Prosecco


There’s Prosecco, and then there’s the — don’t try to say this all in one breath — Maschio dei Cavalieri Rive di Colbertaldo 2014, cavalieriValdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore, made from 100 percent glera grapes, though Italian wine regulations allow for up to 15 percent other grapes in a blend. It is not fashioned in the traditional Champagne method of second fermentation in the bottle, most Proseccos being made in the Charmat process of second fermentation in tank. Maschio dei Cavalieri tells us, however, that they accomplish the alcoholic and carbon dioxide fermentation simultaneously. OK. The Maschio dei Cavalieri Rive di Colbertaldo 2014 displays a pale straw yellow hue and a fervent rush of refined bubbles; this is a fresh and clean sparkling wine, offering gentle aromas of jasmine, green apple and pear, lime and lemongrass, smoke and steel. It’s crisp and lively on the palate, bringing in flavors of roasted lemon and melon, while at the core a cloud-like tenderness of texture prevails. Quite dry and more invigorating as the moments pass, this sparkling wine concludes with a fairly austere flinty finish. 11.5 percent alcohol. While the 2014 is now two years old, I recommend it for the sense of burnish and nuance that it reveals; drink through 2017. Excellent. About $20, representing Great Value.

Imported by Cru Artisan Wines, Old Brookville, N.Y., a division of Banfi Vintners. A sample for review.

Here’s a refreshing way to end the week or start it, depending on your point of view of Sunday’s boscofunction. The Bosco di Gica Brut, Valdobbiandene Prosecco Superiore, from the almost century-old Adriano Adami estate, adds some three to five percent chardonnay to its regulation glera grape, the one we used to call the prosecco grape but no longer. (How often in the dim past did I write “Prosecco is the name of the grape and the product”?) The grapes were grown on steep terraced hillsides of fairly shallow soil, the vineyards generally facing south; this is north of Venice. Prosecco is made, of course, not in the “Champagne method” of second fermentation in the bottle but in the Charmat process in which the second fermentation that produces the bubbles, occurs in steel pressure tanks. Whatever the method, the Bosco di Gica Brut is indeed a superior Prosecco, offering a very pale gold hue and a steady stream of glinting bubbles that’s more a persistent fizz than a propulsive froth; still, it’s quite pretty. Aromas of apples and pears, acacia and almond blossom develop hints of lime peel and almond skin; on the palate, this sparkler is delicate, pert and lively, a tickle for the tongue, made intriguing by its briny seashell minerality and pleasing for its deft balance and integration. 11 percent alcohol. Drink up and enjoy. Excellent. About $18.

Imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif. A sample for review.

Tenuta Filodora is a 37-acre vineyard located in the town of Miane, in the heart of the Prosecco DOCG area, about halfway between Valdobiaddene and Conegliano. It’s from this vineyard that filodoraTommasi, a stalwart of the Veneto region since 1902, derives the glera grapes for its Prosecco. However, because the wine is bottled outside the DOCG region, it is entitled only to a DOC classification. Not to worry! The Tommasi Filodora Prosecco is one of the best around. The color is the palest of pale gold hues, animated by a torrent of upward-surging tiny platinum bubbles. At first, this sparkling wine is all smoke and steel, and then it opens to glimmers of green apple and peach, hints of roasted lemon and baked pear, a touch of acacia. Bright acidity (and the persistent effervescence) keep it lively and dry on the palate, where it partakes of a seriously serious aura of flint and limestone minerality, all hurtling toward a finish pert with grapefruit rind and almond skin. 11.5 percent alcohol. Totally charming. Excellent. About $18.

Imported by Vintus LLC, Pleasantville N.Y. A sample for review.

Bisol_CredeValdobbiadeneProseccoSuperioreDOCG_bottleThumb
The Bisol Crede Brut is consistently one of the best Prosecco sparkling wines to come from that region in the Veneto. The designation is Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore, the hillside location — Valdobbiadene — being one of the prime vineyard areas for the glera grape. This is a blend of 85 percent glera, 10 percent pinot bianco and five percent verdiso grapes. It was made in the Charmat or autoclave method of second fermentation induced in stainless steel tanks. The vintage — 2014 — is indicated in small type on the back label. The color is very pale gold, animated by a whirling swarm of tiny glinting bubbles. This sparkling wine is all smoke and steel, green apples and pears, with notes of acacia and heather and a snap of flint. It’s very dry, offering a lithe limestone-flecked structure that chimes with bright acidity and a finish that’s vibrant with sea-shell minerality and salinity. 11.5 percent alcohol. Tasty and elegant together. Excellent. About $25.

Vias Imports, New York. A sample for review.