsace, with roasted chicken or pork loin, lighter veal dishes, duck or rabbit terrine, charcuterie or seared or broiled trout, salmon or swordfish. This is a riesling — aged a minimum of four months in stainless steel and old oak tanks — of fine bones and gently chiseled structure, delicately modeled but strung along the energy and verve of bright acidity and scintillating limestone minerality. The color is very pale straw-gold; beguiling aromas of green apple, lemon, lime peel, lemon balm and grapefruit are twined with hints of verbena and jasmine, all expressed with eloquence but decided nuance. There’s more forward thrust on the palate, as the acid and steely-stony elements take charge and deliver a dynamic boost through a finish that’s spare and elegant without being austere. Flavors are dominated by lightly spiced lemon peel, quince and pear. A real beauty and a joy to drink. 12 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $14, a Raving Great Value.

Imported by T. Edward Wines, New York. A sample for review.

Eating at one of our favorite local fine dining restaurants Friday night, this wine, served as aperitif, was a revelation. The Schloss Gobelsburg “Gobelsburger” Riesling 2013, Kamptal, Austria, originates from an estate that can date its heritage back to 1171, when the schloss-gobelsburg-gobelsburger-riesling-kamptal-austria-10224971monks of Zwettl Monastery were granted the right to plant vines. In the 900 or so years that followed, the property changed hands many times, sometimes owned by the church, often by private owners, until 1996, when Schloss Gobelsburg and the whole estate were taken on a long-term lease by Willi Bründlmayer and Michael Moosbrugger. The center of the estate is the castle, actually a Renaissance palace updated during the Baroque period. The property consists of six vineyards encompassing 35 hectares spread over terraced hillsides of mica-schist and gneiss and hollows between hills where the soil is more loess and loam. These vineyards are treated separately as expressions of individual terroir and micro-climate. Fifty percent of the grapes cultivated are gruner veltliner, along with 25 percent riesling with the rest in red grapes, 8 percent zweigelt, 7 percent St. Laurent, and 5 percent each blauburgunder (pinot noir) and merlot.

The Schloss Gobelsburg “Gobelsburger” Riesling 2013 is perhaps the most radiantly pure and intense riesling I have tasted this year. The color is a beguiling pale straw-gold hue that practically shimmers in the glass; notes of lemon balm and lime peel, lemongrass and peach are seamlessly woven with a bare hint of lychee and touches of dusty limestone. These elements segue deftly onto the palate, where the wine’s mineral character burgeons into a simmering and scintillating — but never overwrought — attitude of stony rectitude that does not preclude an almost winsome citrus and stone-fruit nature decked with the subtlest quality of cloves and jasmine. The inextricable amalgam of flowers, fruit and talc-like minerality, energized by bright and piercing acidity, is delicious, provocative and unforgettable. NA% alcohol. Drink now through 2018 to 2020. Excellent. According to wine-searcher.com, the average national price is about $18, marking a Rare Unimpeachable Value.

A Terry Theise Selection, imported by Michael Skurnik Wines, Syosset, N.Y.

As with so many estates in European wine regions, Weingut Leitz has an interesting story. Though official records place the Leitz family in the winemaking industry of the Rheingau as far back as 1744, it wasn’t until the early 1960s that Josef Leitz rebuilt a leitzwinery damaged by Allied bombing near the end of World War II. His grandson, Johannes Leitz, took over the estate in 1985, turning the family’s interests primarily to the reisling grape. Starting with the 2.9 hectares the family owned — 7.16 acres — Johannes expanded the Leitz holdings to 43 hectares — about 106 acres — in 2014. Of that quantity, spread over a dozen individual vineyards, the area that produced the wine under review today, the Leitz Rudesheimer Berg Schlossberg Riesling Trocken 2013, Rheingau, measures exactly 1.17 hectares. The slope of Berg Schlossberg is 58 degrees, meaning that tending the vines and harvesting grapes can be extremely taxing, if not downright hazardous. The soil that supports (if that’s the word) this vineyard is a very hard and rocky red slate clay with quartzite mixed in, meaning that the vines have to struggle to root downward and find water and nutrients. The stress causes the vines to reduce the size and number of grapes, but those grapes exhibit great aromas, body and character. The Leitz Rudesheimer Berg Schlossberg Riesling Trocken 2013 offers a very pale gold hue and enticing scents of lemon balm, lime peel and peach that open to notes of quince and crystallized ginger; touches of cloves and talc add to the perfume. You must prepare yourself for what happens next, because this is a wine of palate-shattering acidity and scintillating chalk and limestone minerality; the words lively and crisp scarcely begin to describe the shimmering vibrancy that animates this exceptionally dry riesling. If that were all there was to it, we could take our puckery mouths and go elsewhere, but fortunately the wine also embodies touches of stone-fruit flavors, hints of baking spice and slightly candied flowers and an almost subliminal breeze of fresh seacoast salinity. The alcohol content is an eminently manageable 12.5 percent. Drink now through 2020 to 2025. We had this wine with swordfish seared in a cast-iron skillet in a coffee rub with urfa and maresh peppers. Excellent. About $20, an Amazing Value.

Imported by Schatzi Wines, Milan, N.Y. A sample for review.

Argyle’s Lone Star Vineyard in Willamette Valley’s Eola-Amity Hills AVA allots just under seven acres to the riesling grape, amounting to a bare two percent of the cultivation of the estate’s vineyards. The three blocks of riesling are divided into grapes that will undergo fermentation and aging in stainless steel, coming out with a smidgeon of residual sugar, and those that go into neutral French oak, coming out totally dry. That combination lends the Argyle Nuthouse Riesling 2013, Eola-Amity Hills, remarkable vibrancy and resonance, as well as real presence on the palate, though you would swear that the wine was weightless. The color is pale straw-gold; aromas of peach and spiced pear are wreathed with notes of lychee and petrol, quince and ginger, jasmine and honeysuckle; give the wine a few moments in the glass — serve it chilled and let it gradually and softly warm up — bring in hints of nectarine and lime peel. This is a richly golden, slightly honeyed reisling whose riveting acidity drives through a generous talc-like texture to allow the emergence of burgeoning limestone minerality; it displays a liveliness that goes beyond just crisp acidity to an essential dynamism that does not negate its delicate and elegant structure. 12 percent alcohol. Production was 1,300 cases. I happily drank a glass of this wine with a Parmesan cheese omelet with tomatoes and green olives. Now through 2019 to 2023. I consider this riesling among the best not only in Oregon but on the West Coast. Exceptional. About $30.

A sample for review.

Perhaps what you desire is a riesling that offers a touch of sweetness to balance the spice and mild heat of an Indian curry or pad thai or some similar dish from Southeast Asia that delivers multiple layers of flavor and temperature. I have a candidate for that office. It’s an inexpensive wine from Germany’s Rheinhessen region, the Georg Albrecht Schneider Niersteiner Paterberg Riesling Kabinett 2012, and it draws on the sweeter extension of the Kabinett purview, Kabinett being, to express the matter simply, the driest category of Germany’s classified wines. I don’t mean that the wine is cloying or dessert-like, only that its intense ripeness slides across the palate with a feeling of juicy, slightly roasted and brandied citrus and stone-fruit flavors steeped in green tea. The color is medium straw-gold; an enveloping softness of peach, pear, lychee and lime peel trembles from the glass, augmented by traces of candied orange rind and pink grapefruit, this subtle and nuanced panoply of delights anchored by a distinct sense of leafy, loamy earthiness; a few moments of swirling, sniffing and sipping bring out touches of quince and ginger and an echo of caramelized fennel. This completely pretty wine plunges across the taste-buds like liquid money, nothing profound but eminently attractive. 10 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2017 or ’18. Very Good+. About $15.

Imported by Winesellers Ltd, Niles, Illinois. A sample for review.

Sometimes all we require from a white wine is that it be clean, fresh, cold and tasty and that it goes down like a sea-breeze. Other times, however, we desire a white wine with more weight, with more character and savor, especially that latter quality. So today I offer 10 such white wines, produced from many wine regions and from a variety of grapes, a couple rather unusual. These are the white wines that stimulate the palate as well as refresh the spirit. As usual with these Weekend Wine Notes, I eschew a recital of technical detail, historical perspective and geographical data — all of which I adore — to present quick and incisive reviews designed to pique your interest and whet the old taste-buds. These wines, all rated Excellent except for one Exceptional, were either samples for review or were tasted at a wholesaler’s trade event. Enjoy, but with good sense and moderation.
Abbazia di Novacella Kerner 2013, Valle Isarco, Alto Adige, Italy. 13.5% alc. (You may add kerner to your list of obscure grapes.) Medium straw-gold hue with a faint green cast; roasted lemon, notes of quince and ginger, thyme and pine resin, touch of peach and a tantalizing hint of iris and lilac; slightly dusty and buoyant texture, focus on bright acidity and clean limestone minerality; spiced pear and yellow plum flavors with a saline edge. Now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $19, marking Good Value.
Alois Lageder Haberle Pinot Bianco 2013, Sudtirol, Alto Adige, Italy. 13% alc. Pale gold color; every aspect of lemon: lemon peel, lemon balm, lemon curd, with hints of green apple, peach and grapefruit, a whiff of almond blossom and rosemary; a savory and saline pinot blanc, trussed by limestone and flint minerality that devolves to a bracing finish featuring a bite of grapefruit bitterness. Now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $23.
Éric Chevalier Clos de la Butte 2013, Muscadet Côtes de Grand Lieu Sur Lie, Loire Valley, France. 11.5% alc. 100% melon de Bourgogne grapes. Pale straw-gold hue; unusually sizable and savory for Muscadet, with a lithe, sinewy structure based on fleet acidity and glittering limestone and flint minerality; pert and redolent with lemon and lime peel and a hint of almond blossom; notes of pear and apple; overall, glistening and glassy, delicate and finely-knit but with impressive heft. Now through 2016 to ’18. Excellent. About $16, a Real Bargain.
Clemens Busch Grauen Schiefer Riesling Trocken 2012, Mosel, Germany. 12% alc. Shimmering pale gold color; distinct aromas of lychee and rubber eraser, cloves, lime peel and grapefruit and a pert gingery quality, touch of jasmine; blazing acidity and scintillating limestone minerality; quite dry but with inherent citrus and stone-fruit ripeness; lovely lithe texture with elegant heft; a hint of loamy earthiness in the finish. A brilliant riesling. Now through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $30.
Etre Chardonnay 2012, Sonoma County. (Saxon Brown’s unoaked chardonnay.) 13.5% alc. 447 cases. Medium straw-gold color; ripe and spicy pineapple and grapefruit scents and flavors; an intriguing whiff of toasted oats; cloves and orange rind; all ensconced in lime peel and limestone minerality; bare hint of honeysuckle and mango; notes of spiced pear and roasted lemon; lively but not crunchy acidity; seductively lush texture but nothing opulent or obvious. Why would this need oak? Now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $28.
Grgich Hills Estate Fume Blanc 2013, Napa Valley. 14.1% alc. 100% sauvignon blanc grapes. Certified organic. Pale gold hue; lime peel and lemongrass, grapefruit and jasmine, mint and heather, a touch of guava, all seamlessly wreathed with a sort of breathless ease; lime and a note of peach in the mouth, a hint of thyme and timothy, lovely supple refined structure, a golden core of quince and ginger; finish is all flint, limestone and grapefruit rind. Now through 2017 or ’18. Exceptional. About $30.
Kennedy Shah Dubrut Vineyard Reserve Riesling 2012, Yakima Valley, Washington. 13.3% alc. Pale gold color; penetrating and provocative aromas of petrol, lychee, peach and spiced pear, top-notes of lemongrass and lime peel; crushed gravel and shale; very dry but luminously fruit-filled and animated by bright acidity and a vibrant limestone presence; notes of lime pith and grapefruit bitterness on the finish. A chiseled, multi-faceted riesling with plenty of appeal. Now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $25 .
André & Michel Quenard Les Abymes 2013, Savoie, France. 11% alc. 100% jacquere grapes (to be added to your roster of obscure grapes). Very pale gold color; cloves, cedar and mint, roasted lemon and spiced pear; vibrant acidity with a crisp edge, and more steel than limestone; clean and refreshing but with a woodsy aura and a touch of mossy earthiness on the finish. Drink through 2016. Excellent. About $20.
Saxon Brown Fighting Brothers Cuvee Semillon 2012, Sonoma County. 13.5% alc. 334 cases. Pale gold hue; beeswax, fig, quince and ginger; slightly leafy and herbal; candied orange peel, hint of mango; back-notes of spiced and brandied stone-fruit; wonderful sleek, silken texture, slides across the tongue like money; quite spicy and savory on the palate, with lip-smacking acidity and a wisp of limestone minerality. Pretty damned irresistible. Now through 2016 to ’18. Excellent. About $28.
Schloss Schonborn Riesling Trocken 2010, Rheingau, Germany. 11.5% alc. Crystalline and transparent in every sense, with marked purity and intensity; very pale gold color; winsome jasmine and honeysuckle, ripe and spicy pear, peach and lychee; hints of lemon balm and lemon curd; incisive acidity and decisive limestone and flint elements; slightly candied lime and grapefruit peel, cloves and ginger; the finish is all hewn limestone, a little austere and aloof. Now through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $18, representing Great Value.

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