Riesling


Let’s relax and think about the inevitable: Thanksgiving leftovers. We had eight people at our table last night but prepared enough food for at least 20. Not surprisingly, the refrigerator is crammed with plastic vessels containing an immense amount of leftover selections, though, curiously, not much pie. People tend to eat pie even when they’re aching with surfeit. All over the country, on Thanksgiving, Americans are saying, “Wow, I couldn’t eat another bite! Oh, well, sure, I guess I could manage some of that pecan pie.” Anyway, whether you’re making a hugelsandwich of turkey, dressing and cranberry sauce or just settling down to a plateful of food that bears a remarkable resemblance to what you ate yesterday, here’s a wine that makes a terrific accompaniment. The Famille Hugel Classic Riesling 2015, Alsace, from the winemaking family that goes back 13 generations in the region, was fashioned all in stainless steel to ensure its sense of freshness and immediate appeal. The color is pale gold with a faint green tone; enticing aromas of green apple and ripe peaches are wreathed with scents of lychee, jasmine and honeysuckle and a prominent element of petrol, or you could call it rubber eraser, in either case a typical note and always intriguing touch from the riesling grape. The wine is silky smooth but slightly chiseled on the palate, encompassing ripe and spicy and juicy stone-fruit flavors enlivened by fleet and lithe acidity and scintillating limestone minerality. The finish is clean, bright, spicy and floral and nicely faceted. A classic, all right, and a real crowd-pleaser. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018. Excellent. About $25.

Imported by Frederick Wildman & Sons, New York. A sample for review.

You won’t believe the price on today’s selection, and I mean that in the best way. I have been alsaceenjoying Alsace single-vineyard Grand Cru rieslings lately, and this example is one of the best. The Frédéric Mallo Vieilles Vignes Riesling Rosacker 2010, Alsace Grand Cru, offers a color of entrancing medium gold and arresting aromas of ripe peaches, mangoes and pears shot through with honeysuckle and the grape’s signature petrol element, all wrapped around notes of almond blossom and almond skin, cloves and dusty heather. Yep, it’s pretty damned heady stuff, all right. The entry is sweet and ripe, almost lush in its spiced peach and melon fanfare, but it slides across the palate going increasingly dry until reaching a finish of bright scintillating acidity and pure limestone and flint minerality. In fact, the wine displays quite a bit of tension in the poised equilibrium between sweetness and dryness, a tautness that provides energy and dynamism. From mid-palate back, it becomes more savory and saline, more chiseled and lithe. 13 percent alcohol. “Vieilles vignes,” in this case, means vines that are more than 50 years old. Drink through 2020 to ’24 with mildly spicy Asian fare or with a roasted pork tenderloin festooned with leeks and prunes or a roasted chicken stuffed with lemon and rosemary. Excellent. About $23, a Remarkable Value.

USA Wine Imports, New York. A sample for review.

I wrote about the 2012 version of today’s selection about two years ago, but now it’s the turn for the Pfeffingen Dry Riesling 2013, from Germany’s bucolic Pfalz region, which extends 53 miles in a 301 Labellong peninsular shape south from Rheinhessen to the French border. In 2012, a chilly wet Summer in Germany was succeeded by warmth in September and October, allowing grapes to ripen nicely and providing many excellent wines. The opposite case prevailed in 2013, when a mild Summer yielded to rain in September and October, the bane of growers and winemakers. The result in this case is a very dry riesling that focuses on acidity and mineral elements rather than the forwardness of succulent fruit. Still, the medium gold-hued Pfeffingen Dry Riesling 2013, the basic offering from this estate that traces its origin to 1622, delivers plenty of advantages, if not charm. Initial (and quite pretty) aromas of jasmine, heather and honeydew melon, peach and lychee, lime peel and lemongrass open to the rigorous nature of burgeoning limestone and flint minerality that extends all the way down through the wine’s framework and foundation. Bright scintillating acid leads to a fairly bracing damp stone, sea-salt and grapefruit-pith finish. 12.5 percent alcohol. An essential accompaniment to fresh oysters and grilled shrimp or mussels, though we drank a glass or two with salmon, marinated simply in olive oil and lemon juice, salt and pepper, and seared in the cast-iron skillet. Now through 2018 or ’19. Very Good+. About $16, a local purchase.

As far as white wines are concerned, Spring and Summer tend to be the domains of bright, light, delicate wines that go down easy as aperitifs while we’re sitting out on the porch or patio or lounging in a bosky dell on a frolicsome picnic. Nothing wrong with those scenarios at all. Now that the weather is in transition, however, when there’s a touch of chilly, rainy uncertainty in the air and our thoughts are sliding toward more substantial fare than cucumber and watercress sandwiches — no crusts, please! — the logical choice would be white wines with a bit more heft, flavor and savor. The 10 examples under review today provide those qualities in diverse ways, because they are, naturally, diverse wines. Grapes include sauvignon blanc, riesling, roussanne and marsanne, vermentino, verdicchio and trebbiano. Some of the wines saw no oak while others received extended barrel aging. Their points of origin range from various spots in Italy and several regions in California, from Alsace in France to Pfalz in Germany. Above all, and I cannot emphasize this note too strenuously, every one of these wines was a joy to drink, first because they are so different each to each, and second because in their eloquent variations they reflect integrity of intentions in the vineyard and the winery, an integrity dedicated to the expressiveness of a location and grape varieties. Each wine mentioned here made me feel as if I were sipping liquid gold.
Unless otherwise noted, these wines were samples for review.
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The pale gold Arrow&Branch Sauvignon Blanc 2015, Napa Valley, performs that gratifying task of balancing the utmost in a delicate, elegant character with a vivacious, appealing personality. Aromas of pea shoot, heather, cucumber and lime peel are infused with damp limestone and flint, roasted lemon and lemon balm and a hint of raspberry leaf. The wine is bright and crisp, dense but paradoxically ethereal, and it opens to touches of almond skin and pear skin, waxy white flowers and a hint of the wildly exotic and tropical. All of these exuberant elements are handily restrained by brisk acidity and the mild spicy/woodsy aura of a touch of French oak. 14.1 percent alcohol. A truly beautiful sauvignon blanc, made by Jennifer Williams, for consuming through 2018 or ’19. Exceptional. About $35.
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barmes
The color of the Domaine Barmès-Buecher “Hengst” Riesling Grand Cru 2012, Alsace, is a slightly brassy medium gold hue of intense purity; the bouquet unfurls multiple layers of nuance as Platonic ripeness invests aromas of peach and quince touched with hints of lychee, musk-melon and apricot nectar, yielding to apples, green tea and lemongrass and an intriguing, lingering note of petrol. The wine is moderately sweet at entry but segues to dryness as it flows across the palate, reaching a finish that feels profoundly minerally with elements of iodine-washed limestone and flint. Between those points, a lithe silky texture is emboldened by vibrant acidity, a strain of savory, woodsy spices and macerated stone-fruit flavors. 14 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2020 to ’24. Excellent. About $36.
Imported by Petit Pois/Sussex Wine Merchants, Moorestown, N.J.
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Hungarians are justly proud of their indigenous grape, furmint. Tasting through a few furmintexamples recently, I was impressed by the grape’s versatility and its capacity for making wines that are seemingly light-filled and weightless in affect yet layered in complexity of detail and dimension. The Béres Tokaji Furmint 2014, Szaraz, displays a light golden-yellow hue and subtle aromas of ripe lemons, apples and pears; a few moments in the glass unveil notes of straw, heather, thyme and peach. A particular sense of balance between the sweet ripeness of the stone-fruit flavors and the dry, bright acid and mineral structure creates an immensely satisfying effect, the entire package driving leisurely to a limestone and flint-packed finish. 13 percent alcohol. The sort of wine that makes you happy to drink. Now through 2018 or ’19. Winemaker was János Jarecsni. Excellent. About $19, representing Good Value.
Imported by New Wines of Hungary,
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What a beauty this is! The Weingut Eugen Müller Forster Mariengarten Riesling Kabinett, forster2013, Pfalz, is a wild, meadowy, golden, sleek and crystalline riesling whose very pale straw hue almost shimmers in the glass; notes of peaches, lime peel and lychee feel a little slate-y and loamy, though there’s nothing earth-bound about the wine’s delicacy and elegance. A few moments in the glass bring in hints of green apples and cloves, while a sweet entry retains a modest claim of a fairly dry, limestone-etched finish. 9.5 percent alcohol. Now through 2021 to ’23. Excellent. About $19, a local purchase and Real Value.
A Terry Theise Estate Selection, Skurnik Wines, New York.
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gallica
Rosemary Cakebread made only 180 cases of her Gallica Albarino 2015, Calaveras County, so you should call the winery right now and try to reserve a few bottles. The grapes derive from the Rorick Heritage Vineyard, located at about 2,000 feet elevation in the Sierra Foothills; the wine — including a touch of muscat blanc — aged nine months in stainless steel tanks and neutral French oak barrels. A pale yellow-gold hue presages aromas of yellow plums and pears, figs, acacia and heather that evolve to a slightly leafy, grassy quality. What a joyful, lively, expressive personality this wine offers; the texture is supple, suave and elegant, all elements defined by balance and seamlessness yet edging to wild, spicy, savory qualities in the chiseled finish. 14 percent alcohol. Now through 2019 or ’20. Excellent. About $36.
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The Garofoli “Podium” 2013, Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Classico Superiore, podiumincorporates no oak in its making and is all the better for it. Produced in Italy’s Marche region by a family that has been making wine since 1871, this 100 percent verdicchio offers a pure medium gold hue and ravishing aromas of tangerine and peach, jasmine and almond skin and — how else to say it? — rain on Spring flowers, yes, it’s that incredibly fresh and appealing. It’s also, somewhat paradoxically, quite dry and spare though warm, spicy and a bit earthy, enlivened by keen acidity and a scintillating quality of limestone and flint minerality. Again, it’s a wine that feels very satisfying to drink. 13 percent alcohol. Now through 2018 or ’19. Excellent. About $25.
Imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa Calif.
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My reaction on seeing that this white wine aged 22 months in new French oak barriques was a big “Uh-oh.” I mean, friends, that’s a whole heap of new wood influence. However, in the trebbianoMasciarelli Marina Cveti? Trebbiano Riserva 2013, Trebbiano d’Abruzzo, the eponymous winemaker manages to pull off a remarkable feat. The opening salvo is an attractive bright medium straw gold color; then come notes of candied tangerine and grapefruit peel, ginger and quince, cloves and a sort of light rain on dusty stones effect; after a few moments, the wine unfolds hints of lemon balm and roasted lemon, lilac and lavender. Yes, it’s pretty heady stuff. On the palate, this Trebbiano Riserva ’13 feels vital and vibrant, rich and succulent with spiced and slightly baked peach and apricot flavors, though its opulence is held in check by chiming acidity and a resonant chiseled limestone element. You feel the oak in the wine’s framework and foundation but as a supporting factor that lends shape and suppleness rather than as a dominant element. 14 percent alcohol. Quite an achievement for drinking through 2023 to ’25. Excellent. About $43.
Imported by Masciarelli Wine Co., Weymouth, Mass.
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E&J Gallo acquired distribution rights to the venerable family-operated Soave producer Pieropan in March 2015, adding it to Allegrini and Poggio al Tesoro in the company’s Luxury Wine Group. The Pieropan Soave Classico 2015 is a blend of 85 percent garganega grapes and 15 percent trebbiano di Soave, derived from certified organic vineyards. The wine saw no oak but fermented and matured in glass-line cement tanks. The color is pale yellow-gold; aromas of roasted lemons and spiced pears are bright, clean and fresh and permeated by notes of almond blossom, acacia and grapefruit rind. The wine delivers amazing heft and presence for the price category, yet it remains deft and light on its feet; brilliant acidity keeps it lively on the palate, while a saline limestone quality lends depth and poignancy. 12 percent alcohol. Drink through 2018. Excellent. About $20, representing Great Value.
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Steve Hall made the Troon Vineyard Longue Carabine 2014, Applegate Valley, Southern troon-carabineOregon, by co-fermenting different lots of marsanne, viognier, vermentino and roussanne grapes, with slim dollops apparently (depending on what infomation you read) of sauvignon blanc and early muscat. The final proportions of the blend are 38.5 percent vermentino, 33 percent viognier, 27 marsanne and 1.5 roussanne; information as to oak aging, type of oak and length of time is not available. The wine is seriously complex and intriguing. The color is pale straw-gold; the whole effect is spare, high-toned and elegant, with hints of baked peaches and pears, hints of grapefruit, fennel and celery leaf, bee’s-wax, lanolin and flowering heather, all robed in a tremendous acid-and-mineral structure that creates a sense of vital dynamism. above depths of dusty, flinty loam. These elements take time to blossom, the wine being fairly reticent at first. 12.5 percent alcohol. Production was 163 cases. Now through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $34.
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The Two Shepherds Catie’s Corner Viognier 2014, Russian River Valley, offers a 2-shepspale straw-gold hue and beguiling, compelling aromas of jasmine and gardenia, peach and pear, bee’s-wax and lanolin over hints of lime peel and grapefruit pith; the wine sees only neutral French oak, a device that lends shape and suppleness to the structure without incurring undue wood influence. Riveting acidity and a remarkable shapeliness and heft in the texture give the wine tremendous personality and eloquence. Time in the glass bring in notes of heather and thyme, roasted lemon and sage, lemon balm and sour melon, all elements engaged in a remarkably poised feat of crystalline tension and resolution. 13.3 percent alcohol. Brilliant wine-making from William Allen. Now through 2018 or ’19. Production was 75 cases, so go online now. Exceptional. About $26.
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My Wine of the Day back on November 19, 2015, was the Chateau Montelena Riesling 2014, Potter Valley. That wine went on to be included in my list of “50 Great Wines of 2015.” Why would I montelena rieslingfeature, only nine months later, the version of this riesling from 2015? Because it illustrates how perfectly consistent and well-made the wine is; it certainly can claim its place among the best rieslings produced in California. The Chateau Montelena Riesling 2015, Potter Valley, which aged six months in a combination of stainless steel tanks and French oak barrels, exhibits a pale but radiant gold hue and immediately appealing notes of lemon balm, quince and ginger, with hints of lychee, peach and pear and an upper register of lilac and jasmine. On the palate, the wine is lively and vivid, offering an extraordinary texture and body like dusty graphite, talc and loam cut by riveting acidity and a bright limestone element. The balance here, the poise among all elements is exciting, racy, a little risky, yet it also delivers a pleasing and paradoxical softness, a cloud-like suspension of ripe citrus and stone-fruit flavors. 13 percent alcohol. We drank this bottle last night with dinner: swordfish marinated in lemon juice and olive oil, maresh and urfa peppers and smoked hot paprika; a mash of Yukon Gold potatoes and one sweet potato; and green peas cooked in riesling and mint, all pretty damned perfect. Drink now through 2018 or ’19. excellent. About $25.

A sample for review.

Frankland Estate was established in 1988 in Western Australia by Barrie Smith and Judi Cullam, FE-Brand-1-RGB3who are now assisted by their daughter Elizabeth Smith and son Hunter Smith and a small team of workers. The aim is to produce wines that reflect location, soil and vineyard environment rather than the technical prowess of a winemaker. The winery makes admirable chardonnay and shiraz-based wines, but the rieslings are particularly compelling for their purity, concentration and intensity as well as their immense pleasurable qualities. The wines have been certified organic since 2010. Today, we look at the estate’s three top rieslings, all designated as single-vineyard, from the 2014 vintage.

Imported by Quintessential, Napa, Calif. Samples for review.
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The Frankland Estate Netley Road Vineyard Riesling 2014, Frankland River, ferments and ages in a combination of stainless steel tanks and neutral oak barrels. It offers a very pale gold hue with a faint green tinge and displays a riveting petrol element and astounding limestone minerality, along with staggering scintillating acidity. Yes, four “ing” adjectives! Fortunately, the austerity is leavened somewhat by notes of cloves and acacia, lychee and apricot, but this is primarily a riesling defined by its structural qualities. 13 percent alcohol. Try from 2018 or ’19 through 2028 to ’30. Production was 500 cases. Excellent potential. About $35.
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As with its cousin mentioned just above, the Frankland Estate Isolation Ridge Riesling 2014, Frankland River, ferments and matures in stainless steel tanks and neutral oak barrels. The color is pale but not as pale as the Netley Road; pert aromas and flavors of lychee and petrol, lime peel and peach subtly open to notes of cloves and white pepper, all riven by a decisive limestone and gunflint element that lends the whole package a chiseled, glacial character. It almost goes without saying here that the acidity is clean, bright and vibrant, and that the wine from start to finish is spare, high-toned and elegant. 11.7 percent alcohol. Drink through 2024 to ’28. Production was 1,200 cases. Excellent. About $40.
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The color of the Frankland Estate Poison Hill Vineyard Riesling 2014, Frankland River, is pale gold, but what captures your attention are the aromas of lychee and peaches when you pour some into your glass; it’s that penetrating and alluring. These aspects are followed by hints of papaya, tangerine and nectarine, with the characteristic riesling note that here leans more toward rubber eraser than petrol, wreathed with charming elements of jasmine and lilac. Limestone and flint minerality make a powerful entrance, though this wine is a bit warmer and more approachable than its stablemates mentioned above; the texture is more delicate, still lithe and energetic and propelled by an acute limestone nature. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2022 to ’24. Production was 400 cases. Excellent. About $35.
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The Reichsgraf von Kesselstatt Josephshöff Riesling Kabinett 2012 derives from one of the german 2smallest crops in Germany’s Mosel region in 30 years. A small crop, however, though inevitably leading to smaller production, can also imply more concentration and intensity, certainly true of this shimmering, glistening wine. The color is moderate pale gold; scents of white pepper, mango, spiced pear and baked apple unfold to whiffs of fennel, quince and ginger, layered with notes of damp limestone and flint. It’s a completely lovely and complex wine, silky and supple, slightly creamy, as befits the ripeness of its fruit, yet lithe and dynamic, in sync with its bright acidity and scintillating limestone minerality. Above all, it’s a golden wine, faintly honeyed despite its dry character, replete with the aura of yellow fruit and meadow flowers, and finishing with exotic spice and a fillip of pink grapefruit. 11 percent alcohol. Drink this exquisite riesling, which should darken and burnish with age, through 2020 to 2022, properly stored. Think pork tenderloin, roasted veal shoulder, trout amandine, grilled sausages. The estate dates to 1349. Excellent. About $23.

Imported by Valckenberg international, Tulsa, Okla. A sample for review.

Many German wines have names that are a real mouthful of terms and umlauts, so here goes. Our schlossjohannisberg_rieslinggrunlack_labelfront_loreswine today is the Fürst von Metterich Schloss Johannisberg Grünlack Spätlese Riesling 2012, from the Rheingau region.

Schloss Johannisberg is an ancient estate that occupies a magnificent site on a broad hill that slopes in a southerly direction down to the Rhine. Grapes have been grown there apparently since the 12th Century, during monastic days. It has been an all-riesling property since 1720 and was one of the first, if not the first, in Germany to make a late harvest sweet wine from grapes affected by botrytis cinerea, the “noble rot.” In 1816, Schloss Johannisberg was given to Prince von Metternich by the Austrian Franz I for services at the Congress of Vienna — which redrew the map of Europe after Napoleon’s final defeat at Waterloo — and while the Metternich name still appears on the estate’s labels, it was acquired in 1974 by the giant conglomerate Dr. August Oetker KG, manufacturer of baking soda, dessert mixes, frozen pizzas and yogurt and owner of breweries, sparkling wine facilities, hotels and so on.

The color is shimmering pale straw-gold; aromas of peaches and pears, lime peel, jasmine and honeysuckle are highlighted by notes of cloves and a snap of gunflint. It’s almost needless to say that this is very attractive, even seductive stuff. Made 70 percent in stainless steel and 30 percent in oak, the wine is clean and bright, with a subtle graphite influence in the depths and a fine vibrant line of acidity for animation. This is, yes, a fairly sweet version of the Spätlese category, with flavors of ripe and slightly honeyed peaches and apricots, but it’s also beautifully balanced and even a bit dry around the circumference and through the golden finish. 7.5 percent alcohol. A lovely wine for pairing with moderately spicy Thai or Vietnamese fare, with, say, a pork roast cooked with apples, or with simple desserts. Winemaker was Christian Witte. Excellent. About $30.

MW Imports, White Plains, N.Y. A sample for review.

Inexorably we drift from Spring into Summer, so in honor of this transitional state I offer a dozen savory, zesty white wines. The grapes range from the familiar — sauvignon blanc, riesling — to the unfamiliar and exotic — grillo, gouveio, while the geography takes us all over the place. Prices rise from about $12 to $28, giving space for some real bargains and great values. As usual in these Weekend Wine Notes, I eschew all technical, historical, geological and personal data — as interesting as those items may be — for the sake of quick and incisive reviews, ripped, as it were, from the pages of my notebook, and designed to pique your interest and whet your palate. Unless otherwise noted, these wines were samples for review. Enjoy!
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Alois Lagerder Haberle Pinot Blanc 2013, Südtirol Alto Adige, Italy. 13% alc. Production was 1,125 cases. Very pale straw hue; ripe, spice, macerated and lightly roasted stone-fruit with a halo of white flowers; notes of dried thyme and fennel; lithe and supple texture, offering vivid acid cut and limestone dimensions of structure; very dry but juicy with peach, pear and yellow plum flavors; real personality and character. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $23.
Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif.
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erste-neue
Erste + Neue Pinot Grigio 2015, Alto-Adige. 14% alc. Pale gold color; very appealing, with notes of green apple, pear and lemon balm, heather and meadow grass; heady and floral; lovely silken texture; quite dry, with pert acidity and shimmering limestone minerality; nothing complicated, just altogether irresistible. Now through 2017. Very Good+. About $16.
Imported by T Edward Wines, New York.
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assobio
Esporao Assobio 2014, Douro, Portugal. 13% alc. 40% viosinho grapes, 30% gouveio, 20% verdelho, 10% arinto. Pale straw color; pear and acacia, heather and thyme; a bracing aura of sea-breeze and salt-marsh; very dry, with pert acidity, layers of damp flint and shale minerality; an exotic spicy-herbal flare; lean and supple. Now through 2017 to ’18. Very Good+. About $14, marking Great Value.
Imported by Aidil Wines, New York.
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semillon
Esporao Private Selection Semillon 2013, Alentejano, Portugal. 14% alc. Medium gold hue; elevating aromas of quince and ginger, spiced pear, lemon oil and orange rind; slightly honeyed in aspect but quite dry and spare; a fragile infusion of tropical fruit and flowers with a hint of fig; lovely silky texture, moderately lush but honed by limestone. Now through 2018. Excellent. About $28.
Impoted by Aidil Wines, New York.
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Gewurz
Lazy Creek Vineyards Gewurztraminer 2014, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County. 14.2% alc. Production was, alas, only 65 cases. Pale straw color; classic notes of lychee, pear, jasmine and rubber eraser, with hints of cloves and ginger; lithe texture, with crystalline clarity, acidity and limestone drive, great vibrancy and appeal; the limestone-flint minerality builds through the dynamic finish; grapefruit finish with a touch of bracing bitterness. A terrific example of the grape. Now through 2019 or ’20. Excellent. About $22.
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Matetic EQ Coastal Sauvignon Blanc 2015, Casablanca Valley, Chile. 13.5% alc. Pale straw color; Matetic EQ Coastal SB 14 Ftgrapefruit, lilac, greengage; celery seed and fennel with back-notes of lime peel, quince and ginger; crisp and lively, with riveting acidity and a plangent limestone element; a lithe, almost sinewy texture with depths of fruit, spice and minerality bolstering a scintillating, transparent finish. Now through 2017. Excellent. About $20.
Imported by Quintessential, Napa Calif. The label image is one vintage behind.
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Chateau Puyanché Franc 2014, Cote de Bordeaux Blanc. 75% sauvignon blanc, 25% semillon. Pale straw-gold hue; assertive notes of dill and celery seed, caraway and lime peel, with pink grapefruit and ethereal back-notes of melon and apple skin; just a lovely wine in every way: slightly powdery texture, stone-fruit and citrus scents and flavors, bright acidity and limestone minerality; sleek, chiseled finish. Now through 2018. Excellent. About $15, a Real Bargain.
Imported by Twins America. Tasted at a wholesaler’s trade event.
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plotzner
St. Pauls Plotzner Weissburgunder 2015, Südtirol Alto Adige. 13.5% alc. Very pale straw color; spice pear and roasted lemon, hay and autumn meadows, chalk and flint; a little earthy, as if its toes were still in the vineyard; clean and incisive acidity and chiseled limestone minerality. An exhilarating pinot blanc for drinking through 2019 to ’20. Excellent. About $20.
Importer N/A.
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Tascate Buonora 2014, Sicilia. 12% alc. 100% carricante grapes. Pale straw-gold hue; a rich, Stampagolden wine, with spiced pears and yellow plums, sage and thyme, green tea, quince and acacia; scintillating limestone and flint minerality; sea-salt and meadow; spicy and savory. A great deal of charm. Now through 2017. Very Good+. About $20.
Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif.
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blanc
Two Shepherds Pastoral Blanc 2013, Russian River Valley. 12.9% alc. Roussanne 50%, marsanne 25%, viognier 13%, grenache blanc 6%, grenache gris 6%. Production was 100 cases. Pale straw-gold hue; peach, pear and quince, bee’s-wax, dried thyme and sage; apple skin and pear nectar; lilac and acacia; yellow plums and a bare hint of mango; all these elements inextricably encompassed in a package that feels irrevocably vital, vibrant, real, bound to the earth yet ethereally delicate and delicious. An extraordinary wine. Exceptional. About $30.
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grillo
Vento di Mare Grillo 2014, Terre Siciliana IGT. 12.5% alc. Made from organic grillo grapes. Pale straw-gold hue; savory and saline, with yellow plum and roasted lemon scents and flavors, notes of heather, dried thyme and sea-grass, clean-cut acidity and limestone minerality and a chalk-flinty element that increases through the herb-and-spice laden finish. Drink up. Very Good+. About $12, an Amazing Bargain.
Imported by Middleton Family Wines, Shandon, Calif.
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wakefield riesling
Wakefield Riesling 2015, Clare Valley, Australia. 12% alc. Pale straw gold color; peach and pear, lychee and jasmine, with a hint of zesty grapefruit and its pith; very dry, with a burgeoning limestone and chalk element, all wrapped in delightful vitality. Now through 2017. Very Good+. About $17.
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You know how writers and reviewers sometimes specify the kind of apple and the species of pear that they detect in a wine’s aromas? My usual reaction to that sort of detail is, sotto voce, riesling“Yeah, right, sure.” I swear, though, that my first reaction to the Robert Eymael Mönchhof Riesling 2014, from Germany’s Mosel region, was, “Golden Delicious apples and Anjou pears.” Then slightly baked and roasted Golden Delicious apples and Anjou pears, with hints of lychee and peach, cloves and jasmine. The wine — offering a pale straw-gold hue — is fresh, clean and appealing, just barely sweet, more ripe with stone-fruit goodness than overtly sweet, yet displaying a touch of honeyed quince and ginger in the background. From mid-palate back, the crystalline acidity kicks in, as well as a scintillating element of flinty minerality, keeping the wine on a tasty and even keel. It would take a heart of stone not to find this riesling absolutely delightful. 9.5 percent alcohol. The estate goes back to 1171, with Cistercian monks, but the Aymael family acquired it in 1804, purchased from Napoleon. Robert Eymael is the sixth generation of the family to run the property. The wines are produced 70 percent in stainless steel tanks, 30 percent in large, old oak casks. Drink as a charming aperitif or with slightly spicy Asian cuisine, pork roast with apples, wiener schnitzel or charcuterie. Excellent. About $18, a local purchase; prices around the country start as low as $12 and go up to $20.

Rudi Wiest Selections, Carlsbad, Calif.

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