Italy


The experience at VINO 2015 — as at VINO 2011, the last time the event was held in New York — is overwhelming. Again, the three-day conference about Italian wine and the Italian wine industry and their relationship with America occurred (last week) at the venerable Waldorf Astoria hotel, and though my room this year was not as grand as my accommodations were four years ago — not, I hope, a reflection of any diminishing of my status — the hotel is a sumptuous place that certainly fulfills any expectations for service. (In fact, the Waldorf is so exclusive that to eat breakfast in Peacock Alley, just off the ornate lobby, you have to reserve a table and wear a dark business suit.) It’s pretty interesting and even gratifying to mingle with (or observe from a distance) some of the great figures in wine education and authorship, people who wrote some of the definitive and best-known books in the business, including Karen MacNeil, Ed McCarthy, Harriet Lembeck, Kevin Zraly, Terry Robarts, Elin McCoy and others. It’s also a treat to hobnob with a host of my blogging compatriots, exchanging notes and thoughts.

To a significant extent, the conference is about selling wine or figuring out how to sell wine, so most of the attendees come from the wholesale tier of the industry, and their presence tips the focus toward getting wine to the market and in the hands of consumers. For example, a seminar about the wines of Calabria given by an author and educator emphasized the land and region, the characteristics of the grapes and the details about the wines, while a seminar on the wines of the Campania region given by an expert in Italian wines at the retail level was mostly about how to sell the wines and explain them to customers.

The overwhelming part consists of the sheer numbers of estates, producers and cooperatives offering wine to taste — according to the Italian Trade Commission, 350 producers and more than 1,200 wines. In addition, Slow Wine, an adjunct of the Slow Food organization, mounted its own, smaller and very select tasting of wines from producers featured in their wine guide. There’s no way that one sane healthy person could taste even a fraction of that vinous flood, so as I mentioned in a previous post, I tried to be judicious and pick producers carefully or, to be honest, on a whim. It’s surprising how often that rather antimethodical method works out, especially among the producers that do not have representation in the United States. Of course when the opportunity arose, I didn’t hesitate to taste the wines of prestigious estates too.

Today, I launch a series devoted to the wines I encountered at VINO 2015, beginning with four producers, from the Slow Wine tasting, that do not have representation in this country. Listen up, importers!

Postcard image of the Waldorf Astoria from vanartgallery.bc.ca.
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Tenuta Terraviva lies close to the coastal town of Tortoreto in the region of Abruzzo. The organic estate produces small quantities of white and red wine from local grapes such as trebbiano, pecorino and montepulciano, employing thoughtful application of wood and steel to craft delicious, lively and charming wines with a slightly serious edge and surprising complexity. Alcohol content stays consistently in the 13 to 13.5 percent range. I tried the sleek, spicy, lightly honeyed and blossomy Terraviva Trebbiano 2013, the winery’s entry-level white, made in stainless steel; another trebbiano, Mario’s 40 2012, which undergoes 12 months in large oak barrels and six months in steel tanks, lending notes of spiced pear, candied grapefruit and almond flower (about 415 cases); the intriguing ‘Ekwo 2013, Abruzzo Pecorino, made in stainless steel and offering distinct hints of heather, yellow plums, mango and lime peel (about 335 cases); and for red, the Lui 2011, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, aged half in used barriques and half in steel tanks, for a feral and woodsy effect of wild cherries and raspberries, dried mountain herbs and leather, with real dusty tannic grip (about 1,650 cases; alcohol content 14 percent). Tenuta Terraviva is looking for an American importer, and we would all be happy if one were found. At the current conversion rate of euros to dollars, the Trebbiano 2013 is priced at about $10.25, while Mario’s 40 2012 is about $13.50. Even after the costs of importation and the three-tier system, these would be attractive and reasonably priced wines.
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Villa Venti is located about 30 kilometers directly west of the sea-coast resort city of Rimini, in the extreme southeastern corner of Emilia-Romagna. Boasting bed and breakfast lodging and a farm for demonstrating organic and biodynamic methods, the estate is operated by the Castellucci, Giardini and Riva families. I tried two of their wines, the exotic Serenaro 2013, Forli Bianco IGT, made from the very local famoso di Cesena grape, and the appealing and enticing Primo Segno 2012, Romagna Sangiovese Superiore, as well as the version from 2011. This red wine, which sees no oak, is deceptively light, with floral and spicy fragrances that seem to nourish the soul, very pretty red cherry and raspberry fruit, bracing acidity and a surprising amount of supple loamy tannins; that’s the 2012; the ’11 offers even more burnish, depth and purchase. It made me long for a dish of pappardelle with rabbit or a selection of salumi and cheeses. In Italy, this stylish wine costs about 10 euros.
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The founding of Torre San Martino began with the discovery, in 2000, of sangiovese vines dating back to 1922. The estate occupies 70 hectares — about 173 acres — in the central Appennines of the area called Tosco-Romagnola; we’re still in Emilia-Romagna but in the far west. The stunning young woman who poured the wines of Torre San Martino supplied me with a sleekly designed brochure, all black, white and gray, but it offered no technical information about the products, and the estate’s website is “Under Construction,” so I can deliver no technical data about how these wines were made, though someone is doing something right. The intriguing white entry, the Vigna della Signora 2013, Colli di Faenza Bianco, is a blend of chardonnay, sauvignon blanc and albana grapes, the latter an indigenous vine that does not get much love, despite its DOCG status. In combination, though, with unspecified amounts of chardonnay and sauvignon blanc, it produces a wine that seems pure gold, from its brilliant straw-gold hue to its notes of yellow fruit and flowers, spiced pears and caramelized grapefruit and orange zest, and a texture poised between pert acidity and moderate lushness. The Vigna 1922 Riserva 2011, Sangiovese di Romagna, is made exclusively from those 93-year-old vines; it’s a wine of great elegance and breeding, intensity and depth, displaying a sense of history and geography, and if you could not sell the hell out of it in restaurants in New York, Chicago, San Francisco and L.A. then you would need to get a job cleaning milk shake machines. The Gemme 2013, Sangiovese di Romagna Superiore, is a younger wine in every way, fresh and amenable but with plenty of stuffing. These are sophisticated wines that embody high-design components and an interesting narrative; how could they not find an American importer?
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I was terrifically impressed by the wines of Ronco del Gelso, an estate located in the Isonzo DOC of Friuli Venezia Giulia, in northeastern Italy. Mainly white wines are produced here, with a few reds, and these white wines are notably fresh, clean, crisp and spicy, as in the instance of the Toc Bas 2013, made from friulano grapes. More layered is the Sot lis Rives 2013, a barrel-aged pinot grigio that employs crystalline limestone qualities and vivacious acidity to cushion tasty peach, lime and grapefruit flavors, with hints of hazelnuts and almond blossom. The Siet Vignis Chardonnay 2013 aged a year in 2,500-liter oak barrels, lending the wine lovely subtlety and suppleness, while retaining well-defined mineral elements and delicious citrus and stone-fruit flavors. Best of these, however, is Ronco del Gelso’s Schulz Riesling 2013, a captivating and winsome wine made all in stainless steel, resting on the lees with no malolactic fermentation; the result is a beautifully balanced amalgam of peach, pear, lychee, jasmine and limestone that’s slightly sweet on the entry but very dry on the finish and exhibiting all the verve and energy you want in a great riesling.
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The way I tasted wine yesterday and will for the next two days is not the best way to taste wine. What’s the best way? At dinner at home with LL and a bottle of wine that tastes great with the food we cooked. The next best way is to stand in the kitchen with a few bottles and spend time with them, going back over them for an hour or two and trying them from the different perspectives that a little air lends, and perhaps knocking a stopper in the bottle and trying them the next day. Also a good way to taste wine is at the property where it was produced or in the vineyard whence it sprang forth, bearing the influence of the soil in which the vines are rooted and the weather that passed over the vineyard, feeling it all there.

Not the best way to taste wine or at least not the best way to taste wine seriously and take competent notes is at a mass trade event. At VINO 2015 — and believe me, I’m happy to be here in New York City — the organizers have gathered some 350 producers from Italy, as well as a major side event hosted by Slow Wine. In all, there are about 1,200 wines to taste. Rows of tables are set up with narrow aisles between them, so the hundreds of retailers, wholesalers and writers in attendance are jostling each other for space at the most desirable spaces at the same time as they are tasting wine, spitting into the buckets provided there, chatting up their friends or the winemakers or their representatives. The situation is, in short, a circus, and one tends to wander around, glassy-eyed, wondering who to approach and what wines to taste.

I tend to ignore the popular tables where people are crowded around three or four deep and go for the tables where no one is tasting, where the winemakers or producers look a little lonely and uncomfortable. That’s the way to make discoveries, as I did several times yesterday afternoon. I divided my time between Italian producers that do not have representation in the United States and some that do, and I’ll say right now that the wines I tasted from the wineries that have no importer certainly deserve to have their products known in this country. I would rather have tried any of these wines in Italy, walking through the vineyards, tasting with a simple meal at the winery. However, these are the circumstances in which I find myself, and I’m grateful to be at VINO 2015 and discover, at least for myself, such wineries and estates as Torre di San Martino, Ronco del Gelso, Pasetti, Al-Cantara and Crissante.

Today, I will attend guided tastings of wines from Campania and Calabria and throw myself again into the chaos of the big tastings. More wine is waiting to be discovered.

Longtime readers of this blog — bless your tiny pointed heads and may your tribes increase! — know that a great deal of effort goes into the annual “12 Days of Christmas with Champagne and Sparkling Wine” series, but as encompassing as that sequence is, it cannot include all the Champagnes and sparkling wines that I taste from late November through early January. For this edition of Weekend Wine Notes, therefore, I offer an eclectic roster of nine of such products, one from Champagne, a duo from Franciacorta in Lombardy and a Lambrusco, an unusual darker-than-a-rosé sparkler from the far western Loire Valley, and versions from California and Oregon. I deliver as much technical information as might actually be required but concentrate on the essence of the blitzkrieg review: short, incisive and to-the-point. With one exception, these wines were samples for review. Enjoy!
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Antica Fratta Essence Brut 2007, Franciacorta, Lombardy, Italy. 13% alc. 90% chardonnay, 10% pinot noir. A favorite of ours for two Yuletide seasons. Light gold color; a seething horde of tiny bubbles; another year has burnished this sparkling wine; a little spicier, a bit toastier than it was at the previous tasting; roasted lemon and lemon balm, spiced pear; lightly buttered cinnamon toast; keen acidity and a honed limestone element; delicious, with appealing generosity but also a serious edge. Excellent. About $35.
Imported by Masciarelli Wine co., Weymouth, Mass.
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Argyle Brut 2011, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 12.5% alc. 60% pinot noir, 40% chardonnay. Pale gold gold, animated by a shimmer of tiny bubbles; a finely meshed construct of delicate details: lemon balm, verbena and lemon curd, a touch of orange rind; candied quince and ginger and a note of cloves; hint of biscuit; quite dry, bright acidity, lots of flint and limestone; very steely, very steady. Lovely. Excellent. About $27.
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Bonny Doon Sparkling Syrah 2011, Central Coast. 13.8% alc., according to the label, 11.9% alc. says the winery website. 83% syrah, 17% grenache. 378 cases. Opaque purple-black with a violet cast; moderately fizzy; the roasted, meaty and fleshy aspect we expect from syrah, but with vivid elements of deeply spiced and macerated strawberries and raspberries; a high balsamic note; burgeoning hints of violets and lavender; strangely attractive yet very intense, almost demanding, in fact too intense to use as an aperitif; this definitely needs food. Very Good+. About $36, intended for the winery’s club members.
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Cleto Chiarli e Figli Vecchia Modena Premier 2013, Lambrusco di Sorbara Secco, Italy. 11% alc. 100% lambrusco di Sorbara grapes. Bright medium ruby-red cherry hue; definitely and pleasantly effervescent; raspberries, red and black currants; slightly earthy with heather and boxwood; swashbuckling acidity keeps the whole dark, savory package lively and quenching, while a hint of tannin lends body; appealing supple texture balances a touch of dry austerity on the finish. Classic with rabbit pasta, terrines, duck. Very Good+. About $ .
Imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif.
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Contadi Castaldi Brut Rosé 2008, Franciacorta, Lombardy. 15.5% alc. 80% pinot noir, 20% chardonnay. Pale salmon/onion skin hue; quite effervescent; fresh raspberries and strawberries with hints of rose petals and lilac; freshly baked bread, cloves, anise, orange zest; elegant and ethereal; limestone and almond skin on the finish; lovely texture and structure. Very Good+. About $21
Imported by TMT USA, San Antonio, Texas. Image from altissimocento.net.
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Emma 2013, Vin de France. 9% alc. A blend of gamay and grolleau gris grapes, produced by Domaine de la Coche. The Vin de France classification was created in 2009 and allows winemakers to blend grapes and wines from across France, not just those dictated by their appellation. Domaine de la Coche is an organic estate located in the Pays de Retz that lies south of the Loire estuary and north of the Breton marshlands. Bright purple-magenta hue; gently effervescent, just tickles your nose; rose petals and violets, blueberries and raspberries, surprisingly earthy; detectably sweet initially but segues to dry from mid-palate back; a little dusty and raspy but mainly delightful. Very Good+. About $24, an online purchase.
Imported by Fruit of the Vine, Long Island City, N.Y. I think that Emma needs a label makeover.
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Evolution Sparkling Wine nv, America. Produced by Sokol Blosser Winery. 12.5% alc. A proprietary blend of semillon, riesling, muller thurgau, pinot gris, gewurztraminer, muscat, chardonnay. Sokol Blosser, founded in Oregon’s Willamette Valley in 1971, delivered a real hit with its non-vintage Evolution White, now in its 18th “edition.” This sparkling wine, now debuting and made from the same grape varieties in Washington state, seemed like a natural development. It’s essentially a Prosecco-like sparkling wine made in the champagne method of second fermentation in the bottle. Pale gold color; a tidy splurge of tiny bubbles; apples and lemons, a lot of flowers from the muscat and gewurztraminer, it seems, as well as a hint of muscat funkiness; detectably sweet on the entry but slides toward dryness on the finish; fortunately clean acidity and a hint of limestone keep it honest. Very Good. About $22.
Image from urbanblisslife.com.
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Jacquard Brut Rosé nv, Champagne. 12.5% alc. 53% pinot noir, 35% chardonnay, 12% pinot meunier. Enchanting pale copper-salmon color; a tempest of tiny swirling bubbles; wild strawberries and cherries with a hint of red currants, touches of peach and orange zest; biscuits and cinnamon toast; quince and crystallized ginger; delicate, elegant, an ethereal construct buoyed by crisp acidity and a scintillating limestone quality; a finish half chiseled/half softly appealing. Really lovely. Excellent. About $55.
JAD Imports, Manhasset, N.Y.
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Schramsberg Crémant Demi-Sec 2010, North Coast. 13.5% alc. 88% flora grapes, 11% chardonnay, 1% pinot noir. 96% Napa County, 2.5% Mendocino, 1.5% Sonoma, 1% Marin. The flora grape is a cross of semillon and gewurztraminer developed of UC-Davis. Very pale gold hue; a gentle tug of finely-wrought bubbles; lemon balm, spiced pear and a touch of peach; jasmine and camellia; not so much sweet as ripe, soft and cloud-like; the floral and slightly nutty elements burgeon as the limestone character digs deeper, creating attractive tension even as the wine feels integrated and harmonious. Drink with the most simple desserts, nothing flamboyant; a sugar cookie or biscotti, a fruit tart, light cakes. Excellent. About $39.
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I was jesting a few days ago when I posted my “50 Great Wines of 2014″ and urged people to get their shopping lists ready. Obviously not many consumers are going to make note of a hundred-dollar cabernet sauvignon or a strictly limited, hard to find grenache gris. Here, though, is the roster that you’ve been waiting for, the “25 Great Wine Bargains of 2014,” a list of fairly widely available, well-made wines that will not but a strain on your budget. You will notice that a wine doesn’t have to be expensive to earn an Excellent rating. Seventeen of these products, priced from $10 to $20 have Excellent ratings; the rest are Very Good+. Not a one would you regret buying, some of them by the case. Now that fact that a number of these wines are from 2011 and 2012 means that they probably ought to be consumed quickly, especially the white wines and rosés; most of the reds can go for a year or two. The point is that these are terrific over-achieving wines that offer more personality and complexity than their prices might imply. The order is descending cost. Enjoy!

These wines were samples for review. This post is the seventh of 2015 on BTYH.
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Robert Mondavi Fumé Blanc 2013, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $20.
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Joseph Cattin “Brut Cattin” Crémant d’Alsace, France. Variable blend of pinot blanc, pinot gris, riesling and chardonnay. Excellent. About $19.
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Nieto Senetier Nicanor Blend 2011, Mendoza, Argentina. 34 percent cabernet sauvignon, 33 percent malbec, 33 percent merlot. Excellent. About $19.
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Bodegas Hidalgo La Gitana Manzanilla Sherry, nv, Sanlucar de Barrameda, Spain. Excellent. About $18.
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McCay Cellars Rosé 2013, Lodi. Old vine carignane with some grenache. Production was 253 cases. Excellent. About $18.
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Wairau River Sauvignon Blanc 2013, Marlborough, New Zealand. Excellent. About $18.
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Jean Ginglinger Cuvée George Pinot Blanc 2011, Alsace, France. Excellent. About $17.
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Livon Pinot Grigio 2013, Collio, Italy. Excellent. About $17.
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J Pinot Gris 2013, California. Excellent. About $16.
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Prazo de Roriz 2010, Douro, Portugal. Tinta barroca 37%, “old vines” 18%, touriga nacional 16%, touriga franca 15%, tinta amarela 7%, tinta cao 7%. Excellent. About $16.
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Alois Lageder Pinot Grigio 2012, Dolomiti, Italy. Excellent. About $15.
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CVNE Monopole 2013, Rioja Blanco, Spain. 100 percent viura grapes. Very Good+ verging on Excellent. About $15.
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Fratelli Chianti 2011, Toscana, Italy. 100% sangiovese. Very Good+. About $15.
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Domaine Les Aphillanthes Rosé 2013, Côtes du Rhône, France. Cinsault, grenache, counoise, mourvèdre. Excellent. About $14.
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Mulderbosch Chenin Blanc 2011, Western Cape, South Africa. Excellent. About $14.
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Dry Creek Fumé Blanc 2013, Sonoma County. Very Good+. About $14.
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Palacios de Bornos Verdejo 2013, Rueda, Spain. 100 percent verdejo grapes. Excellent. About $14.
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Stemmari Dalila 2012, Bianco Terre Siciliane, Italy. 80 percent grillo grapes, 20 percent viognier, Excellent. About $14.
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Wolfberger Pinot Blanc 2013, Alsace, France. Excellent. About $14.
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Aia Vecchia Vermentino 2013, Toscana, Italy. With 5 percent viognier grapes. Very Good+. About $12.
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Pedroncelli Signature Selection Dry Rosé of Zinfandel 2012, Dry Creek Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $12.
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Li Veli Passamante 2012, Salice Salentino, Italy. 100% negroamaro grapes. Very Good+. About $12.
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Trim Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, California. With 15 percent merlot, 3 percent malbec. Very Good+. About $11.
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Mandolin Chardonnay 2012, Monterey County. Very Good+. About $10.
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Tres Ojos Garnacha 2011, Calatayud, Spain. 85 percent grenache, 7 percent each cabernet sauvignon and tempranillo, 1 percent syrah. Very Good+. About $10.
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Unbate your breath, My Readers, today I present the annual “50 Great Wines” entry, this edition for 2014. I posted to BiggerThanYourHead 135 times in 2014 and reviewed 582 wines. These 50 Great Wines represent 8.6 percent of the wines I reviewed last year. How do I choose the 50 wines for this honor? First, any wine that I rated Exceptional automatically gets a berth in the roster. After that, the selection process involves going back over every post, looking at the reviews of the wines that received an Excellent rating, reading the notes again and looking for the words or phrases signifying that I felt a wine was exciting, provocative, intriguing, highly individual. You can be sure that this list probably isn’t definitive; how could such a selection of wines be? I cut from the field many wines that could easily have been included, but the limit is 50 and they had to be sacrificed. Even as I clicked on the “Publish” button on WordPress I thought, “Oh no, how could I leave out ……?”

Going through these wines, many of My Readers may cry “Foul!” because some of them were produced in severely limited quantities, but that’s often the case with great wines. Think of the situation as a challenge wherein you face a sort of scavenger hunt in tracking such wines down. Some of these wines were made by well-known winemakers for prominent wineries or estates; others are far more obscure, but I enjoy bringing attention to young, small, family-owned and -operated properties that otherwise might not receive the exposure they deserve. The usual suspect grapes are included, of course — chardonnay and sauvignon blanc, cabernet sauvignon and pinot noir — but you will also find on this list proponents of trousseau gris and grenache gris, carignane and cinsault, crafted by brave pioneers of the unusual, even rare grapes. With one exception — the Dolce 2005 — these products are the current releases from their wineries, or close to it. I think all of them were samples for review or were tasted at the property. I hope this list of 50 Great Wines inspires you to look for the ones that capture your interest and to try wines you never encountered before. Prices, by the way, range from about $22 to $120. Coming in a few days will be my annual list of 25 Great Bargain Wines $20 and Under.
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Amapola Creek Cabernet Sauvignon 2009, Sonoma Valley. With 7 percent petit verdot. 1,475 cases. Exceptional. About $70.
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Anakota Helena Montana Vineyard Elevation 950 Feet Cabernet Sauvignon 2009, Knights Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $75.
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Animo Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Napa Valley. With 17 percent petit verdot. From Michael Mondavi. Excellent. About $85.
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d’Arenberg The Other Side Shiraz 2010, McLaren Vale, Australia. 14% alc. 96-year-old vines. 200 six-pack cases. Exceptional. About $85.
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d’Arenberg Tyche’s Mustard Shiraz 2010, McLaren Vale, Australia. 14% alc. 200 six-pack cases. Exceptional. About $85.
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Battenfeld Spanier Mölsheim Riesling 2012, Rheinhessen, Germany. Exceptional. About $23.
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Blair Estate Pinot Noir 2010, Arroyo Seco, Monterey County. 481 cases. Excellent. About $35.
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Bonny Doon Le Cigare Blanc 2013, Arroyo Seco, Monterey County. 55% roussanne, 26% grenache blanc, 19% picpoul. 1,965 cases. Exceptional. About $28.
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Bonny Doon Cuvée R Grenache 2012, Monterey County. 593 cases. Excellent. About $48.
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Cade Sauvignon Blanc 2013, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $28.
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Catena Zapata White Bones Chardonnay 2010, Mendoza, Argentina. Exceptional. About $120.
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Cenyth 2009, Sonoma County. 14.5% alc. 47% cabernet sauvignon, 28% merlot, 10% cabernet franc, 8% petit verdot, 7% malbec. The debut release from this collaboration between Julia Jackson, daughter of the late Jess Jackson and his wife Barbara Banke, and Helene Seillan, daughter of Pierre Seillan, winemaker of Verité. Exceptional. About $60.
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Chêne Bleu Aliot 2010, Vin de Pays du Vaucluse, France. 65 percent roussanne, 30 percent grenache blanc, 5 percent marsanne and some smidgeon of viognier. Exceptional. About $85.
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Clos Saron Out of the Blue, 2013, Sierra Foothills. 90 percent cinsault, 5 percent syrah, 5 percent graciano. (The cinsault vines planted in 1885.) 170 cases. Excellent. About $30.
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Cornerstone Cellars Howell Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Napa Valley. 14.7% alc. With 10% merlot. 470 cases. Exceptional. About $80.
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Cornerstone Cellars Sauvignon Blanc 2011, Napa Valley. 361 cases. Exceptional. About $30.
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Dolce 2005, Napa Valley. 90 percent semillon, 10 percent sauvignon blanc. A majestic dessert wine. Exceptional. About $85 for a half-bottle.
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Elena Walch Kastelaz Gewürztraminer 2012, Alto Adige, Italy. Exceptional. About $32.
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The Eyrie Vineyards Original Vines Reserve Pinot Gris 2012, Dundee Hills, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 261 cases. Exceptional. About $33.
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FEL Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County. Excellent. About $38.
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Fields Family Wines Old Vine Zinfandel 2011, Mokelumne River, Lodi. 200 cases. Excellent. About $24.
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Gallegos Boekenoogen Vineyard Pinot Noir 2012, Santa Lucia Highlands, Monterey County. 250 cases. Excellent. About $42.
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Grgich Hills Estate Fume Blanc 2012, Napa Valley. Exceptional. About $30.
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Idlewild Grenache Gris 2013, Mendocino County. 230 cases. Excellent. About $22.
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Inama Vigneto du Lot 2011, Soave Classico, Italy. Excellent. About $30.
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Inman Family “Endless Crush” Rosé of Pinot Noir 2013, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. Exceptional. About $25.
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Inwood Estates Vineyards Chardonnay 2012, Dallas County, Texas. Excellent. About $40.
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J. Christopher Wines Lumière Pinot Noir 2011, Eola-Amity Hills, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 756 cases. Excellent. About $35.
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J. Davies Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Diamond Mountain District, Napa Valley. With nine percent malbec. Exceptional. About $90.
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Tenutae Lageder Porer Pinot Grigio 2012, Sudtirol, Alto adige, Italy. Excellent. About $25.
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McCay Cellars Carignane 2011, Lodi, 218 cases. Excellent. About $32.
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Newton “The Puzzle” 2010, Spring Mountain District, Napa Valley. This proprietary wine is a blend of 60 percent cabernet sauvignon grapes, 18 percent each cabernet franc and petit verdot and 4 percent malbec. Exceptional. About $100.
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Paul Hobbs Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Napa Valley. With 3 percent petit verdot, 1 percent each malbec and cabernet franc. Excellent. About $100.
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Pfendler Pinot Noir 2012, Sonoma Coast. 14.4% alc. 230 cases. Exceptional. About $45.
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Phifer Pavitt Date Night Sauvignon Blanc 2013, Napa Valley. 14.5% alc. 588 cases. Exceptional. About $30.
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La Pitchoune Pinot Noir 2012, Sonoma Coast. 279 cases. Exceptional. About $60.
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Pittnauer Rosenberg St. Laurent 2010, Burgenland, Austria. Excellent. About $27.
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Quinta do Vallado 20 Years Old Tawny Porto. 83 cases. Exceptional. About $80 for a 500-milliliter bottle..
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Respite Reichel Vineyard Indulgence 2010, Alexander valley, Sonoma County. A proprietary blend of 65 percent cabernet sauvignon, 22 percent malbec and 13 percent cabernet franc. 77 cases. Exceptional. About $75.
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La Rochelle Dutton Ranch Pinot Noir 2010. Russian River Valley. 14.2% alc. 429 six-pack cases. Exceptional. About $48.
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Smith-Madrone Cabernet Sauvignon 2009, Spring Mountain District, Napa Valley. 1,302 cases. Excellent. About $45.
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Steven Kent Winery Merrellie Chardonnay 2012, Livermore Valley. 504 cases. Excellent. About $34.
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Three Sticks Durell Vineyard Origin Chardonnay 2012, Sonoma Valley. 266 cases. Exceptional. About $48.
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Three Sticks Durell Vineyard Pinot Noir 2011, Sonoma Coast. 170 cases. Exceptional. About $65.
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Tin Barn Coryelle Fields Syrah 2009, Sonoma Coast. 123 cases. Excellent. About $25.
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Two Shepherds Trousseau Gris 2012, Fanucchi Vineyard, Russian River Valley. 25 cases. Exceptional. About $25.
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VML Blanc de Noirs 2010, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $50.
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Volta Cabernet Sauvignon 2009, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $60.
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Wakefield St. Andrews Single Vineyard Release Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Clare Valley, Australia. 250 cases imported. Excellent. About $60.
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Weltner Rödelseer Küchenmeister Trocken Sylvaner 2012, Franken, Germany. Excellent. About $27.
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On the First Day of Christmas, we did a vintage Champagne; yesterday, it was a fine sparkling wine from Oregon. Today, in our search for diversity, we travel to Trentino in northeastern Italy. Trentino is the southern half of the Trentino-Alto Adige region, of which, naturally, Alto-Adige (or South Tyrol) is the northern half. Got that? Northern Italy, generally, produces many versions of sparkling wines, both in the champagne method, like Franciacorta in Lombardy, and in the bulk or Charmat process, as in Prosecco, from the Veneto. Today’s example is the Ferrari Perlé 2007, Trento, a champagne method 100 percent chardonnay sparkling wine — therefore a blanc de blancs — that matures for about five years in the bottle on its yeast cells. The company was founded in 1902 and is operated by the fourth generation of the Lunelli family. The chardonnay grapes for this elegant and powerful sparkling wine derived from vineyards ranging from 985 to 2,300 feet in elevation on the Alpine slopes. Ferrari Perlé 2007 offers a medium gold color and a surging torrent of tiny bubbles; the bouquet teems with notes of freshly-baked bread, spiced pear and guava, with back-tones of quince and ginger and slightly caramelized cinnamon toast, all supported by a notable element of chalk and limestone. Full-bodied and full-hearted, this supple and lithe sparkling wine is vigorous and dynamic, quite dry yet threaded with hints of pear and green apple and a touch of almond skin and grapefruit rind; mainly though, its purpose in life belongs to vast, scintillating limestone and flint minerality. Still, there’s a quality of overarching delicacy and winsomeness in the finish. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drink through 2017 to 2020. Excellent. About $35.

Imported by Palm Bay International, Boca Raton, Fla. A sample for review. Image from italiaatavola.net.

So, My Readers, it’s Christmas Eve 2014, and tomorrow, not to belabor the obvious, is Christmas Day, the occasion on which I will launch the Eighth Edition of my series “Twelve Days of Christmas with Champagne and Sparking Wine.” I thought it would be informative, instructive and even wildly (or mildly) amusing to commemorate today the previous seven lists in the series (but not the actual reviews; you can find those through the handy and easy-to-use Search function). When I produced the first “Twelve Days,” during the 2007/2008 Yuletide season that runs from Christmas to Twelfth Night, I didn’t realize that it would turn into an annual event, but once I finished that initial effort, it seem logical and inevitable. While plenty of the usual suspects show up in the series, I tried to introduce My Readers to interesting Champagnes from small artisan houses as well as unusual sparkling wines from around the world. In 2008/2009, because of the burgeoning recession, I kept prices fairly low. In 2011/2012, every product was French because, well, it just worked out that way. Five years times 12 days would result in 60 wines, but I made it a practice to offer choices at different price points on New Year’s Eve and Twelfth Night in addition to sometimes pairing or tripling products that matched well; the result is that this series, so far, presented reviews of 132 Champagnes and sparkling wines. We’ll work backward from the most recent edition to the first segment of the series.
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2013/2014

Dec. 25, 2013, Christmas Day. Adriano Adami “Col Credas” Rive di Farra di Soligo Brut 2011, Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore. Excellent. About $22.

Dec. 26. Champagne Veuve Fourny & Fils Grande Réserve Premier Cru Brut. Excellent. About $50.

Dec. 27. Juvé y Camps “Reserva de la Familia” Brut Nature Gran Reserve 2008, Cava, Spain. Excellent, About $15 to $19.

Dec. 28. Champagne Moët & Chandon Grand Vintage Brut Rosé 2004. Excellent. About $80.

Dec. 29. Montenisa Franciacorta Brut. Excellent. About $35.

Dec. 30. Champagne Delamotte Blanc de Blancs Brut. Excellent. About $50 to $55.

Dec. 31, New Year’s Eve. Gran Sarao Cava Brut. Very Good. About $10 to $16.
Klipfel Brut Cremant d’Alsace, Very Good+. About $16.
Argyle Knudsen Vineyard Julia Lee’s Block Blanc de Blancs Brut 2008, Dundee Hills, Oregon. Excellent. About $50;
Domaine Chandon Étoile Téte de Cuvée 2003, Napa County 52%, Sonoma County 48%. Exceptional. About $100.

Jan. 1, 2014, New Year’s Day. Laetitia Brut Rose 2009, Arroyo Grande Valley, San Luis Obispo County. Excellent, about $28.

Jan. 2. Champagne André Beaufort Grand Cru Brut Nature 2005. Excellent. About $130 (a local purchase).

Jan. 3. Chandon 40th Anniversary Cuvée Rosé, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $40.

Jan. 4. Antica Fratta Essence Brut 2007, Franciacorta, Italy. Excellent, about $32.

Jan. 5, Twelfth Night. Adriano Adami Bosco di Gica Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore. Very Good+. About $18.
Domaine Chandon Blanc de Noirs, California. Excellent. About $22.
Champagne Delamotte Brut. Excellent. About $45 to $50.
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2012/2013

Dec. 25, 2012, Christmas Day. Szigeti Grüner Veltliner Brut, Burgenland, Austria. Very Good+. About $19.

Dec. 26. Champagne Gosset Grand Blanc de Blancs Brut. Excellent. About $68.

(Dec. 27. Skipped. I have no idea why.)

Dec. 28. Champagne Besserat de Bellefon Cuvée des Moines Brut. Excellent. About $45 to $55.

Dec. 29. Champagne Françoise Bedel Entre Ciel et Terre Brut. Excellent. About $75.

Dec. 30. Mont-Ferrant CR20 Cava d’Aniversari per a Carme Ruscalleda 2006, Gran Reserva Extra Brut, Cava, Spain. Excellent. About $30.

Dec. 31, New Year’s Eve. Kenwood Yulupa Cuvée Brut, California. Very Good. About $9 to $12.
Gloria Ferrer Brut, Sonoma County. Very Good+. About $22.
Argyle Brut 2008, Willamette Valley, Oregon. Excellent. About $27.
Champagne Philippe Fontaine Brut Tradition. Very Good+. About $28.
Champagne David Léclapart L’Amateur Premier Cru Blanc de Blancs Extra Brut. Exceptional. About $83.

Jan. 1, 2013, New Year’s Day. J Vintage Brut 2005, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $48.
J Late Disgorged Vintage Brut 2003, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. Exceptional. About $90.

Jan. 2. Champagne Henriot Brut Souverain. Excellent. About $52.

Jan. 3. Champagne Fleury Brut Millésimé 1996. Excellent. About $90 to $100.

Jan. 4. Domaine Chandon Yountville Vintage Brut 2007, Yountville, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $45.
Domaine Chandon Mount Veeder Vintage Brut 2006, Mount Veeder, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $45.

Jan 5, Twelfth Night. Domaine Mittnacht Fréres Crémant d’Alsace. Very Good+. About $19 to $24.
Domaine Chandon Etoile Brut Rosé, North Coast. Excellent. About $50.
Champagne Franck Pascal Tolérance Brut Rosé. Excellent. About $55 to $65.
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2011/2012
Dec. 25, 2011. Christmas Day. Champalou Vouvray Brut. Excellent. About $19 to $26.

Dec. 26. Champagne Comte Audoin de Dampierre Brut Cuvée des Ambassadeurs. Excellent. About $36 to $50.

Dec. 27. Couly-Dutheil Brut de Franc, Loire Valley. Very Good+. About $21.

Dec. 28. Champagne Paul Bara Brut Réserve. Excellent. About $45 to $50.

Dec. 29. Gustave Lorentz Crémant d’Alsace. Excellent. About $26.

Dec. 30. Champagne Jean Vesselle Brut Réserve. Excellent. About $44.75

Dec. 31, New Year’s Eve. Simonnet-Febvre Brut Blanc, Crémant de Bourgogne, Very Good+. About $15-$19.
Champagne Perrier-Jouët Grand Brut, Excellent. About $45-$55.

Jan. 1, 2012, Domaine Achard-Vincent Clairette de Die Brut. Very Good. About $25.
André and Michel Quenard Savoie Brut, Very Good+. About $19-$25.

Jan. 2. Champagne Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Sublime Demi-Sec. Excellent. About $42.

Jan. 3. Champagne Michel Turgy Réserve Sélection Grand Cru Blanc de Blancs Brut. Excellent. About $52.

Jan. 4. Cuvée Stéphi Ebullience, Cremant de Limoux, Very Good+. About $20.

Jan 5, Twelfth Night. J.J. Vincent Crémant de Bourgogne. Very Good+. About $23.
Champagne Taittinger Prelude Brut. Excellent. About $90.
Champagne Perrier-Jouët Belle Epoque Brut. Excellent. About $140
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2010/2011

Dec. 25, 2012, Christmas Day. Schramsberg Blanc de Blancs Brut 2007, North Coast. Excellent. About $36.

Dec. 26. Lucien Albrecht Brut Rosé, Crémant d’Alsace. Very Good+. About $16-$20.

Dec. 27. Champagne Bollinger Special Cuvée Brut. Excellent. About $65.

Dec. 28. Vigne Regali Cuvée Aurora Rosé, Alta Langa, Piedmont. Excellent. About $30.

Dec. 29. Iron Horse Brut Rosé 2005, Green Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $50.

Dec. 30. Jaillance Brut Rosé, Crémant de Bordeaux. Very Good. About $17.
Chateau de Lisennes Brut, Crémant de Bordeaux. Very Good+. About $17.
Favory Brut, Crémant de Bordeaux. Excellent. About $16.50.

Dec. 31, New Year’s Eve. Segura Viudas Brut Reserva Cava, Spain. Very Good. About $10-$11.
Nino Franco Rustico Prosecco, Veneto, Italy, Very Good+. About $17-$20.
J Brut Rosé, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $35.
Champagne Rosé Premier Cru de Vve Fourny et Fils Vertus Brut. Excellent. About $55.

Jan. 1, 2011. Elyssian Gran Cuvée Brut, Spain. Very Good+. About $18.

Jan. 2. Graham Beck Brut; Graham Beck Brut Rosé, South Africa. Very+ for each. About $15-$18.

Jan. 3. Champagne Heidsieck & Co. Monopole “Blue Top” Brut. Excellent. About $35-$40.

Jan. 4. Domaine Carneros Brut Rosé 2006. Excellent. About $36.
Domaine Carneros Blanc de Noirs Brut 2006. Excellent. Available only at the winery.
Domaine Carneros Le Rêve Blanc de Blancs Brut 2004. Exceptional. About $85.

Jan. 5, Twelfth Night. Albinea Canali Ottocentonero, Lambrusco dell’Emilia. Very Good+. About $16.
Col Vetoraz Valdobbiadene Prosecco Brut. Very Good+. About $16.
Segura Viudas Brut Reserve Heredad Cava. Very Good+. About $15.
Paringa Sparkling Shiraz 2008, South Australia. Very Good+. About $10.
Lucien Albrecht Blanc de Blancs Brut, Cremant d’Alsace. Excellent. About $25.
Iron Horse Blanc de Blancs 2005, Green Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $40.
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2009/2010

Dec. 25, 2009, Christmas Day. Dopff & Irion Crémant d’Alsace Brut. Very Good+. About $20.

Dec. 26. Champagne Guy Charlemagne Reserve Brut Blanc de Blancs. Excellent. About $65.

Dec. 27. Domaine Carneros Cuvee de la Pompadour Brut Rosé. Excellent. About $36.

Dec. 28. Hill of Content Sparkling Red. Very Good+. About $15

Dec. 29. Champagne Henriot Brut Rosé. Excellent. About $55-$65.

Dec. 30. Scharffenberger Brut, Mendocino County. Very Good+. About $18

Dec. 31, New Year’s Eve. Louis Perdrier Brut, France. Good+. About $9.
Jean-Baptiste Adam Crémant d’Alsace Brut, Very Good+, about $20.
Champagne Lamiable Brut Grand Cru, Excellent, about $50-$60.

Jan. 1, 2010. Egly-Ouriet “Les Vignes de Vrigny” Premier Cru Brut. Excellent. About $70.

Jan. 2. Bortolomiol Prior Brut Valdobbiadene Prosecco, Veneto. Excellent. About $18.
Poema Cava Brut, Spain. Very Good+. About $13.
Finca La Linda Extra Brut, Argentina. Very Good+. about $15.

Jan. 3. Domaine du Closel Château des Vaults Brut Sauvage, Savennières, Loire Valley. Excellent. About $18.

Jan. 4. Champagne Haton & Fils Grand Reserve Brut, Excellent. About $55.
Haton et Fils Grand Reserve Blanc de Blancs Brut, Very Good+. About $55.
Haton & Fils “Cuvée René Haton” Premier Cru Blanc de Blancs Brut, Excellent. About $62.

Jan. 5, Twelfth Night. i Stefanini Spumante Brut, Very Good+. About $16.
Mumm Napa Cuvee M. Very Good+. About $20.
Bortolomiol Filanda Rosé Brut Riserva 2007, Veneto. Very Good+. About $22.
Champagne Guy Charlemagne Brut Extra. Excellent. About $62.
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2008/2009

Dec. 25, 2008, Christmas Day. Wolfberger Crémant d’Alsace Brut Rosé. Very Good+. About $22.

Dec. 26. Mirabelle Brut, North Coast, California. Very Good+. About $22.

Dec. 27. Greg Norman Estates Australian Sparkling Chardonnay Pinot Noir. Very Good+. About $18.

Dec. 28. Champagne A.R Lenoble Brut Nature. Excellent. About $35-$40.

Dec. 29. Patrick Bottex “La Cueille” Vin du Bugey-Cerdon. Very Good+. About $18-$24.

Dec. 30. J Cuvée 20 Brut, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $25-$28.

Dec. 31, New Year’s Eve. Domaine Laurier Brut, California, Very Good. About $12.
Rotari Rosé, Trento, Italy. Very Good+. About $14.
Champagne Taittinger Brut Millésimé 2002, Excellent. About $90.

Jan. 1, 2009. Champagne Roland Champion Blanc de Blancs Grand Cru Brut. Exceptional. About $65.

Jan. 2. Dom Bertiol Proseccco Veneto. Very Good. About $16.

Jan. 3. Charles Duret Crémant de Bourgogne. Very Good+. About $20.

Jan. 4. Champagne G.H. Mumm’s Carte Classique. Excellent. About $35.

Jan. 5, Twelfth Night. Marcato i Prandi Durello, Lessini, Veneto. Very Good. About $16.
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2007/2008
Dec. 25, 2007. Champagne Pol Roger Reserve Brut. Excellent. About $60-$65.

Dec. 26. Champagne Laurent-Perrier Brut L-P. Excellent. About $36-$45.

Dec. 27. Maschio dei Cavalieri Prosecco di Valdobbiabene Brut, Veneto. Very Good+. About $20.

Dec, 28. Champagne Chartogne-Taillet Brut Cuvée Sainte-Anne. Excellent. About $45.

Dec. 29. Champagne Bruno Paillard Rèserve Privée Blanc de Blancs. Excellent. About $60.

Dec, 30. Taltani Brut Taché, Australia, Very Good+. About $22.
Clover Hill Brut 2003, Tasmania. Excellent. About $32.

Dec. 31, New Year’s Eve. Gruet Brut, New Mexico, Very Good+. About $16.
Schramsberg J. Schram Brut 2000, North Coast. Excellent. About $90.
Champagne Veuve Clicquot Reserve Rosé, Excellent. About $70-$75.

Jan. 1, 2008. Champagne A. Margaine Premier Cru Brut, Excellent. About $45-$50.

Jan. 2. Champagne José Dhondt “Mes Vieilles Vignes” Grand Cru Blanc de Blancs Brut. Excellent. About $70.

Jan. 3. Champagne Gosset Brut Excellence. Excellent. About $46.

Jan. 4. Inniskillin Vidal Sparkling Ice Wine 2005, Niagara Peninsula, Canada. Excellent. About $85 for a half-bottle.

Jan. 5, Twelfth Night. Schramsberg Blanc de Blancs 2004, North Coast. Excellent. About $35.
Champagne Pierre Gimonnet & Fils Premier Cru Blanc de Blancs Brut. Excellent. About $45-$55.
Champagne Gosset Grande Reserve Brut. Excellent. About $63.
Champagne Bruno Paillard Premiere Cuvée Rosé Brut. Excellent. About $75.
Champagne Laurent-Perrier Cuvée Rosé Brut. Excellent. About $80.
Laurent-Perrier Grand Siècle Brut. Exceptional. About $110.
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In the heart of eastern Umbria, lying in a vast bowl-shaped valley of the Apennine range, are the vineyards that harbor the indigenous red sagrantino grape. These vineyards surround the hill-town of Montefalco, one of the smallest and most charming of all of Italy’s quaint and charming hill-towns, population 5,702 (in 2007). Sagrantino has been grown here for a thousand years, used by monks for making sacramental wine — hence sagrantino. The grape possesses the thickest skin of any grape devoted to table wine and was out of favor for a great deal of the 20th century because of its reputation — well-earned — for producing hard, tannic, austere wines that would not be ready to drink for decades. The 1970s brought a revival, however, with more knowledgeable and slightly gently vinification making slightly more amenable wines, but no mistake, Sagrantino di Montefalco, now more often called Montefalco Sagrantino, is no babe-in-arms. Italian wine law dictates that the wine, consisting of 100 percent sagrantino grapes, must age 30 months before release, in some combination or sequence of oak barrels (one year required), concrete vats and bottle. The size and composition of barrels is the choice of the producer; many still lean toward the traditional large Slovenian oak casks, but as in much else of Italy, the small French barrique has made inroads.

I first encountered Sagrantino di Montefalco on a vacation to Umbria in 1996. The friends we were sojourning with near Todi suggested a day-trip to this medieval hill village in the commune of Perugia, where we would find interesting wines and a good restaurant. The town was exceptionally sweet and historic, the restaurant was indeed good, and the wines were more than interesting. They were, actually, brooding, feral, ferrous and sanguinary, meaty, deeply fruity with a tinge of black cherry and balsalm and, yes, quite dense and tannic. We bought several bottles and took them home on the airplane; remember those days?

It’s difficult to make a living from wines that consumers can’t drink for 10 or 15 years — see Brunello di Montalcino — so the powers that be in Montefalco concocted a Rosso version of the wine, but instead of simply being a cadet rendition — see Brunello di Montalcino — the Montefalco Rosso uses the region’s principle grape in a minority status. The rules for Montefalco Rosso are 60 to 70 percent sangiovese, borrowing from neighboring Tuscany, with 10 to 15 percent sagrantino and the rest red grapes of the producer’s choice, usually merlot and/or cabernet sauvignon. The wine must age 18 months in barrel, vat or bottle, meaning typically a year in oak and four to six months in bottle. More accessible, perhaps, but still a potentially formidable wine.

Today I offer brief reviews of four examples of Montefalco Sagrantino and four of Montefalco Rosso. These were sampled in what’s called a virtual tasting, me (and others) at home with the wines, connected on the Internet with the producers who were on camera in Italy. We tasters submitted questions and comments via Twitter. I have included what technical information is available.

Image of the Montefalco piazza from trekearth.com.
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Montefalco Rosso:
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Antonelli Montefalco Rosso 2010. 14% alc. 70% sangiovese, 15% sagrantino, 15% merlot. Nine months in 25-hectoliter (660-gallon) casks; three months in cement vats. Medium ruby color with a garnet rim; cloves and nutmeg, macerated red and black fruit; leather, smoke, oolong tea; dried fruit and flowers; slightly exotic, quite earthy; swingeing acidity and an austere finish. Very Good+. About $18.
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Arnaldo-Caprai Montefalco Rosso 2010. 14.5% alc. 70% sangiovese, 15% sangrantino, 15% merlot. A year in wood (70% Slavonian oak, 30% French barriques), plus four months in bottle. Deep, dense ruby hue; very sangiovese-like, with pure penetrating elements of graphite, tar, spiced tea and orange rind, currants and plums; spanking tannins and acidity; very dry; dusty loamy minerality. Cries out for braised short ribs or veal shanks. Excellent. About $22.
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Lunelli Ziggurat Montefalco Rosso 2010. 14.5% alc. 70% sangiovese, 15% sagrantino, 15% cabernet sauvignon and merlot. A year in a combination of barriques and tonneaux, that is, 225 liters and 500 liters, plus six months in bottle. Dark to medium ruby color; fleshy, meaty, spiced and macerated black and red fruit scents and flavors; a lithe, muscular and tannic wine, a little brusque now; give it a year or two. Very Good+. About $18 to $20.
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Le Cimate Montefalco Rosso 2010. 14.5% alc. 60% sangiovese, 15% sagrantino, 15% merlot, 10% cabernet sauvignon. Precise information on aging unavailable. Intense dark ruby color; very dark, spicy, tarry, dusty, iodine and iron; glimmers of deeply macerated black cherries and plums, with hints of prunes and black olives; quite tannic, dense, tense with acidity, fairly austere finish; needs a year or two. Very Good+. About $20.
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Montefalco Sagrantino:
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Scacciadiavoli 2008, Montefalco Sagrantino. 15% alc. No information on aging. Dark ruby color; deep, dark, spicy, tarry, brooding; dust, leather; fiercely tannic, ferocious acidity; earthy and loamy, iodine and iron; yes, a tinge of black and red fruit, but needs three or four more years or serious decanting before you drink. Very Good+. About $40 to $45.
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Tenuta Bellafonte 2009, Montefalco Sagrantino. 14.5% alc. This wine spent 36 months in large Slavonian oak barrels and 10 months in the bottle. Dark ruby; ripe, meaty and fleshy; prunes, black olives, balsamic character; quite dense, chewy and tannic; opens slowly, showing hints of black and red cherries, currants and plums, but overall dry, austere, demanding. Try from 2016 or ’18 through 2026 to ’30. Very Good+. About $50 to $55.
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Romanelli 2010, Montefalco Sagrantino. 15.5% alc. Dark to medium ruby; prunes and plums, spice box, tobacco leaf. rosemary and its resinous quality; spiced and macerated black and red currants, touch of blueberry; smoke and leather; brutal tannins, soaring acidity; you smell and taste the wood from 18 months in barriques and large casks; still, displays innate balance and integration. Needs four to six years before drinking or decant at least an hour before a hearty meal. Tremendous power and character. Excellent. About $40 to $45.
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Perticaia 2009, Montefalco Sagrantino. 14.5% alc. One year in French oak barriques; one year in steel vats; one year in bottle. Quite deep ruby fading to garnet at the rim; dusty graphite, iodine and iron; resinous and balsamic; tar, black olives, smoke, fermented tea; deeply macerated black currants and cherries; dense but sifted tannins, resonant acidity; dry austere finish. Excellent potential after 2016 or ’17 and developing through 2025 to ’30. About $49.
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I haven’t chosen a pinot grigio as Wine of the Week since sometime in February 2012, the primary reason being that this space is reserved for products that offer distinction, class, style and, usually, value. Many pinot grigios indeed don’t cost much, but they tend to fall down in the areas of style, class and distinction. An exception to that rule is the Livon Pinot Grigio 2013, Collio, from Italy’s northeastern province of Friuli-Venezia Giulia. Made all in stainless steel, this pinot grigio offers a pale straw-gold color with a faint green overlay; aromas of almond, almond skin, roasted lemon and lemon balm are highlighted by notes of lemongrass, verbena, nutmeg and a bracing sort of salt-marsh aura. No inconsequential or innocuous little quaffer, the Livon Pinot Grigio 2013 delivers a fairly dense texture that supports lemon, spiced pear and yellow plum flavors enlivened by incisive acidity and decisive crystalline limestone minerality. The whole package resonates with expressive savory and saline qualities that lift the wine above the ordinary; the finish is elegant and a bit austere. 12.5 percent alcohol. Now through 2015 with shrimp risotto, broiled trout with lemon and capers, clam spaghetti, that sort of thing. Excellent. About $17, representing Good Value.

Imported by Angelini Selections, Centerbrook, Conn. A sample for review.

This trio of Soave Classico wines from the Inama estate will probably be among the best examples, if not the best, that you have tried. Notable for their floral nature, their round fruity character balanced by keen acidity and limestone minerality and their impressive presence and tone, they are perfect for drinking with the seafood dishes so prevalent in the Veneto. Winemaker is Stefano Inama, who brings a thoughtful touch to his products, particularly in the nuances of used oak barrels and stainless steel tanks. The wines are made from 100 percent garganega grapes and are imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, in the city of Napa, California. These were samples for review.
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Inama’s basic release, the “Vin Soave” 2012, Soave Classico, spends its formative months in stainless steel tanks, thereby retaining enticing freshness and crisp acidity. This is a pretty wine, abundantly adorned with notes of almond blossom and lilac, hay and grass, lemon and peach, all ensconced in a pleasing texture that balances resonant tautness and moderate lushness over a fair amount of limestone minerality. 12 percent alcohol. Very appealing for immediate consumption. Very Good+. About $15, representing Fine Value.
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Inama Vigneti di Foscarino 2012, Soave Classico. The color is pale gold, the bouquet a winsome amalgam of ginger and quince, lemon balm and almond blossom, roasted lemon and yellow plums, altogether deeply and broadly spicy. Fermentation occurs in used barriques with the wine racked to stainless steel vats for six months duration. A lovely moderately lush texture is animated by brisk acidity and a scintillating limestone element, the whole package being saline and savory, with a note of grapefruit bitterness on the finish. 12.5 percent alcohol. Now through 2015 or ’16. Excellent. About $24.
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Inama Vigneto du Lot 2011, Soave Classico. For this single-vineyard wine, fermentation and malolactic take place in standard barriques, 30 percent new oak barrels, for six months; the wine then goes into stainless steel vats for another six months. The color is radiant medium gold, while the bouquet offers a beguiling (yet slightly spare and austere) wreathing of almond skin and almond blossom, the dusty dry floral nature of acacia, spiced pear with a hint of peach; a few minutes in the glass bring in notes of lemongrass and greengage plum. The wine is leafy, wind-blown, saline in the mouth, layering citrus and stone-fruit flavors with damp limestone and flint and chiming acidity. 13 percent alcohol. Now through 2015 or ’16 with seafood risotto, fish stews, grilled salmon or swordfish. With its sleek tone and presence, this is certainly one of the two or three best Soave Classicos I have tasted. Excellent. About $30.
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