Oregon


Etude Wines was founded in 1982 in Napa Valley by Tony Soter to focus on cabernet sauvignon and pinot noir made from purchased grapes grown in highly regarded vineyards. After a series of purchases, acquisitions and transformations, Etude is owned by Treasury Wine Estates, along with a rather astonishing roster of properties in California, Australia and other regions. The winery still concentrates on pinot noir and cabernet sauvignon, usually produced from named vineyards in small quantities. Under review today are six of Etude’s single-vineyard pinot noir wines from 2014, touching AVAs in Carneros, Sonoma Coast, Santa Maria Valley, Sta. Rita Hills in California; Yamhill-Carlton in Willamette Valley; and Central Otago in New Zealand. Winemaker is Jon Priest. These are, let me just say, splendid examples of the pinot noir grape and the resonance rung upon it by specific locations. Priest sensibly employs a minimal amount of oak, as well as keeping alcohol levels to reasonable levels. These are all worth searching for.

Samples for review.
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The Etude Ellenbach Vineyard Pinot Noir 2014, Sonoma Coast, aged 13 months in French oak, percent new barrels. The steeply sloping vineyard sits at around 800 feet elevation, just above the morning fog line, four miles east of the Pacific Ocean. The color is dark ruby-mulberry with a slightly paler rim. A burst of cloves, allspice and sandalwood precedes notes of a compote of black and red cherries and plums, wreathed with loam and graphite, mint and iodine, presided over by high-tones of pomegranate and cranberry; pretty heady stuff, all right. On the palate, this pinot noir brings in more red fruit — cherries and currants — its deeply spicy character buoyed by slightly flinty minerality, dusty tannins and lively acidity that cuts a swath on the tongue. The finish delivers a polished melange of spice, graphite tinged minerals and an element of heathery meadow flowers. 14.8 percent alcohol. Now through 2020 to ’24. Excellent. About $60.
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The Etude Grace Benoist Ranch Estate Grown Pinot Noir 2014, Carneros, aged 12 months in French oak, 25 percent new barrels. Located at the northwest corner of the Carneros AVA, the vineyard features various types of well-drained, rocky volcanic soils and is influenced by breezes from the Pacific. The color is medium mulberry-magenta shading to a transparent circumference. Scents of red and black cherries are permeated by notes of sassafras, pomegranate and cranberry, talc, lilac and rose petals; the perfume grows deeper and more redolent as the moments pass. This pinot noir embodies beautiful shape and substance, flowing on the tongue like perfection in a lithe, supple stream of satiny texture; there’s a touch of baked plum in the red and black fruit flavors and a strain of dusty graphite minerality to the subtle yet skillfully chiseled tannins. 14.3 percent alcohol. Now through 2020 to ’24. Excellent. About $45.
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The superlative transparent violet-magenta hue of the Etude North Canyon Vineyard Pinot Noir 2014, Santa Maria Valley, belies the seriousness of its frame and foundation and its earthy, loamy character. The vineyard, planted in calcareous clay sandstone, lies in a secluded canyon that’s a bit more exposed to sunlight and a bit warmer than the rest of the valley. The wine aged 10 months in French oak, 25 percent new barrels, the least oak influence of these six wines. A complex array of spicy effects — cloves, sassafras and cumin — heightens elements of ripe red and black cherries that open to notes of wild berries and oolong tea, pomegranate and cranberries. A profoundly earthy, loamy character penetrates the entire enterprise, lending deep roots for its graphite-tinged tannins and minerality. 14.4 percent alcohol. Now through 2021 to ’25. Excellent. About $45.
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Location is everything, n’est-ce pas? For example, the Fiddlestix Vineyard lies in the Sta. Rita Hills AVA that is part of the larger Santa Ynez Valley AVA, all encompassed by Santa Barbara County. The hills and ranges run east and west here, unusual for California where the typical etu_12fiddlestix_pinot_nv_400x126 mountainous orientation is north-south, and a configuration that allows a direct inlet for fog and cooling ocean breezes. The vineyard receives its share of those daily climatic events but stands low enough against the hills to be sheltered from strong afternoon winds. The combination of exposure and protection with well-drained clay-loam and calcareous marine shale soils results in pinot noir wines of great depth and finesse.

The Etude Fiddlestix Vineyard Pinot Noir 2014, Sta. Rita Hills, aged 12 months in French oak, 25 percent new barrels. The color is a transparent medium ruby-magenta hue of transfixing radiance; aromas of rhubarb, sassafras and sandalwood, pomegranate and cranberry, smoky black cherries and plums achieve a Platonic level of loveliness, while on the palate the wine is lithe, supple and satiny. juicy black and red cherry flavors reach down to elements of some rooty black tea, talc and chalk and a kind of gravelly condensation of graphite minerality. A few minutes in the glass bring out notes of rose petals and lavender. Redolent, even pungent; deeply spicy and flavorful; elegant and fine-boned yet with a dynamic of bright acidity, lightly dusted tannins and the shaping force of subtle oak — this is one of the most complete and wholly beautiful pinot noirs I have tasted this year. 14.3 percent alcohol. Now through 2020 to ’24. Exceptional. About $45.
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This wine takes us to Oregon’s Willamette Valley. Approved in 2004, the Yamhill-Carlton District AVA is a horse-shoe shaped region that includes only acreage that lies between 200 and 1,000 feet elevation, where marine sediments compose some of the oldest soil in Willamette Valley. The vineyard from which this wine is derived stands at 600 feet. The Etude Yamhill Vista Vineyard Pinot Noir 2014, Yamhill-Carlton District, aged 13 months in French oak, 33 percent new barrels. The color is transparent medium ruby shading to a mulberry rim; to notes of black cherries and plums, pomegranate and cranberry, the wine adds touches of tobacco and black tea, mint and iodine, as well as the deep loamy character typical of Willamette Valley pinot noir. The texture is superbly satiny, though powered by swingeing acidity and energetic tannins; the wine is quite dry, revealing an immediacy of granitic minerality that leads to a brooding, chiseled finish. 14.3 percent alcohol. Now through 2021 to ’24. Excellent. About $60.
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Talk about far afield, this wine takes us to New Zealand and Central Otago, the world’s southernmost wine region. The Etude Bannockburn Pinot Noir 2014, Central Otago, spent 12 months in French oak, 30 percent new barrels. I found this to be an extremely fine-grained, richly detailed and slightly exotic pinot noir. The color is transparent magenta-mulberry with a delicate rim; aromas of macerated and lightly stewed red and black cherries are permeated by notes of cloves and allspice, red licorice and violets, loam and damp wood ash; after 15 or 20 minutes, the bouquet unfurls hints of cedar, iodine and rosemary. Nothing opulent or flamboyant here, the wine is spare and honed, riven by arrows of acidity and borne by gravel-like minerality and layers of loam and foresty elements. 13.8 percent alcohol. I loved it. Now through 2020 to ’24. Excellent. About $60.
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I know, I could have written, “Two Groups of Pinots, Three Each,” but I like the off-rhyme of “trios” and “pinots,” as well as the rhythm of the line. So be it.

In any case, the two groups of pinot noir wines, three each, under review today have little to do with each other except for the grape variety. Inman Family Wines is in Sonoma County’s Russian River Valley AVA, while Zena Crown lies in the Eola-Amity Hills AVA of Oregon’s Willamette Valley, considerably to the north. Jackson Family Wines purchased the vineyard just west of Salem in 2013. The other quality these wines share is that, whatever differences they display because of the divergence in geography, geology, climate and terroir (and oak regimen), each is a model of what can be done with the grape by thoughtful growers and winemakers concentrating on a particular place.

These wines were samples for review.
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The Zena Crown Vineyard Conifer Pinot Noir 2013, Eola-Amity Hills, aged 17 months in French oak, connifer75 percent new barrels. The grapes derive from the vineyard’s East 12 and West 1A and 14 blocks, grown in volvanic soil of varying depths. The color is a beautiful transparent medium ruby shading to an ethereal rim; aromas of red and black cherries are wreathed with notes of sassafras, rhubarb and cloves, all becoming a little meaty and fleshy as the moments pass and then opening to a hint of some shy astringent woodland flower. This is a rooty, tea-like pinot noir that expands to touch areas of loam, briers and brambles as well as reaching to depths of real tannic and acidic power, yet displaying a delicate floral filigree around the circumference. There’s a mineral edge that becomes more spare and chiseled through the finish, which contributes a final fillip of resiny pine and rosemary and an autumnal haze of leaf-smoke. 13 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2020 to ’23. Production was 240 cases. A pinot noir of awesome, paradoxical and wholly gratifying complexity. Excellent. About $75.
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The Zena Crown (Sigma) Pinot Noir 2013, Eola-Amity Hills — the Greek capital Sigma is a symbol for zena-259“sum” in mathematics, though that’s putting the case rather simply; WordPress will not allow the symbol to be uploaded to this page — aged 17 months in French oak, 71 percent new barrels; the grapes are grown in Blocks 4, 5 and 12 of the vineyard, providing a varied background of characteristics. First is the dark ruby hue that shades to vivid magenta, then a wealthy perfumed bouquet of talc, lavender and violets, cranberry and pomegranate, graphite and loam. This is a deep rich pinot noir that feels sifted and layered in complexity, and while you note with a touch of alarm the presence of oak, that element subsides to become a shaping factor rather than a dominant influence. Lip-smacking acidity keeps the wine taut and animated, while it practically vibrates around a core of graphite, iodine and iron. 12.9 percent alcohol, a truly benign presence in this age of 14.5 percent and higher. Production was 302 cases. Drink now through 2021 through 2024. Excellent. About $75.
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Blocks East 5 and 6 of the Zena Crown Vineyard start at 600 feet elevation and slope to the south, allowing plenty of sunlight exposure. The Zena Crown “Slope” Pinot Noir 2013, Eola-Amity zena_slope_laydownHills, aged 17 months in French oak, 85 percent new barrels, which seems to me to be an extraordinary amount of new oak for pinot, but the wine apparently soaked up that wood influence and came out with tremendous confidence and elan, with lovely heft and balance, and a lithe supple, satiny texture; it rolls across the palate like liquid money. (You’ll need some money if you want to buy a few bottles.) The color is brilliant medium ruby shading to an ephemeral, invisible rim; it’s a rooty, brambly and briery pinot noir that offers plenty of earthy-loamy elements to shore up scents and flavors of black cherries, currants and plums with a tinge of red fruit and hints of sassafras and cloves. It’s a large-framed wine within its context of succulence, acid brightness and dusty tannins, all subsumed to a broad component of graphite minerality. 12.7 percent alcohol, and when was the last time you saw a wine from California with this sensible an alcohol level? Drink now through 2020 to ’23. Production was 348 cases. Excellent. About $100.
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Let’s start with an email statement from owner and winemaker Kathleen Inman:

“As for barrel regime, I purchased six new Sirugue barrels and 2 Billon barrels (used for the inman-sexton
Sexton only) for my Pinot in 2013 and I think I began with 78 or 80 barrels of Pinot that year. That would be about 10% new each year. I use my barrels for up to 8 years. I do not keep track of how many new, one-year, two-year or older barrels go into each final blend. My answer to how much oak is – the right amount of oak for my taste.” In other words, new oak at this winery is held to a bare minimum, with the emphasis placed on a blend of wines from barrels of myriad ages.

So, let’s go now to the Inman Family Wines Sexton Road Vineyard Pinot Noir 2013, Sonoma Coast. The color is moderately dark ruby shading to lavender transparency; you notice immediately the notes of black and red cherries with the slight astringency of their skins and pits, hints of cloves, sassafras and sandalwood. This pinot is substantial, with real heft and thrust, but it feels weightless on the palate in a wonderful contention and resolution of the feminine and masculine elements; a few moments in the glass bring in layers of leather and loam and forest floor, rhubarb and beet-root, all encompassed in a super supple satiny texture. Give this an hour and the finely-milled and sifted tannins assert themselves. 14.3 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2019 or ’21. Excellent. About $68.
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inman-pratt
The Inman Family Pratt Vine Hill Pinot Noir 2013, Russian River Valley, displays a ravishing hue of transparent medium ruby fading to an invisible rim; if you could exist on color alone, this would be it. Aromas of cloves and pomegranate, sandalwood, red cherries and currants, lilac and rose petals, red licorice and loam circulate from the glass; it’s a dark, spicy, feral pinot noir, fleet with musky, meadowy notes of melon and cloves, loam and leather. The texture is supple and lithe, with a satin drape on the palate cut by rigorous acidity, dusty tannins and graphite minerality. 13.8 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2019 to 2023. Excellent. About $68.
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inman-ogv
The Inman Family OGV Estate Pinot Noir 2013, Russian River Valley, retains a grip on inscrutability and reserve while exhibiting a panoply of sensual pleasures and potential. The color is a transparent mulberry-magenta hue; aromas of pomegranate and cloves, cranberry and sassafras open to notes of red and black cherries, leather and loam. Layers of sanded, polished and insistent tannins offer enough grit to provide some resistance on the palate, while bright acidity cuts a swath through the remarkably supple, satiny texture. The sense of animation blanaced by a paradoxical dark, brooding quality lends the wine great personality and character. 14.2 percent alcohol. This could use a year to age, but try through 2022 to ’24. Excellent. About $73.
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As far as white wines are concerned, Spring and Summer tend to be the domains of bright, light, delicate wines that go down easy as aperitifs while we’re sitting out on the porch or patio or lounging in a bosky dell on a frolicsome picnic. Nothing wrong with those scenarios at all. Now that the weather is in transition, however, when there’s a touch of chilly, rainy uncertainty in the air and our thoughts are sliding toward more substantial fare than cucumber and watercress sandwiches — no crusts, please! — the logical choice would be white wines with a bit more heft, flavor and savor. The 10 examples under review today provide those qualities in diverse ways, because they are, naturally, diverse wines. Grapes include sauvignon blanc, riesling, roussanne and marsanne, vermentino, verdicchio and trebbiano. Some of the wines saw no oak while others received extended barrel aging. Their points of origin range from various spots in Italy and several regions in California, from Alsace in France to Pfalz in Germany. Above all, and I cannot emphasize this note too strenuously, every one of these wines was a joy to drink, first because they are so different each to each, and second because in their eloquent variations they reflect integrity of intentions in the vineyard and the winery, an integrity dedicated to the expressiveness of a location and grape varieties. Each wine mentioned here made me feel as if I were sipping liquid gold.
Unless otherwise noted, these wines were samples for review.
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The pale gold Arrow&Branch Sauvignon Blanc 2015, Napa Valley, performs that gratifying task of balancing the utmost in a delicate, elegant character with a vivacious, appealing personality. Aromas of pea shoot, heather, cucumber and lime peel are infused with damp limestone and flint, roasted lemon and lemon balm and a hint of raspberry leaf. The wine is bright and crisp, dense but paradoxically ethereal, and it opens to touches of almond skin and pear skin, waxy white flowers and a hint of the wildly exotic and tropical. All of these exuberant elements are handily restrained by brisk acidity and the mild spicy/woodsy aura of a touch of French oak. 14.1 percent alcohol. A truly beautiful sauvignon blanc, made by Jennifer Williams, for consuming through 2018 or ’19. Exceptional. About $35.
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barmes
The color of the Domaine Barmès-Buecher “Hengst” Riesling Grand Cru 2012, Alsace, is a slightly brassy medium gold hue of intense purity; the bouquet unfurls multiple layers of nuance as Platonic ripeness invests aromas of peach and quince touched with hints of lychee, musk-melon and apricot nectar, yielding to apples, green tea and lemongrass and an intriguing, lingering note of petrol. The wine is moderately sweet at entry but segues to dryness as it flows across the palate, reaching a finish that feels profoundly minerally with elements of iodine-washed limestone and flint. Between those points, a lithe silky texture is emboldened by vibrant acidity, a strain of savory, woodsy spices and macerated stone-fruit flavors. 14 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2020 to ’24. Excellent. About $36.
Imported by Petit Pois/Sussex Wine Merchants, Moorestown, N.J.
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Hungarians are justly proud of their indigenous grape, furmint. Tasting through a few furmintexamples recently, I was impressed by the grape’s versatility and its capacity for making wines that are seemingly light-filled and weightless in affect yet layered in complexity of detail and dimension. The Béres Tokaji Furmint 2014, Szaraz, displays a light golden-yellow hue and subtle aromas of ripe lemons, apples and pears; a few moments in the glass unveil notes of straw, heather, thyme and peach. A particular sense of balance between the sweet ripeness of the stone-fruit flavors and the dry, bright acid and mineral structure creates an immensely satisfying effect, the entire package driving leisurely to a limestone and flint-packed finish. 13 percent alcohol. The sort of wine that makes you happy to drink. Now through 2018 or ’19. Winemaker was János Jarecsni. Excellent. About $19, representing Good Value.
Imported by New Wines of Hungary,
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What a beauty this is! The Weingut Eugen Müller Forster Mariengarten Riesling Kabinett, forster2013, Pfalz, is a wild, meadowy, golden, sleek and crystalline riesling whose very pale straw hue almost shimmers in the glass; notes of peaches, lime peel and lychee feel a little slate-y and loamy, though there’s nothing earth-bound about the wine’s delicacy and elegance. A few moments in the glass bring in hints of green apples and cloves, while a sweet entry retains a modest claim of a fairly dry, limestone-etched finish. 9.5 percent alcohol. Now through 2021 to ’23. Excellent. About $19, a local purchase and Real Value.
A Terry Theise Estate Selection, Skurnik Wines, New York.
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gallica
Rosemary Cakebread made only 180 cases of her Gallica Albarino 2015, Calaveras County, so you should call the winery right now and try to reserve a few bottles. The grapes derive from the Rorick Heritage Vineyard, located at about 2,000 feet elevation in the Sierra Foothills; the wine — including a touch of muscat blanc — aged nine months in stainless steel tanks and neutral French oak barrels. A pale yellow-gold hue presages aromas of yellow plums and pears, figs, acacia and heather that evolve to a slightly leafy, grassy quality. What a joyful, lively, expressive personality this wine offers; the texture is supple, suave and elegant, all elements defined by balance and seamlessness yet edging to wild, spicy, savory qualities in the chiseled finish. 14 percent alcohol. Now through 2019 or ’20. Excellent. About $36.
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The Garofoli “Podium” 2013, Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Classico Superiore, podiumincorporates no oak in its making and is all the better for it. Produced in Italy’s Marche region by a family that has been making wine since 1871, this 100 percent verdicchio offers a pure medium gold hue and ravishing aromas of tangerine and peach, jasmine and almond skin and — how else to say it? — rain on Spring flowers, yes, it’s that incredibly fresh and appealing. It’s also, somewhat paradoxically, quite dry and spare though warm, spicy and a bit earthy, enlivened by keen acidity and a scintillating quality of limestone and flint minerality. Again, it’s a wine that feels very satisfying to drink. 13 percent alcohol. Now through 2018 or ’19. Excellent. About $25.
Imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa Calif.
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My reaction on seeing that this white wine aged 22 months in new French oak barriques was a big “Uh-oh.” I mean, friends, that’s a whole heap of new wood influence. However, in the trebbianoMasciarelli Marina Cveti? Trebbiano Riserva 2013, Trebbiano d’Abruzzo, the eponymous winemaker manages to pull off a remarkable feat. The opening salvo is an attractive bright medium straw gold color; then come notes of candied tangerine and grapefruit peel, ginger and quince, cloves and a sort of light rain on dusty stones effect; after a few moments, the wine unfolds hints of lemon balm and roasted lemon, lilac and lavender. Yes, it’s pretty heady stuff. On the palate, this Trebbiano Riserva ’13 feels vital and vibrant, rich and succulent with spiced and slightly baked peach and apricot flavors, though its opulence is held in check by chiming acidity and a resonant chiseled limestone element. You feel the oak in the wine’s framework and foundation but as a supporting factor that lends shape and suppleness rather than as a dominant element. 14 percent alcohol. Quite an achievement for drinking through 2023 to ’25. Excellent. About $43.
Imported by Masciarelli Wine Co., Weymouth, Mass.
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E&J Gallo acquired distribution rights to the venerable family-operated Soave producer Pieropan in March 2015, adding it to Allegrini and Poggio al Tesoro in the company’s Luxury Wine Group. The Pieropan Soave Classico 2015 is a blend of 85 percent garganega grapes and 15 percent trebbiano di Soave, derived from certified organic vineyards. The wine saw no oak but fermented and matured in glass-line cement tanks. The color is pale yellow-gold; aromas of roasted lemons and spiced pears are bright, clean and fresh and permeated by notes of almond blossom, acacia and grapefruit rind. The wine delivers amazing heft and presence for the price category, yet it remains deft and light on its feet; brilliant acidity keeps it lively on the palate, while a saline limestone quality lends depth and poignancy. 12 percent alcohol. Drink through 2018. Excellent. About $20, representing Great Value.
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Steve Hall made the Troon Vineyard Longue Carabine 2014, Applegate Valley, Southern troon-carabineOregon, by co-fermenting different lots of marsanne, viognier, vermentino and roussanne grapes, with slim dollops apparently (depending on what infomation you read) of sauvignon blanc and early muscat. The final proportions of the blend are 38.5 percent vermentino, 33 percent viognier, 27 marsanne and 1.5 roussanne; information as to oak aging, type of oak and length of time is not available. The wine is seriously complex and intriguing. The color is pale straw-gold; the whole effect is spare, high-toned and elegant, with hints of baked peaches and pears, hints of grapefruit, fennel and celery leaf, bee’s-wax, lanolin and flowering heather, all robed in a tremendous acid-and-mineral structure that creates a sense of vital dynamism. above depths of dusty, flinty loam. These elements take time to blossom, the wine being fairly reticent at first. 12.5 percent alcohol. Production was 163 cases. Now through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $34.
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The Two Shepherds Catie’s Corner Viognier 2014, Russian River Valley, offers a 2-shepspale straw-gold hue and beguiling, compelling aromas of jasmine and gardenia, peach and pear, bee’s-wax and lanolin over hints of lime peel and grapefruit pith; the wine sees only neutral French oak, a device that lends shape and suppleness to the structure without incurring undue wood influence. Riveting acidity and a remarkable shapeliness and heft in the texture give the wine tremendous personality and eloquence. Time in the glass bring in notes of heather and thyme, roasted lemon and sage, lemon balm and sour melon, all elements engaged in a remarkably poised feat of crystalline tension and resolution. 13.3 percent alcohol. Brilliant wine-making from William Allen. Now through 2018 or ’19. Production was 75 cases, so go online now. Exceptional. About $26.
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Entry-level, of course, rests in the wallet of the beholder. The idea behind these wines — most of which were delivered to me as one package — is that they’re not single-vineyard, specific-block pinot noirs that cost $75 to $100. On the other hand, these prices range from about $20 to $48. Do I see anyone raising a hand for a $48-entry pinot noir? Only if it’s a Burgundy Premier Cru, s’il-vous plait. On the other hand, again, some enticing, some well-made, even some exciting wines are included in this group, as well as a few bargains that would make an eagle grin. As usual in these Weekend Wine Notes, I eschew the technical, historical and geographical information I normally dote upon for the sake of incisive reviews ripped as it were from the fevered verbiage of my notebooks. Enjoy, always in moderation!
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adelsheim
Adelsheim Vineyard Pinot Noir 2014, Willamette Valley. 13.5% alc. Dark ruby shading to a delicate magenta rim; black cherries, cloves and sassafras, with notes of leather, loam and woodsy framboise with a hint of leafy rasp; satiny smooth but slightly roughened by a light sandpapering of polished oak and dusty tannins; a few minutes in the glass bring in hints of tobacco and rhubarb. Very attractive. Now through 2019 or ’20. Excellent. About $32.
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anne-amie
Anne Amie Vineyards Winemaker’s Selection Pinot Noir 2014, Willamette Valley. 13.4% alc. Dark ruby shading to a transparent mulberry-hued rim; very spicy and loamy; rich and ripe black cherries and plums highlighted by sassafras, sandalwood and pomegranate; increasingly exotic, with notes of rose petals, lavender and cloves; a bounty of autumnal smoke and forest floor, briers and brambles; very silky texture, permeated by dusty, velvety tannins. Very attractive if a bit de trop. Now through 2019 or ’20. Excellent. About $28.
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a-to-z
A to Z Wineworks Pinot Noir 2014, Oregon. 13.5% alc. Transparent medium ruby fading to an ethereal rim; brambles and sassafras; smoky and highly spiced black cherries and plums; elements of leather, loam and graphite; light and lithe on the palate. Think of it like a Beaujolais-Villages at your favorite bistro. Very Good+. About $20.
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broadley
Broadley Vineyards Pinot Noir 2014, Willamette Valley. 13.2% alc. Vivid medium ruby hue with a transparent magenta rim; lovely and enticing bouquet that melds loam and heather, black cherries and currants steeped in oolong tea; rose petals and lilacs, cloves and sandalwood, and, after a few moments in the glass, notes of cranberry and pomegranate; totally irresistible; the texture is super satiny and supple, displaying gratifying heft and presence with the slight resistance of dusty, leathery tannins and bright acidity. Now through 2019 to ’20. Excellent. About $20, representing Great value.
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chehalem
Chehalem Wines Three Vineyard Pinot Noir 2014, Willamette Valley. 14% alc. Dark ruby color shading to a delicate magenta rim; first, the notes of rooty, woodsy elements, with forest floor and loam; then the ripe and spicy raspberries and red and black cherries; smoke and leather, hints of cloves and orange rind; plenty of tannic and acid grip keep the wine on a weighty but well-balanced keel, while a fruit-driven character drives through to the finish. Now through 2019 or ’20. Excellent. About $32.
The label image is one year behind the vintage reviewed.
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erath
Erath Winery Willakia Pinot Noir 2014, Eola-Amity Hills. 13.5% alc. A dark, strapping, earthy pinot noir, dense, super satiny and lithe; syrah-like in its density and iodine-iron-infused graphite elements. Try from 2018 to 2022. Very Good+. About $48.
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Illahe Vineyards Estate Pinot Noir 2014, Willamette Valley. 14% alc. Transparent medium ruby with an invisible rim; earth and loam, black cherries, blueberries and cranberries, pomegranate and sandalwood; dusty graphite, mint and heather, super sleek and satiny, with mild, slightly velvety tannins; the cherry element gets riper, though the wine is quite dry; smoke and ash, briers and brambles, a little raspberry leaf rasp; lovely, balanced and integrated but with real structure. Now through 2018 to ’20. Excellent. About $22, a local purchase.
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Montinore Estate Pinot Noir 2014, Willamette Valley. 13% alc. Dark ruby with a garnet flush and a light rim; musky, woodsy, loamy, with scents and flavors of crushed raspberries and spiced plums; very immediate and forward, immensely intriguing and appealing; briery-brambly tannins, bright acidity and a hint of graphite minerality complete an attractive and individual package. Now through 2018 to ’20. Very Good+. About $20.
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Picture 020 Ponzi Vineyards Tavola Pinot Noir 2014, Willamette Valley. 13.7% alc. Deep ruby color shading to a lighter, almost transparent rim; a dark, smoky, spicy, earthy, intense and brooding pinot noir, qualities consistent with my encounters with this wine in previous vintages; black cherry and plum flavors are imbued with dusty loamy tannins and invigorating acidity; the emphasis in this pinot noir is on power over finesse. Now through 2019 or ’20. Very Good+. About $27.
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Roco Winery Gravel Road Pinot Noir 2014, Willamette Valley. 145 alc. Dark ruby-mulberry 16436_ROW-GRPN-14_F-1lightening toward a transparent magenta rim; if you crushed black and red cherries and currants and let them steep in the sun in a jar of oolong tea, it would smell like this fresh, seductive wine; to which add a dusty, loamy element and notes of apple skin and cranberry, dried rosemary and sage; this is fairly deep and substantial, rich, spicy, foresty and savory, with inner hints of tar and bittersweet chocolate allied to velvety tannins; still, though, it avoids being plush or sumptuous because of its bright acidity and mineral character. Now through 2020 to ’22. I loved this one’s complexity and sense of risk and resolution. Excellent. About $30.
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love
R. Stuart & Co. “Love, Oregon” Pinot Noir 2014, Willamette Valley. NA% alc. Dark ruby shading to an almost invisible mulberry rim; seductive aromas of black and red cherries infused with smoke and sassafras, pomegranate and cranberry, lilac and lavender, with a visitation of loam and fennel seed; a high-minded and high-toned wine that gathers heft and presence in the glass and edges pinot noir into syrah territory. Now through 2018 to ’20. Very Good+. About $28.
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60 Souls Pinot Noir 2014, Willamette Valley. 14.5% alc. Medium ruby shading to transparent magenta; cloves and loam, smoky black cherries and currants, notes of cranberries and pomegranate; woodsy and briery, with a hint of raspberry’s rasp; appealing satiny texture; lots of virtues but not much personality. Now through 2018. Very Good+. About $25.
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Dick Troon planted vines in southern Oregon’s Applegate Valley in 1972, making him a pioneer in the state by any standards. He sold the winery and vineyards to his friend and fishing buddy Larry Martin in 2003, and Martin took the opportunity to start almost from scratch, reshaping the landscape and building a new facility. The philosophy at Troon Vineyard is as hands-off as possible, and includes the use of indigenous yeast, foot-treading and minimal contact with new oak. In fact, the three wines under consideration today — a malbec, a tannat and a blend of the two — each age 18 months in mature or neutral French oak, only two percent new barrels. Another recent change brings on Craig Camp as general manager. Many consumers and wine professionals will remember Camp for the turn-around he orchestrated for Cornerstone Cellars in Napa Valley, bringing that primarily cabernet sauvignon producer into new markets at several levels and cementing its national reputation. The Applegate Valley AVA was approved in 2000. It is enclosed by the Rogue Valley AVA, itself part of the much larger Southern Oregon AVA.

These wines were samples for review.
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troon malbec
The Troon Malbec 2013, Rouge Valley, Southern Oregon, displays an intense dark ruby hue, a radiant presage for a deep, intense spicy wine that revels, with brooding and breeding, in its ripe raspberry and plum scents and flavors, its dusty graphite element and its hints of lavender, violets and woodsy spice. The wine is quite dry, fairly loamy, briery and brambly, enlivened by clean, bright acidity and shaded by dense but lissome tannins. 13.7 percent alcohol. One of the best malbecs around. Production was 213 cases Excellent. About $29.
The label image is one vintage later than the wine reviewed here.
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The stablemate to the wine mentioned above is the Troon Estate Tannant 2013, Applegate Valley, Southern Oregon, a tannat so dark in its ruby-purple hue that it verges on motor-oil ebony. Notes of black plums, cherries and currants are infused with hints of cloves, cedar and tobacco, with a touch of ripe blueberry. Despite its depth, darkness and dimension, there’s nothing rustic about the wine, and in fact it’s more subtle and nuanced with detail than you would think, though it pulses with power and energy. The finish is sleek and chiseled with graphite and granitic minerality. 13.7 percent alcohol. A superior tannat. Production was 213 cases. Excellent. About $28.
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Finally, of this trio, we have the Troon M*T Reserve 2013, Southern Oregon, a blend of — to be precise — 55.67 percent malbec and 44.33 percent tannat. Again, no surprise, this is a deep, dark wine that burgeons with dark savory, salty baked plum and currant scents and flavors, the latter bolstered by dry brushy tannins, dusty graphite and vibrant acidity. A few moments in the glass unfurl notes of briery, woody and slightly raspy notes of raspberry and blueberry and undertones of oolong tea and orange rind, all balanced by a sense of spareness and paradoxically elegant poise. 13.7 percent alcohol. An unusual and fruitful combination. Production was 195 cases. Excellent. About $50.
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Ah, Summer — sea-coast and mountains, or perhaps just lazy weekend afternoons in your own backyard or on a patio or porch or balcony. Wherever you find yourself, you’ll need a glass of a cool, engaging, pretty wine to enjoy with picnic fare or appetizers or just to sip while contemplating all the goodness that life offers. I mean, cripes, we need that now! These Weekend Wine Notes are a bit fuller than usual because this post started off last week as a stand-alone piece but took too long. So now, here it is. All wines mentioned today were samples for review. All rate “Excellent,” even the cheap ones, so there are some real bargains here. Enjoy! And take care of yourselves, please.
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Ascevi Luwa Ronco Superiore Ceròu 2014, Friuli Isonza, Italy. 12.5% alc. 100% tocai friulano Ascevi-CEROU-Friulano-labelgrapes. The color is pale gold; collectively, in scent and flavor, the wine conjures a sense of mountain heather and valley meadows, of seaside and hillside; pears, almonds and peaches dominate, along with jasmine and honeysuckle, while a hint of honey leavens the savory-saline quality, though the wine is, as they say, bone-dry. Limestone-seashell minerality adds vividness to the wine’s crystalline clarity and chiming acidity, all borne on a lithe, alluring texture. This rates a big “Wow!” Drink now through 2018 or ’19. Production was 500 cases. Excellent. About $18, marking Great Value.
Imported by Quintessential Wines, Napa, Calif.
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Colome Torrontes
Colomé Torrontés 2015, Calchaqui Valley, Salta, Argentina. 13.5% alc. 100% torrontés grapes. Derived from vineyards above 5,000 feet, this pale gold torrontes shimmers with notes of jasmine, lilac and talc, brambly pear and lychee, bee’s-wax and lanolin, then opening to hints of roasted lemon, sage and bay leaf. Crisp and lively on the palate, propelled by tart and taut acidity, the wine features a lovely, lithe, supple texture and a finish that’s suave with a sunny-leafy-figgy character and a deeper tone of grapefruit bitterness. This wonderful complexity on perhaps the best torrontés wine I have tasted has nothing to do with oak. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $15, a Remarkable Bargain.
Imported by The Hess Collection Winery, Napa Calif.
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Dry Creek Vineyard Wilson Ranch Dry Chenin Blanc 2015, Clarksburg. 13% alc. The Clarksburg AVA 2015_Chenin_Blanc_label_rgb
includes portions of Sacramento County, Solano County and Yolo County in the Sacramento Valley. The color is very pale straw-gold; notes of hay and heather, pear and jasmine and an intriguing strain of a dusty garrigue-like meadowy quality lend this wine a distinct summery aspect. Hints of gooseberry and brambly currants, quince and ginger complete the lithe, spare, vibrant package. Always a favorite in our house. Excellent. About $13, representing Terrific value.
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FEL Pinot Gris 2015, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County. 14% alc. A pale gold hue for a wine thatPinot-Gris-Anderson-Valley feels golden; notes of ripe pears and peaches are cloaked in dusty, graphite mineral elements and wreathed with jasmine and lilac; a few moments in the glass produce hints of green apple, gunflint, quince and ginger and fresh-mown hay; tremendous minerality and acidity give this wine unexpected grip and power, aspects that do not, however, subtract from its delicate, leafy, lacy qualities. It seems to glow with sunlight from within. The wine fermented in a 900-gallon French oak tank (30%), small neutral French oak barrels (30%) and stainless steel tanks (40%). Produxction was 1,322 cases. Drink through 2019 to 2020. Excellent. About $25.
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Garofoli Serra del Conte 2014, Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Classico. 12% alc. The DOC is in the province of Ancona in Italy’s Marches region, close to the Adriatic sea. The color is pale straw; notes of hay and dry grass, spiced pear and peach and fleshy white flowers like gardenias and camellias distinguish the utterly beguiling bouquet, which opens to exotic hints of powdered cloves and coriander. The texture is silken, lithe and supple, driven by crystalline acidity and a lacy limestone mineral quality, all supporting stone-fruit flavors heightened by a note of grapefruit bitterness on the finish. Excellent. About $11 — no kidding! — so Buy It by the Case Right Now.
Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif.
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Stinson Vineyards Rosé 2015, Monticello, Virginia. 12.5% alc. 100% mourvèdre grapes. Production was 150 cases. A rose wine of extreme delicacy and elegance, this model offers a pale salmon-peach hue and transporting hints of orange zest and ripe strawberries, melon and sour cherry, with high notes of rose petals and violets. There’s enough limestone minerality and a touch of loamy earthiness in this rosé that resists being merely charming, while its quite dry texture leads to a spice and dried herb finish. Excellent. About $21.
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Le-Rosse
Tommasi Le Rosse Pinot Grigio 2015, delle Venezia, Italy. 12% alc. This superior pinot grigio starts with a pale gold hue and then offers beguiling notes of jasmine and honeysuckle, peach and pear, dried thyme and lightly smoked almonds, adding a small flourish of greengage and melon on the finish. It’s quite dry, bracing in its savory and saline qualities and animated by a whip-lash of flint and bright acidity. Delectable, with a slightly serious edge and real character. Excellent. About $17, Good Value.
Imported by Vintus LLC, Pleasantville, N.Y.
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troon
Troon Vineyard Vermentino Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Applegate Valley, Southern Oregon. 12.5% alc. 80% vermentino, 20% sauvignon blanc. Production was 167 cases. The color is a shimmering pale straw hue; notes of roasted lemons and spiced pears burgeon from the glass, attended by hints of greengage and yellow flowers, dried thyme, heather and meadow grass. The wine displays real grip for a white wine that’s not chardonnay or riesling and reveals remarkable detail and dimension in its permeable layers of dusty limestone and flint minerality, its dense and lithe texture and its nuances of spicy citrus and stone-fruit flavors, all energized by vivid acidity. Quite a performance. Drink through 2018 to 2020. Excellent. About $24.
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Two Shepherds Fanucchi Vineyard Trousseau Gris 2014, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. 2014TrousseauGrisfrontWinemaker William Allen ferments the white grapes (using native yeast) on the skins for the first five days, imparting a pale copper-smoky topaz hue, and after fermentation ages the wine eight months in neutral oak barrels. Neither a white wine nor a red or rose, this intriguing effort offers notes of spiced pear, Rainier cherries and yellow plums with a ping of red currant at the core; like a rosé from Provence, this wine embodies that ineffable yet characteristic aspect of dusty-damp roof tiles, yet unlike any rosé it features hints of savory and slightly bitter almond skin and a saline line of marsh grass. The finish is almost sherry-like. Another memorable performance. 13.5 percent alcohol. Production was 125 cases. Drink through 2018. Excellent. About $28.
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O.K., not a totally A to Z line, but the roster for today’s Weekend Wine Notes runs from albariño to zinfandel, with several alphabetical stops between those points, nine of them including a couple of real bargains, though all represent good value. As usual in these Weekend Wine Notes, I eschew the plethora of technical, historical, geographical and personnel data that we dote upon so dearly for the sake of quick and incisive reviews intended to pique your interest and whet your palate. Enjoy!

With one exception, these wines were samples for review.
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Arios Albariño 2014, Rias Baixas, Spain. 12.5% alc. Pale pale straw-gold hue; roasted lemons and ariospears, dried thyme and heather, white flowers and a touch of flint; very dry, scintillating with pert acidity and a brisk limestone element; lovely lemon and peach flavors, lightly glossed with cloves and honey. Super attractive and eminently drinkable. Very Good+. About $15.
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FEL Wines Chardonnay 2014, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County. 14.2% alc. Pale gold color; FEL-Logo_850x500roasted lemon, lemon drop, pineapple and grapefruit; beguiling notes of jasmine and gardenia, quince and ginger, with flint in the background; marked purity and intensity, vibrant and resonant with keen acidity and limestone and chalk minerality, yet seductive in its supple, talc-like texture that laves the palate; ripe citrus flavors with a touch of baked stone-fruit; a beautifully shaped, high-minded and crystalline chardonnay, for drinking through 2018 to 2020. Excellent. About $28.
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Vento di Mare Nerello Mascalese 2013, Terre Siciliane. 13% alc. Deep ruby-purple; robust and CMYK basehearty, featuring intense aromas of violets and lavender, dark spicy cherries, with something of cherry skin and pit pungency and bitterness; plums and currants; leafy, woodsy notes of cedar and dried rosemary, with the latter’s characteristic resinous nature; shaggy tannins, dense and chewy; penetrating acidity and granitic minerality. Perfect for full-flavored pizzas and pasta dishes, burgers with bacon and cheddar cheese, grilled pork chops with a Southwestern rub; you get the idea. Very Good+. About $12, so Buy It by the Case.
Imported by Middleton Family Wines, Shandon, Calif.
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Giesen The Brothers Pinot Noir 2013, Marlborough, New Zealand. 14.5% alc. 500 cases imported. Medium transparent ruby color; ferrous and sanguinary, with notes of iodine and mint, pomegranate and cranberry, baked cherries and raspberries; deep and warm, spicy and savory; a definite foresty element animated by fleet acidity; fairly tannic for a pinot noir, dusty and almost velvety, but reigned in by sleek elegance; polished oak stays in the background, giving the wine shape and suppleness. Drink through 2019 to ’21. Excellent. About $30.
Imported by Constellation Brands, Gonzales, Calif.
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2012PastoralRouge
Two Shepherds Pastoral Rouge 2012, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. 12.5% alc. 45% grenache, 30% mourvedre, 25% syrah. Production was 200 cases. Medium ruby hue shading to garnet; smoked plums, bruised raspberries and a touch of blueberry, hints of red licorice, leather and loam; slightly spicy and tea-like, meaning black tea; lithe and expressive on the palate, very clean, a bit chiseled in its graphite-tinged minerality and lightly dusted tannins that take on more heft through the finish; a southern Rhône-style blend that’s elevating and balletic rather than dense and earth-bound; “pastoral,” indeed, in its irresistible, meadowy appeal to life and eating and drinking al fresco. Drink through 2018 to 2020. Excellent. About $36.
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La Domitienne Rosé 2015, Vin de Pays d’Oc, France. 12.5% alc. 50% each cinsault and grenache. Pale la_domitienne_rose_GWP_2015_label-no-guidescopper-onion skin color; delicate and slightly leafy strawberry and raspberry scents and flavors, though it’s a wild and bosky rosé, suave and fairly robust, savory and saline, dry and flinty, and lively in its bright acidity. A real thirst-quencher, with surprising complexity for the price. Very Good+. About $10, a Raving Bargain.
Imported by Guarachi Wine Partners, Woodland, Calif.
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Star Lane Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc 2015, Happy Canyon of Santa Barbara County. NA% alc. Pale straw-gold hue; star-like clarity of grapefruit, lime peel and papaya, with spiced pear and hints of lemongrass and lilac; bright acidity paired with clean limestone-flint minerality, yet a fairly earthy sauvignon blanc, with seeming connections to the loamy soil from which it sprang. Now through 2017 or ’18. Very Good+. About $22.
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Illahe
Illahe Viognier 2015, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 12.5% alc. Very pale gold hue; jasmine and gardenia, pears and green apples, hints of lanolin and bee’s-wax; very dry, spare, but with a ravishing silken texture and flavors of lightly spiced and macerated pear and peach; crystalline acidity and a hint of a limestone edge, leading to a touch of grapefruit on the finish. Really lovely. Excellent. About $17. (A local purchase at $20.)
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Dry Creek Vineyards Heritage Vines Zinfandel 2014, Sonoma County. 14.5% alc. 78% zinfandel, 20 2014_Heritage_label_rgbpercent petite sirah, 1% each primitivo and carignan. Dark ruby; blackberries, currents and plums, notes of cloves and black pepper, orange rind and oolong tea; quite dry, an evocative woodsy zinfandel, seething with briers and brambles, a hint of damp leaves, supported by dusty, graphite-tinged tannins and lip-smacking acidity; a supple, spice-laden finish. gratifyingly balanced and layered for drinking through 2019 or 2020. Excellent. About $22.
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I am fond of pinot noir wines from Oregon’s Willamette Valley, particularly for what I perceive to be a general feature of such wines, a thread of rich, damp loamy character that bolsters the other qualities of fruit, acidity and minerality. I love this sensation that feels like a grounding in the earth, this evidence of things unseen under the vineyard. The Willamette Valley AVA was approved in 1984, and over the years was divided into six sub-AVAs as variations in micro-climate and soil were identified. The smaller AVAs are Dundee Hills, McMinnville, Eola-Amity Hills, Chehalem Mountains, Ribbon Ridge and Yamhill-Carlton. What’s interesting about the last region is that only grapes grown in vineyards from 200 to 1,000-feet elevation are entitled to the appellation; the federal government is typically not so fastidious about such matters. The wines under review today originate from the general Willamette AVA and from three of the sub-AVAs. The vintages run from 2011 to 2014, but are mainly 2012 and ’13, both excellent years for the area. As usual in the Weekend Wine Notes posts, I eschew details of technical, historical, geographical and personality elements for the sake for incisive reviews, ripped, as it were, from the pages of my notebooks and designed to pique your interest and whet your palate. With two exceptions, duly noted, these wines were samples for review. Enjoy!
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Argyle Nuthouse Lone Star Vineyard Pinot Noir 2013, Eola-Amity Hills. 13.5% alc. Beguiling 15112_ARG-NHPN-13-F_1transparent medium ruby hue; a complex and seamless layering of iodine, plums and graphite, sassafras, rhubarb and pomegranate, with plenty of smoked black cherries as highlights; supple, light and racy but offering pleasing depth and dimension in texture and structure; almost succulent in its tasty ripeness but honed by bright acidity; some time in the glass brings in hints of leather and loam. Pretty much a masterpiece, for drinking through 2020 to 2023. Excellent. About $50.
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David Hill Vineyards and Winery Black Jack Pinot Noir 2012, Willamette Valley. 13.8% alc. This pinot noir spent two years in new and used French oak, a device that contributes both to its superficial exoticism and to a general flattening and muting of varietal character. Very Good. About $55.
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Domaine Serene Evenstad Reserve Pinot Noir 2011, Willamette valley. 13.1% alc. Medium ruby color with a brick-red rim; cloves and sandalwood, violets and lavender, graphite and loam; spiced and macerated red and black currants and cherries with a background of plums; displays the profound structure and presence that a reserve wine should evince, but not without elegance and finesse; a deep foresty element with a glossy iodine and iron sheen. Now through 2023 to ’25. Excellent. About $75. (A local purchase, about $85.)
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Erath Winery Prince Hill Pinot Noir 2012, Dundee Hills. 13.5% alc. Limpid medium ruby color; first come exotic notes of cloves, sandalwood and rose petals, followed by red cherries and currants, leather and loam, briers and brambles; a lithe and sinewy interpretation of the grape, with acid that plows a furrow on the palate and a background of graphite minerality; soft, slightly talc-like tannins take on more rigor as the moments pass, serving as framework for red berries seemingly steeped in some rooty black tea. Elemental. Now through 2022 to ’25. Excellent. About $50.
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Ghost Hill Cellars Bayliss-Bower Vineyards Pinot Noir Blanc 2013, Yamhill-carlton. 13.5% alc. I ghostfind the white pinot noir phenomenon inexplicable, though this example is appealing enough, with laudable delicacy and elegance. Brilliant topaz-light copper hue; orange zest and peaches, notes of red cherries and currants; slightly loamy, a touch meadowy; bright acidity but still, the wine is curiously characterless. Drink up. Very Good. About $25.
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Grochau Cellars Pinot Noir 2012, Dundee Hills. 14.1% alc. Transparent medium ruby-garnet; earthy grochau-cellars-logoand spicy, with loam, briers and brambles, cloves and allspice; macerated red and black cherries with a hint of cranberry; spare and sinewy, with acidity that plows a furrow; very dry, a lovely texture, but a fairly rigorous and demanding pinot noir (which I like). Now through 2018 or ’19. Excellent. About $33.
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Grochau Cellars Pinot Noir 2012, Eola-Amity. 14.1% alc. Slightly darker ruby color with a tinge grochau-cellars-logoof magenta; red currants and cherries with a note of pomegranate; dense, spicy; graphite-edged tannins and a lithe, supple texture; you feel the earth, the leather, some root-like tea and smoke-etched autumn leaves; grows loamier and spicier as the moments pass, while the hints of dried red berries circulate. Now through 2018 to 2020. Excellent. About $33.
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Lenne Estate Pinot Noir 2012, Yamhill-Carlton. 14.5% alc. 586 cases. A delicate medium ruby hue; red and black cherries, pomegranate and cranberry, cloves, sassafras and white pepper; just a lovely, lithe, graceful pinot noir that gradually pulls up elements of loam, sour cherry and melon, briers and brambles; it gets denser and more intense as the moments pass, but never loses its foothold in elegance and an eloquent expression of the grape. Now through 2018 to 2020. Excellent. About $45.
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Lenne Estate Kill Hill Pinot Noir 2013, Yamhill-Carlton. 13.5% alc. 75 cases. Transcendent medium ruby hue shading to magenta; cloves and sassafras, black cherries and currants freighted by a seam of loam, briers and brambles; a sort of talc-like powderiness about the texture cut by bright acidity; a finish of leather, loam and graphite and a high note of cranberry. Beguiling marriage of elegance and energy. Now through 2019 to ’21. Excellent. About $55.
The label image is one vintage behind.
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Patricia Green Cellars Reserve Pinot Noir 2014, Willamette Valley. 14% alc. Medium ruby shading to a transparent magenta rim; spiced and macerated black and red cherries and currants, iodine and mint, loam and licorice; quite lively and engaging, with resonant acidity and scintillating graphite minerality, these elements bolstering a compote of red and black berry flavors whose hints of dried spices and herbs — cloves, sage, thyme — serve to point up the wine’s purity and intensity. Try from 2017 through 2022 to ’24. Excellent. About $25. (A local purchase, $28.)
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Ponzi Vineyards Tavola Pinot Noir 2014, Willamette Valley. 13.7% alc. Medium transparent ponzi logoruby-magenta color; smoky and spicy black cherries, opens to cloves, sandalwood and rose petals; lots of energy and presence and a definite tannic structure; super-satiny texture laves the palate; the loamy aspects burgeon; terrific substance but at the expense of elegance and finesse. Now through 2020 to ’22. Very Good+. About $27.
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Vidon Vineyard 3 Clones Estate Pinot Noir 2013, Chehalem mountain. 14.3% alc. 480 cases. Medium transparent ruby color; bright, fresh and vital, with red cherries and raspberries and a hint of cranberry, notes of cloves, rhubarb and beetroot; incisive acidity cuts a swath; quite graceful, nothing obvious or opulent; pulls up more spice and a slightly dusty tannic element; touches of melon, sour cherry and apple skin on the elegant finish. Now through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $40.
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Vidon Vineyard 3 Clones Estate Pinot Noir 2011, Chehalem Mountain. 13.9% alc. 518 cases. Medium Ruby-garnet hue; heady aromas of mint and sassafras, cranberry, pomegranate and cloves, dried cherries and currants; almost supernaturally sleek, supple and satiny in texture, with a chiseled arrow of acidity that lends spareness to a fairly rigorous structure; a few minutes in the glass bring up notes of underbrush and loam. A beautifully constructed pinot noir, now through 2018 to 2020. Excellent. About $40.
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Youngberg Hill Jordan Pinot Noir 2011, Willamette Valley. 12% alc. It’s interesting that I wrote 2012-Jordan-PN-300x207about the 2012 versions of these Youngberg Hill wines a year ago but received the 2011s for review later; here’s a link to those reviews. A lovely limpid light ruby color; lean and incisive, with elevating aromas of cranberry and cloves, sassafras, a hint of rhubarb and pomegranate, red raspberries and currants; beautifully-wrought, with acidity that carves a path through tasty red berry flavors and a haze of leafy-herbal notes; the spice element expands through the graphite-laden finish. Now through 2018 to 2020. Excellent. About $50.
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Youngberg Hill Natasha Pinot Noir 2011, Willamette valley. 11.5% alc. Entrancing transparent 13_NatashaPinotNoir-300x210ruby hue; first come earth and leather, loam and briers, presaging a pinot noir focused on structure; smolders with smoke and graphite, buoying ripe, dark and spicy red cherries and raspberries, permeated by dried sage and heather; the texture is silky, lithe, spare; acidity cuts a path through the foresty-underbrush elements; a few minutes in the glass unfold whiffs of tobacco and cigarette paper. Now through 2017 to ’19. Excellent. About $50.
As you can see, these label images are for later vintages of the wines mentioned here.
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The Foris Vineyard Pinot Gris 2014, Southern Oregon, might be exactly the wine you’re looking 88014 14 FB_15377_Prooffor in terms of freshness and immediate appeal and in the realm of price. Great as an aperitif or with — in my recent experience — moderately spicy Chinese stir-fry, the wine displays a light straw-gold color with a pale green tinge and lovely aromas of green apple and pear, a wisp of grapefruit and deeper tones of quince and mango; a few minutes in the glass bring out notes of heather, honeysuckle and lilac. The attractive texture has a pleasing talc-like feeling on the palate, as well as crisp acidity and a touch of limestone in the finish, all at the service of tasty yellow stone-fruit flavors. 13.9 percent alcohol. An uncomplicated but luminous, crystalline wine, fashioned by Foris winemaker Bryan Wilson. Now through the end of 2016. Very Good+. About $14. A local purchase; I paid $13.

The Southern Oregon AVA is about as large as its name implies, encompassing a hair over 2 million acres in the southwest part of the state. While the typical direction is for the TTB to approve smaller entities within larger AVAs, the reverse movement occurred in 2004, when Southern Oregon was approved to include the Rogue Valley and Umpqua Valley AVAs and several sub-AVAs within them.

When Dick and Nancy Ponzi founded Ponzi Vineyards in 1970, they were pioneers in Oregon’s Willamette Valley, Wines_Images1along with such legendary figures as Dick Erath and David Lett. Today, with their daughter Luisa Ponzi as winemaker and daughter Maria as president, the winery continues to grow and thrive as one of the state’s venerable institutions. Our Wine of the Day is the Ponzi Pinot Noir 2013, Willamette Valley, the grapes for which derive from a number of estate vineyards. The wine aged 11 months in French oak, 35 percent new barrels, and was gravity-bottled unfined and unfiltered. The color is a beguiling transparent medium ruby; first, the wine expresses its earthiness in a welter of dust, loam and graphite that opens to notes of ripe black and red currants and cherries inflected with hints of sassafras and cloves, pomegranate and cranberry. Boy, this is a supple, lithe and satiny pinot noir that flows like money across the palate, but that’s not all the tale; its seductive texture is buoyed by swingeing acidity and a scintillating mineral element that builds layers of graphite and flint until the wine feels as if it had been chiseled from obsidian, and I mean that in the most positive manner. Even as it feels more deeply rooted in the earth through the finish, the wine somehow increases the heady floral and dried spice aura of its bouquet. 13.2 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2020 to ’23 with roasted chicken or game birds. Excellent. About $40.

A sample for review.

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