Pinot noir


Valençay, a small region of the Loire Valley, received AOC status in 2003. Located on the banks of the Cher river, a tributary of the Loire, and hanging, as it were, from the southeast edge of the large Touraine appellation, Valençay is unusual for two features. It was the first AOC in France designated for two products, wine and cheese — the latter a distinctive goat’s-milk cheese dusted with charcoal and produced in the form of a small truncated pyramid. And, second, the grapes allowed to be grown and blended seem unique. An example of the second element is our Wine of the Day, No. 55, the Jean-François Roy Valençay Rosé 2014, a blend of 60 percent pinot noir, 30 percent gamay and 10 percent malbec, or côt as the grape is known in the Loire Valley, where cabernet franc is the dominant red grape. Nowhere else in France would you see such a blend, at least not one that was permitted an AOC label. The Burgundian purists are shuddering — at least those who don’t surreptitiously add a few drops of Côtes du Rhône to their pinot noir to bolster color and body. Anyway, the color of the Jean-François Roy Valençay Rosé 2014 is a very pale copper-salmon hue; pull out the cork and be greeted by a burst of orange zest and orange blossom, with hints of strawberries and raspberries and touches of pomegranate, dried red currants and damp stones. This is a subtle and charming rosé, more spare than ripe in its feeling of slightly dried red fruit flavors, and taut with bright acidity and limestone minerality, yet lovely too its modestly lush texture. 12 percent alcohol. Serve as an aperitif or with picnic fare. Very Good+. About $16, a local purchase.

A Steven Berardi Selection for Martinicus Wines, Beverly Hills, Fla.

A sort of milestone, I suppose, the 50th post in a series, and on this momentous occasion I offer for your delectation and edification the Amici Cellars Pinot Noir 2013, from Sonoma County’s Russian River Valley AVA, a trove of fine pinot noir and chardonnay if they’re not messed about with excessively in the winery. This one was not. Winemaker for these friends is Joel Aiken, who spend almost 30 years as winemaker for Beaulieu Vineyards and now has his own brand as well as making the wines for Amici. The Amici Pinot Noir 2013 has the deft touch of a veteran all over it. The wine, which is “cellared” rather than “produced,” derives from a number of vineyards in Russian River Valley — in other words, very simply put, it’s not an estate wine — and aged 12 months in French oak, 40 percent new barrels. The color is medium ruby shading to a transparent magenta rim; an enticing bouquet of black and red cherries and raspberries is suffused with subtle notes of cloves and sandalwood, blueberries and rhubarb and a tantalizing hint of cocoa powder. This pinot noir is super satiny and supple on the palate, mixing ripe, spicy and moderately juicy black and red berry flavors with undertones of loam, briers and brambles and a touch of heather. While moving through the mouth with sensual allure, this pinot noir is neither opulent or obvious, letting its energy — propelled by brisk acidity and slightly dusty tannins — dictate a more delicate, elegant and nuanced approach. 14.2 percent alcohol. Production was 1,650 cases. Drink now through 2018 to 2020 with a roasted chicken, seared magret of duck or a veal chop grilled with rosemary. Excellent. About $35.

A sample for review.

Way back on July 11, as Wine of the Day, No. 29, the Foursight Wines Charles Vineyard Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County, was the topic of concern. Today, I want to look at a unique product issuing from the same winery — where Joe Webb is winemaker — the Foursight Charles Vineyard Unoaked Pinot Noir 2013, Anderson Valley, a red wine made entirely in stainless steel tanks; not a smidgeon of oak affects the impression of the grape’s purity and intensity. The color, a deep ruby-purple shading to magenta at the rim, will remind My Readers of Beaujolais-Villages or even a cru like Fleurie of Julienas, and indeed this wine offers some of the complicated fresh/earthy/funky/fruity character of the best examples of those genres. The ripeness and generosity of the ripe red and black currants and red and black cherries are unassailable, though that fruity aspect is permeated by notes of leather and loam, oolong tea and some dark rooty elixir; a few moments in the glass bring in tantalizing hints of raspberry (a little raspy), rose hips, dried fruit and potpourri. Scintillating acidity makes for a lively drink, while a background of graphite minerality and dusty yet silky tannins, from a portion of whole clusters, provides foundation and framing for structure. A lovely wine with a serious edge, not profound but with lots of appealing personality. 14.1 percent alcohol. Now through 2016 or ’17. Production was 125 cases. Excellent. About $25 and Worth a Search.

A sample for review.

The primary sparkling wines that issue from Schramsberg Vineyards are vintage-dated, I’ve just been tasting the releases from 2012. The venerable winery, founded in 1965, also offers a non-vintage sparkler called Mirabelle, a product that has steadily improved — and increased in price — over the years. The current version of the Scramsberg Mirabelle Brut is a blend of 83 percent 2011 and 17 percent reserve wines held back from previous years. The designation is California, because grapes are drawn from these counties: Sonoma, Monterey, Mendocino, Santa Barbara and Marin. It’s a combination of 52 percent chardonnay and 48 percent pinot noir. The color is medium straw-yellow, enlivened by a potent upward stream of finely honed bubbles; aromas of green apples and lime peel open to notes of quince and ginger, with hints of lightly buttered cinnamon toast and limestone; the overall effect is savory and saline, like heather, marsh grass and seashells. Squinching acidity contributes crispness and animation to this sparkling wine, which delivers flavors of roasted lemon, toasted hazelnuts and a touch of toffee; it’s quite dry and seems not to attempt the ethereal and elegant realms that Schramsberg’s vintage sparklers do; instead, this is about substance, moment and momentum on the palate, with a lively and dense character. Alcohol content is 12.6 percent. Drink with a variety of flavorful appetizers, especially revolving around grilled shrimp, smoked salmon and crab. Excellent. About $27.

A sample for review.

A blend of grapes from four vineyards and a plethora of classic clones, the Benovia Pinot Noir 2013, Russian River Valley, offers a medium ruby color that shades into ethereal transparency at the rim; first come smoke and loam, then an earthy briery-brambly quality, followed by touches of black cherry, cranberry and a hint of pomegranate seemingly macerated with cloves and sandalwood, mulberry and rhubarb; yes, that’s quite a sumptuous panoply of effects. The wine is dense and super satiny on the palate, a pretty wine with pockets of darkness and something sleek, polished and intricate that reminded me of the line from Keats’ sonnet “To Sleep”: “turn the key deftly in the oiled wards.” Not that this pinot noir feels too carefully made — winemaker is Mike Sullivan — because it concludes on a highly individual and feral note of wild berries, new leather, fresh linen and finely-milled tannins, all propelled by bright acidity. Alcohol content is 14.1 percent. Drink now through 2018 to 2020 with roasted chicken, seared duck breast, lamb or veal chops. Excellent. About $38.

A sample for review.

Nobilo Wines qualifies as a pioneer winery in New Zealand, being founded in 1943, a mere blip in time for many estates in Europe. Better late than never, right! Anyway, the Icon label is Nobilo’s top designation, and today I look at the Nobilo Icon Pinot Noir 2013, Marlborough. The wine is a blend of grapes from three estate vineyards lying at different altitudes on different types of soil. It aged 10 months in French oak, 20 percent new barrels. The color is dark ruby in the center shading to a transparent rim; very attractive aromas of raspberries, cloves, rhubarb and smoked black cherries are twined with fairly profound notes of loam and underbrush, while a few minutes in the glass deepen the spicy element. This pinot noir is quite dry, edging toward finely-sifted dusty tannins, but it retains a feeling of juicy ripeness around the circumference, as well as offering a supple and satiny texture. It trades principally, however, on the earthy aspect, as it gathers its forces of mushrooms, briers and brambles, a touch of some rooty tea and dollops of graphite for a cool, slightly chiseled finish. 13 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018 to 2020 with grilled lamb or veal chops. In some degree, this pinot noir lacks the balancing effect of grace and elegance so essential to the grape, but it offers an interesting and satisfying exploration of the dark side. Excellent. About $20, representing Good Value.

Constellation Imports, Gonzales, Calif. A sample for review.

Oh, what the hell, let’s have a bottle of sparkling wine! Surely you can come up with something to celebrate. Or not. I would just as soon drink Champagne and other forms of sparkling wine for any purpose, any whim, any occasion, even if it’s merely standing around the kitchen preparing dinner. For our category of sparkling wine today, then, I choose the Domaine Chandon Étoile Brut Rosé, a non-vintage blend of primarily chardonnay and pinot meunier grapes with a dollop of pinot noir, the sources being the Carneros regions in Sonoma County (58 percent) and Napa County (42 percent). The wine rested sur lie — on the residue of dead yeast cells — five years in the bottle after the second fermentation that produces the essential effervescence. The color is an entrancing medium copper-salmon hue riven by an upward-surging torrent of glinting silver bubbles. Notes of blood orange, strawberry and raspberry unfold to hints of lime peel, quince and ginger, with, always in the background, touches of limestone, lightly buttered cinnamon toast and orange marmalade; think of the tension and balance between the subtle sweet fruitiness and bitterness of the latter. On the palate, this sparkling wine works with delicacy and elegance to plow a furrow of juicy red berry and citrus flavors — with a bit of pomegranate — into a foundation of slate and limestone minerality and lively acidity for a crisp, dynamic texture and long spicy finish. 13 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $50.

A sample for review.

Like a poem by Walt Whitman or the notion of democracy itself, the best wines embrace contradiction and resolve paradoxical elements into a sense of palatable completeness. An excellent or exceptional wine may be both elegant and propulsive, chiseled and generous, rich and warm yet cool and aloof, glamorous and rigorous altogether. The best scenario occurs when such a wine conveys the panoply of its character with subtlety and nuance. Must all wines exhibit such a congeries of effects, depth and dimension? Certainly and thankfully not. Sometimes — quite often actually — all we require is a decent quaff, a well-made but uncomplicated wine, to accompany a simple meal. It must be a bit wearying always to drink the world’s finest, most complex, demanding and attention-grabbing wines, though aside from collectors possessing rare fiduciary prowess and a select crew of wine critics that does not include me, most of us will never be able to test that hypothesis. After that prelude, then, here is a pinot noir wine of gratifying qualities, a perfectly balanced projection of the attributes I mentioned above. The Foursight Wines Charles Vineyard Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County, is a hand-crafted product — the popular term today is “artisan” — that was pressed in a wooden basket press, fermented with native yeast, saw only 40 percent new French oak and was bottled unfined and unfiltered. The color is a lovely medium ruby hue that shades to a transparent rim. First, we notice the wine’s spicy nature: cloves, sassafras and sandalwood, and then the expansive quality of its scents and flavors of macerated red raspberries, currants and plums, tinged with black fruit, something like cherry skins and pips and a note of black currant; a few minutes in the glass bring in hints of dust, graphite and loam for the essential earthy quality without which pinot noir wines seem to lack varietal integrity. While sensually pleasing with its supple and satiny texture, this pinot noir unfolds a burgeoning mineral edge honed, it feels, by a beam of bright and bracing acidity. The finish builds a case for the floral aspect with touches of lavender and rose petals, while the combination of wild berries and slightly candied berry fruit gives it a sheen that’s both feral and sophisticated. The alcohol content is a blessed and beautifully manageable 13.6 percent. Drink now through 2018 to 2020 with a roasted chicken, a grilled lamb or veal chop. Production was 224 cases. Winemaker for Foursight Wines is Joe Webb. Excellent. About $46.

A sample for review.


I opened this bottle of Champagne Friday night for LL’s birthday eve. The Laurent-Perrier Cuvée Rosé Brut is 100 percent pinot noir from 10 Grand Cru vineyards. The color is medium salmon-copper with a tinge of topaz, like tarnished silver over rose-gold, enhanced by a swirling upward tempest of tiny silver-flecked bubbles. Imagine a compote of strawberries, raspberries and rhubarb, macerated in orange zest, cloves, dried thyme and heather; couple that concept with notes of lightly toasted brioche, Rainier cherries and pink grapefruit, all founded on deeper layers of chalk and flint. Add the dimensions of a savory, resonant and bracing structure that balances sleekness, delicacy and elegance with an essential lithic and earthy character. Altogether fleet-footed yet dignified, evanescent yet enduring — at least until you finish the bottle. 12 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $99.

Imported by Laurent-Perrier U.S., Sausalito, Calif. A sample for review.

If a pinot noir wine doesn’t touch both the sublime of the ephemeral and the profundity of the chthonic, it is, to me, perhaps not a failure but a gravely lost opportunity in allowing the grape’s complicated and paradoxical virtues to express themselves. Greg Bjornstad, winemaker for Pfendler Vineyards, employs the panoply of craft, art and intuition to make pinot noirs that satisfy my desire for the broad range of the grape’s character and dimension. The winery is owned by Kimberly Pfendler, pictured here. The Pfendler Pinot Noir 2013, Sonoma Coast, aged 11 months in French oak barrels, 50 percent new. The color is a fairly opaque ruby shading to transparent magenta at the rim; what a seductive procession of black cherries and cranberries, with notes of cloves and sassafras, pomegranate, potpourri and sandalwood, emerges from the glass! The texture offers a lovely, dense, satiny drape that flows with lithe and lissome engagement on the palate, while a few moment’s pause for swirling, sniffing and sipping lend the wine hints of smoke and tobacco leaf, rose petals and rhubarb. Earthy, leathery elements burgeon, and the wine takes on more loamy, underbrushy qualities as it leans toward the power of slightly dusty tannins and a flinty mineral structure. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018 to ’20. Production was 350 cases. Excellent. About $45.

A sample for review.

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