Grenache


Well, thank goodness all that Thanksgiving hubbub is over and the attendant brouhaha about what wine to drink with the turkey and dressing and sweet potatoes and so on, so now we can focus just on wines to drink because we like them. Here are brief reviews of 12 such wines that should appeal to many tastes and pocketbooks. Prices range from $15 to $56; there are three white wines and nine reds, including a couple of sangiovese blends and a pair of white Rhône renditions from California, as well as a variety of other types of wines and grape varieties. As usual with these Weekend Wine Notes, I eschew technical, historical and geographical data for the sake of offering incisive notices designed to pique your interest and whet the palate, after which you may choose to wet your palate. These wines were samples for review. Enjoy! (In moderation, of course.)
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Capezzana Barco Reale di Carmignano 2011, Tuscany, Italy.13.5% alc. 70% sangiovese, 20% cabernet sauvignon, 10% canaiolo. Dark ruby-purple hue; raspberry, mulberry and blueberry, notes of potpourri, dried herbs and orange peel; a bit of stiff tannin from the cabernet, but handily a tasty and drinkable quaff with requisite acidity for vigor. Now through 2015. Very Good+. About $15, representing Good Value.
MW Imports, White Plains, N.Y.
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Bordòn Reserva 2008, Rioja, Spain. 13.5% alc. 80% tempranillo, 15% garnacha, 5% mazuela. Medium ruby color; mint, pine and iodine, macerated and slightly stewed red and black currants and cherries; violets, lavender, pot pourri, cloves and sandalwood; very dry, autumnal with hints of mushrooms and moss, nicely rounded currant and plum flavors, vivid acidity; a lovely expression of the grape. Now through 2016 to ’18 with roasted game birds. Very Good +. About $15, a Real Bargain.
Imported by Vision Wine & Spirits, Secaucus, N.J.
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Jacopo Biondi Santi Braccale 2010, Toscano. 13.5% alc. 80% sangiovese, 20% merlot. Medium ruby color; raspberries and red currants, orange zest and black tea, hints of briers and brambles, touches of graphite, violets, blueberries and cloves, intriguing complexity for the price; plenty of dry tannins and brisk acidity for structure, fairly spare on the plate, but pleasing texture and liveliness; flavors of dried red and black fruit; earthy finish. Now through 2016 or ’17 with grilled or braised meat, hearty pasta dishes. Very Good+. About $19, marking Good Value.
Imported by Vision Wine & Spirits, Secaucus, N.J.
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Clayhouse Estate Grenache Blanc Viognier 2013, Paso Robles. 14.5% alc. 70% grenache blanc, 30% viognier. Production was 650 bottles, so Worth a Search. Pale gold color; crystalline freshness, clarity and liveliness; jasmine and acacia, yellow plums, quince and ginger; beautifully balanced and integrated, exquisite elegance and spareness; saline and savory, though, with bracing acidity running through a pleasing talc-like texture; backnotes of almond blossom and dried thyme; a supple, lithe limestone-packed finish. Now through the end of 2015. Excellent. About $23.
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Les Trois Couronnes 2011, Gigondas, Rhône Valley, France. 14.5% alc. 70% grenache, 20% syrah, 10% mourvèdre. Dark ruby-violet color; lovely, enchanting bouquet of black olives, thyme, graphite, moss and mushrooms, opening to plums and black currants, pepper, leather and lavender; a bit of wet-dog funkiness aligns with dusty, supple tannins and beautifully integrated oak and acidity; rich, spicy black fruit flavors with a hint of blueberry; undertones of loam, underbrush, black licorice; spice-and-mineral-packed finish. Drink now through 2017 to ’19. Great with beef braised in red wine. Excellent. About $23.
Imported by OWS Cellars Selections, North Miami, Fla.
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Paul Dolan Zinfandel 2012, Mendocino County. 14.5% alc. Certified organic. Transparent ruby with a magenta rim; notes of strawberry, raspberry and blueberry with a nice raspy touch and hints of briers and brambles, black pepper, bitter chocolate and walnut shell; ripe and spicy raspberry and cherry flavors, a bit meaty and fleshy, but increasingly bound with dusty tannins and graphite minerality, all enlivened by generous acidity. Not a blockbuster but plenty of stuffing. Now through 2016. Excellent. About $25.
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Bonny Doon Le Cigare Blanc 2013, Arroyo Seco, Monterey County. 55% roussanne, 26% grenache blanc, 19% picpoul. 1,965 cases. Very pale gold hue; green apple, peach and spiced pear; lemon balm, ginger and quince; wonderful tension and resolution of texture and structure; taut acidity, dense and almost voluptuous yet spare, tensile and vibrant with crystalline limestone minerality; seamless melding of lightly spiced and macerated citrus and stone-fruit flavors; feels alive on the palate, engaging and compelling. Now through 2016 or ’17. Exceptional. About $28.
The winery website has not caught up with the current vintage.
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Cornerstone Cellars Stepping Stone Pinot Noir 2012, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 14.1% alc. 100% pinot noir grapes. Dark to medium ruby-mulberry color; black cherry and raspberry scents and flavors with plenty of tannic “rasp” and underlying notes of briers, brambles and loam; cloves, a hint of rhubarb, a touch of cherry cola; all enlivened by pert acidity. A minor key with major dimension. Now through 2016. Excellent. About $30.
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von Hövel “R” Spatlese Dry Riesling 2012, Mosel, Germany. 11% alc. 100% riesling. Very pale gold color; peach, pear and lychee; hints of honeysuckle, grapefruit and lime zest; a chiseled and faceted wine, benefiting from incisive acidity and scintillating limestone and flint elements; tremendous, indeed inescapable resonance and presence, yet elegant, delicate and almost ethereal; long penetrating spice and mineral-inflected finish. Now through 2018 to ’20. Excellent. About $34.
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Sequoia Grove Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Napa Valley. 14.2% alc. 81% cabernet sauvignon, 9% cabernet franc, 8% merlot, 1% each petit verdot and malbec. Deep ruby with a magenta tinge; cedar and thyme, hint of black olive; quite spicy and macerated black currants and plums with a hint of black and red cherry; lithe, supple, muscular and sleek; dense but soft and finely sifted tannins adorned with slightly toasty oak, a scintillating graphite element and vibrant acidity; long spicy, granitic finish. Now through 2016 to ’18. Excellent. About $38.
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Bonny Doon Cuvee R Grenache 2012, Monterey County. 14.9% alc. 100% grenache grapes. 593 cases. (Available to the winery’s DEWN Club members.) Dark reddish-cherry hue; dusty, spicy red and black cherries, with a curranty note and hint of raspberry; some cherry stem and pit pertness and raspiness; cloves and sandalwood, with a tide of plum skin and loam; the finely-knit and sanded tannins build as the minutes pass; clean, vibrant acidity lends energy and litheness. Terrific grenache. Drink now through 2016. Excellent. About $48.
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Plumpjack Merlot 2012, Napa Valley. 15.2% alc. (!) 91% merlot, 8% malbec, 1% cabernet sauvignon. Vivid dark ruby color; intense and concentrated aromas of cassis, black raspberry and plum; notes of cloves and sandalwood with a tinge of pomegranate and red cherry; a hint of toasty oak; sinewy and supple, almost muscular; deep black fruit flavors imbued with lavender and bitter chocolate and honed by finely-milled tannins, graphite minerality and keen acidity; a substantial merlot, not quite monumental because of its innate balance and elegance; through some miracle, you don’t feel the heat or sweetness of high alcohol. Now through 2020 to ’22, Excellent. About $56.
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Vacqueyras became part of the Côtes du Rhône appellation in 1937 and only in 1990 was it allowed into the ranks of regions whose wines could be bottled with their own place name. It lies south of Gigondas — also a former Côtes du Rhône Villages commune, elevated to its own status in 1971 — on the river Ouvèze, a tributary of the Rhône. Production here is about 97 percent red, with grenache serving as principal grape. The Lavau Vacqueyras 2011 is a blend of 50 percent grenache, 40 percent syrah and 10 percent mourvèdre; the wine aged 20 percent in oak barrels, 80 percent in stainless steel tanks, and indeed it’s notable for freshness and a character that derives little from the influence of wood. The color is radiant ruby-purple, violet-tinged; the wine is intensely floral and spicy, with aromas of marinated black currants, blackberries and plums permeated by lavender and potpourri, cloves and sandalwood, with undertones of briers and brambles, smoke and tobacco leaf. It’s a dry, robust wine, certainly not elegant but not rustic, either; fine-grained tannins and vigorous acidity support delicious black fruit flavors deeply imbued with graphite minerality and earthy, loamy elements. 13.5 percent alcohol. We drank this bottle with beef shanks braised with carrots, potatoes and turnips bathed in a rich winy sauce, and the match was perfect. Now through 2017 to 2020, with similar braised meat dishes. Excellent. About $24.

Imported by Kinson Wines, New York. This wine was a sample for review. The label image is two years behind the example reviewed here, but it was a very clear picture, so I used it.


Casting about for a bright, fresh, fruity wine to accompany a pizza the primary elements of which were Brussels sprouts leaves, leeks and bacon, I settled on the Bonny Doon Clos de Gilroy Grenache 2013, Monterey County, and got exactly what I wanted. The wine is a blend of 75 percent grenache grapes, 17 percent syrah and 8 percent mourvèdre. The color is dark ruby with a glint of magenta at the rim. Bright, fresh and fruity, indeed, with blackcurrant, raspberry and strawberry aromas permeated by notes of pomegranate and cloves and hints of pepper and graphite. Sleek on the palate, this is an easy-drinking wine, or deceptively so, because you become aware, as the moments pass, of firm, fine-grained tannins and slick-as-a-whistle acidity for balance and verve. And its black and red fruit flavors are delicious. 14 percent alcohol. Now through 2015 or ’16. Delightful and, in my experience, versatile. Very Good+. About $20.

A sample for review.

The Grant and the Eddie of Grant Eddie Winery in North Yuba, Sierra Foothills, are Grant Ramey and Edward Shulten. Their label was called Ramey Shulten until a letter came from the well-known Ramey Wine Cellars in Sonoma County that said, in essence, “Oh no, boys, you’re treading on our trademark.” That’s when the brand became Grant Eddie. Ramey, a North Yuba native (on the right in this photo), was for many years the vineyard manager at Renaissance Vineyards and Winery. He began making wine at home from selected sites among the Renaissance hilltop vineyards in 1986. Shulten, originally from the Netherlands, was a well-traveled winemaker and sommelier; he is now winemaker for Renaissance, replacing Gideon Beinstock, who concentrates on his Clos Saron project. Ramey, who knows the acres of Renaissance better than anyone, leases some of the best sections for cabaernet sauvignon, merlot, syrah, grenache and other red varieties.

Production is tiny at Grant Eddie, perhaps 700 cases annually, and the quality is very high, especially in the red wines. Alcohol levels are kept below 14 percent; the words “new oak” are not uttered unless in disparagement, though Ramey and Shulten are too polite to be disparaging. Vineyards are tended organically; grapes are fermented naturally and sulfites are kept to a minimum. When I was in California’s Sierra Foothills region back in June, I sat down with Grant Ramey and tasted through a wide range of Grant Eddie wines. I would encourage My Readers to look for the syrahs and the grenache wines particularly, though the zinfandels and cabernets thoroughly reward consideration; the cabernets tend to need five to seven years to shed their tannins. The whites — fewer than 200 cases altogether each year — are highly individual wines that lean toward eccentricity yet are interesting enough to merit a try.

Where are these wines? Distribution is very limited outside California. The wines are available through the website — grantedwinery.com — or if you happen to be in the area, you can find Grant Ramey at local farmer’s markets on weekends. Yes, in the Golden State wineries can offer tastings and sales of wines at these institutions.
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First, the white wines, all made half in French oak, half in stainless steel, the lees stirred once a week for five or six months. The white production at Grant Eddie is so small — about 200 cases altogether — that the wines seem almost superfluous, though because of their individual, even idiosyncratic character they’re worth exploring, especially the Semillon 2012 and the White Pearl from 2010 and ’11.

Semillon 2012. Medium gold color; roasted lemon, yellow plum, figs, leafy and savory; very dry, dusty, notes of loam and limestone; lovely texture, almost lush but cut by tremendous acidity; super attractive for drinking through 2015 or ’16. Excellent. About $22.
White Pearl 2010, a blend of 60 percent semillon and 40 percent sauvignon blanc that spent seven or eight months in two-to-four-year-old barrels. Medium gold color; very ripe, a little earthy; creamy fig, roasted lemon, a note of dried thyme; hint of creme brulee; quite dry, though, with a lovely moderately lush texture cut by fleet acidity; fairly austere on the finish. Excellent. About $22
White Pearl 2011. Moderate gold color, an idiosyncratic wine, highly individual and not quite fitting into any set of expectations; notes of roasted lemon, lime peel and and slightly over-ripe mango; very spicy, lively; very dry, with a taut acid-and-limestone structure, yet generous, yielding, a bit buxom. Very Good+. About $22.
Chardonnay 2013. Medium gold color; pineapple, grapefruit, mango; florid, bold, fairly tropical; quite dry, very spicy, doesn’t quite hang together. Very Good. About $22.
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Now the reds, first grenache, about 100 cases annually. From Ramey Mountain Vineyard.

Grenache 2011. Dark ruby, opaque; very earthy, briery and loamy; ripe, very spicy, a little wet-dog-funkiness; sweetly
ripe and intense blackberry-blueberry-raspberry flavors; fairly dense and chewy tannins but light on its feet; svelte, supple. Best after 2015, then to 2019 or ’20. Excellent.
Grenache 2010. Deep ruby color; intoxicating evocative bouquet of dried flowers, dried spices, fresh and macerated black and red fruit; clean and incisive, briers and brambles, loamy earthiness and graphite minerality; pinpoint acidity; dusty tannins; a supple, shapely grenache. Now through 2018 to 2020. Excellent.
Grenache 2007. Medium ruby hue; ripe, warm, spicy, a little fleshy; macerated and slightly roasted red and black currants and plums; lovely texture, sapid, savory; lip-smacking acidity in perfect balance with fruit, oak and gently dusty, leather-clad tannins; great length and tone. Now through 2016 to ’18. Excellent.

Sangiovese, about 50 cases annually.

Sangiovese 2011. 13.3% alc. Ramey Mountain Vineyard. Dark ruby-purple; wholly tannic, needs three to four years to learn company manners. Very Good+. About $22.
Sangiovese 2007. 13.6% alc. Whitman’s Glen Vineyard. Medium ruby color; raspberries, red and black currants, cloves, orange rind, black tea, hint of olive; fresh, agile, elegant; lovely fluid texture; classic. Now through 2016 to ’18. Excellent.

Zinfandel, 50 to 60 cases annually.

Zinfandel 2012. 13.9% alc. Ramey Mountain Vineyard. Deep purple with a magenta rim; clean, fresh, lithe; very pure and intense; blackberries, blueberries, black currants with a vein of poignant graphite minerality; perfectly managed tannins for framing and foundation, a little austere on the finish. Try from 2015 or ’16 through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $27.
Zinfandel 2007. 13.5% alc. Whitman’s Mountain Vineyard. dark ruby with a garnet rim; ripe, meaty, fleshy, warm, spicy; macerated black fruit; vibrant, resonant structure, lively and vital, drinking beautifully. Through 2017 or ’18. Excellent.

Merlot, from Ramey Mountain Vineyard

Merlot 2011. 13.6% alc. Deep ruby-purple; very minerally, earthy and briery, distinct graphite and iodine element; large-framed, dense, dusty, chewy, fairly muscular tannins and bright acidity; will this evolve into something like merlot or more like cabernet? Try 2016 through 2020 to ’22. Very Good+. About $27.
Merlot 2008. 13.6% alc. Deep ruby-purple color but softer and riper than the ’11, almost luscious, but cut by iron-like tannins and arrow-bright acidity; black currants, blueberries and plums; clove and allspice build in the background over lavender and biter chocolate; needs more time, say 2015 or ’16 through 2018 to ’20. Excellent.

Syrah, this winery’s strength. “Syrah takes a while to even come to the beginning of something,” Ramey told me. You have to work with nature and the demands it makes on you.”

Syrah 2009. 13.7% alc. Ramey Mountain Vineyard. Deep ruby color; incredible concentration and intensity of variety, confidence and purpose, though almost pure graphite and granitic minerality now and draped with dense dusty tannins; youthfully inchoate, needs three or four years to find balance, but the depths of character are apparent. Try from 2015 or ’17 through 2022 to ’25. Excellent. About $27.
Syrah 2007. 13.8% alc. Whitman’s Mountain Vineyard. Dark ruby with a slightly lighter garnet rim; a tad riper and more approachable than the ’09 but lots of dusty minerality, iron and iodine; the purity and intensity of black fruit are impressive and alluring; quite dry, the finish a bit austere. Now through 2017 to 2020. Excellent.
Ramey Schulten Syrah 2004. 13% alc. Meadow’s Knoll Vineyard. This is beautiful, such depth and layering, such a combination of character and personality, with pinpoint and vibrant fruit, acidity and graphite minerality; such a feeling of poise and expectation, though still huge, dense, chewy, with real edge, grit and glamor. A masterpiece, to drink through 2018 to ’20. Exceptional.

Cabernet sauvignon.

There are two Grant Eddie cabernet sauvignon wines for 2012, one that’s 100 percent cabernet, the second a blend that includes four percent merlot and three percent each cabernet franc and petit verdot. Not necessarily predictably but it turned out that the 100 percent version features an almost pure graphite-granitic-iron-and-iodine character with tannins that are hard, lithe and dusty but not punishing. Give this one until 2018 or ’20 and drink until 2028 or ’30. The alternate rendition is fairly burly and tannic but offers notes of cassis, black cherry, lavender and cloves as concession. Excellent potential for each, and each about $28. The 2009 and 2007, each from Ramey Mountain Vineyard and delivering 13.7 percent alcohol, and not nearly ready to drink, offering penetrating minerality and acidity. Give them three or four more years’ aging.
Let’s go back, however, to the Ramey Schulten Cabernet Sauvignon 1997, a blend of 50 percent cabernet sauvignon, 20 percent syrah and 15 percent each cabernet franc and merlot, for a wine of gorgeous shape and proportion that displays sweetly ripe black and red fruit scents and flavors, evocative spice and mild herbal qualities and deep foundational tannins and resonant acidity for essential structure. This and the Syrah 2004 were the best wines of an extraordinary tasting.

Grant Eddie also produces 75 to 100 cases of port (or port-like) wine every year, made from the classic Douro Valley grapes, of which the inky-purple California Port 2012 is young, bright, vigorous and intensely minerally, with soft elegant tannins (about $33); the Ramey-Schulten 2001 is lightly spiced and macerated, a bit sweet and plummy; and the gently faded Ramey Schulten 1992 — a real treat — offers notes of fruitcake, toffee, figs, cloves and orange zest in supple and mildly tannic structure.
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Tres Ojos Garnacha is one of the world’s great wine bargains. Produced by the cooperative Bodega San Gregorio, founded in 1965 in the Calatayud wine region in Spain’s province of Aragon, this wine consistently offers lots of pleasure and surprising depth of character for the price. Tres Ojos — “three eyes” — Garnacha 2011 is a blend of 85 percent garnacha (grenache) grapes, seven percent each cabernet sauvignon and tempranillo and one percent syrah; made all in stainless steel, it sees no oak, The color is deep ruby with a mulberry tinge; first your nose picks up notes of tar, black olives, smoked tea, followed by scents of spiced and macerated blackberries, blueberries and plums, the whole effect having a slight balsamic cast. Plenty of grip keeps dusty tannins on the palate in support of dense black and blue fruit flavors permeated by hints of bitter chocolate, lavender and graphite; vibrant acidity keep the wine alert and lively. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2015 with grilled leg of lamb, braised short ribs, hearty stews. Very Good+. About $10, so Buy by the Case.

Imported by Kysela Pere et Fils, Winchester, Va. Tasted as a wholesaler’s trade event.

I say “affordable” because this French company, overseen by managing director Christian Seely, owns a group of high-powered properties whose products are not to be mentioned in the same sentence with the word “cheap.” AXA’s estates include the Bordeaux chateaux of Pichon Longueville Baron (Second growth in the 1855 Classification) and Pibran in Paulillac, Suduiraut (First growth) in Sauternes and Petit-Village in Pomerol; the distinguished Domaine de L’Arlot in Burgundy; Disznóko in Hungary, producer of top-notch Tokaj; and Quinto do Noval, one of the oldest — dating back to 1715 — and most prestigious Port properties in the Douro Valley. Man and woman cannot, however, live by expensive wine alone, so the company provides, from its outpost in the Languedoc and from Noval (table wine, not Port), less costly products that mere mortals can afford and enjoy. These are imported by Vintus LLC in Pleasantville, N.Y. and were, in this case, samples for review.
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So, the Cedro do Noval 2009 is a blend of 50 percent touriga nacional grapes, 30 percent touriga franca, 10 percent tinta roriz (known as tempranillo in Spain) and 10 percent syrah, and it’s the minor inclusion of the syrah that prevents this wine from carrying a Douro designation, syrah not being an allowed grape in that famous river valley. Thus the designation Vinho Regional Duriense, a term, I confess, that I have not seen until now. The color is a youthful dark ruby purple, and at almost five years old, the wine is notably fresh, pure and lively. Aromas of cedar, dried rosemary and its slightly resinous nature, dried thyme, spiced and macerated plums and red and black currants open to deeper touches of dusty graphite. Cedro do Noval 2009 defines robust and rustic, embodying a hearty, full-bodied character in its dense, chewy texture and ripe, deeply spicy and savory red and black fruit flavors; a supple structure emboldened by 18 months in French oak barrels is permeated by earthy, leathery tannins. 14 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018 to ’20 with the heartiest of grilled, roasted or braised meats. Very Good+. About $22.
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A blend of 60 percent syrah grapes, 30 percent grenache and 10 percent mourvèdre, Mas Belles Eaux “Les Coteaux” 2009, Languedoc, aged 15 months in one-to-three-year-old French oak barrels. The color is dark ruby with a magenta tinge at the rim; expressive aromas of ripe plums, cherries and blackberries are deeply spicy and laden with hints of lavender and potpourri, cloves and sandalwood, notes of leather, briers and brambles, all for an effect that’s both earthy and exotic. As was the case with the Cedro do Noval 09, this wine, at five years old, is fresh and clean and appealing, offering tasty plum and currant flavors infused with hints of dried spice and flowers and dusty graphite and supported by a structure of vibrant acidity and moderately firm tannins. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2016 to ’18 with roasted veal, coq au vin, rabbit fricassee. Excellent. About $20.
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Oddly enough, I haven’t written about Tres Picos Borsao since the 2005 vintage, a situation I now remedy because it’s one of the world’s great wine bargains. Made from 100 percent garnacha (or grenache) grapes in Spain’s Campo de Borja region, Tres Picos Borsao 2012 aged a few months half in stainless steel, half in French oak barrels. The color is intense dark ruby; aromas of ripe red and black currants and plums are permeated by notes of graphite and cloves, briers and brambles. On the palate, the wine is rich, spicy and dense, enlivened by spanking acidity and framed by moderately grainy, chewy tannins; a few moments in the glass add touches of black olives, smoked tea and dried rosemary to the savory red and black fruit flavors. This is vivacious without being flirty and robust without being rustic; it would be perfect with grilled chorizo sausages, leg of lamb, roasted peppers and such. Alcohol content not available. Drink now through 2015 or ’16. Very Good+. About $17, representing Great Value, and seen as low as $13 or $14.

A Jorge Ordoñez Selection, tasted at a local distributor’s event.

I think I’ll name my next rock group “Eclectic Plethora,” but be that as it may, today I offer again a bunch of rosé wines, from various regions of France and California, in hopes of convincing My Readers not to abandon rosés simply because Labor Day has come and gone. While the most delicate rosés may be most appropriate in High Summer, even they can serve a purpose throughout the rest of the year. More robust and versatile rosés can be consumed with a variety of foods, and by “robust” I don’t mean blockbusters a few shades less stalwart than cabernet sauvignon or zinfandel, I just mean rosés that deliver a bit more body and fruit than the most delicate. As is my habit in these “Weekend Wine Notes,” I don’t include reams of technical, historical or geographical information, much as that sort of data makes our hearts go pitty-pat, because the intention here is to offer quick and incisive reviews that will pique your interest and tempt your palate. Unless otherwise indicated, these were samples for review. Enjoy!
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Chateau de Campuget “Tradition de Campuget” Rosé 2013, Costières de Nîmes. 13% alc. 70% syrah, 30% grenache (according to the label); 50% syrah, 50 % grenache blanc (according to the press release). Pale onion skin color; delicate hints of strawberries and watermelon, ephemeral notes of dried herbs and dusty-flint minerality; quite dry, crisp and spare; a flush of floral nuance. The most ethereal of this group of rosé wines, yet bound by tensile strength. Very Good+. About $10, a Great Bargain.
Dreyfus, Ashby, New York.
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Laurent Miquel “Pere et Fils” Cinsault Syrah 2013, Pays d’Oc. 12.5% alc. 80% cinsault, 20% syrah. The palest flush of pink imaginable; raspberry, red currants, celery seed, dried thyme; clean and crisp, a resonant note of limestone minerality; the cinsault lends a vibrant spine of keen acidity. Simple style but enjoyable, especially at the price. Very Good. About $11.
Frederick Wildman and Sons, New York.
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Domaine Les Aphillanthes Rosé 2013, Côtes du Rhône. 13% alc. Cinsault, grenache, counoise, mourvèdre. Slightly ruddy copper-salmon color; raspberries and strawberries, hints of peach and melon; slightly herbal; very dry and crisp with tides of flint and limestone minerality and vibrant acidity; appealing texture, clean and elegant. Excellent. About $14, representing Good Value.
Peter Weygandt Selection, Weygandt-Metzler, Unionville, Penn.
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Domaine de Mourchon “Loubié” Rosé 2013, Seguret, Côtes du Rhône Villages. 12.5% alc. 60% grenache, 40% syrah. Entrancing pale salmon-peach color; very clean and fresh, with notes of raspberries and red cherries, a hint of melon; an earthy touch of raspiness and cherry stems; almost a shimmer of limestone minerality and crisp acidity, yet with a lovely enfolding texture; finish offers hints of cloves and dried thyme. Exemplary balance and tone. Excellent. About $16 to $18.
Cynthia Hurley French Wines, West Newton, Mass.
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Chateau d’Aqueria 2012, Tavel. 14% alc. 50% grenache, 12% each syrah, cinsault and clairette, 8% mourvèdre, 5% boueboulenc, 1% picpoul. Ruddy salmon-peach color; the ripest and fleshiest of these rosé wines; spiced and macerated strawberries and raspberries, notes of cloves and cardamom, dusty dried field herbs (garrigue); fairly robust and vigorous; quite dry, almost austere, but juicy with spice and limestone-inflected red fruit flavors. The 2013 version of this wine in on the market, but I was sent 2012 as a sample, so drink up. Very Good+. About $18.
Kobrand Corp., Purchase, N.Y.
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McCay Cellars Rosé 2013, Lodi. 12.5% alc. Primarily old vine carignane with some grenache. 253 cases. Lovely peach-salmon color; subdued peach, melon and strawberry aromas, hints of red currants and pomegranate and a note of rose petal; subtle, clean, refreshing but with incisive acidity and considerable limestone minerality, a dusty brambly element as complement to a texture that’s both supple and spare. Beautifully done. Excellent. About $18.
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Baudry-Dutour “Cuvee Marie Justine” Chinon 2013, Val de Loire. 12.5 % alc. 100% cabernet franc. Very pale onion skin hue; delicate and slightly dusty hints of strawberries and red currants; notes of dried herbs and spice, just a touch of a floral component, violets or lilacs; crisp and lively acidity, an animated element of limestone minerality; cool, clean and refreshing but revealing a scant bit of loamy earthiness on the finish. beautifully knit. Very Good+. About $20, my purchase.
William Harrison Imports, Manassas, Va.
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Tablas Creek Vineyard Patelin de Tablas Rosé 2013, Paso Robles. 14.1% alc. 73% grenache, 22% mourvèdre, 5% counoise. 1,540 cases. Classic pale onion-skin hue; smoke, dust, damp flint and limestone; dried currants and raspberries, deeply earthy and minerally; hints of melon and mulberry; a beguiling combination of opulence and austerity, hitting all the right notes of balance and intrigue. Excellent. About $22, my purchase.
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Copain Wines “Tous Ensemble” Rosé of Pinot Noir 2013, Anderson Valley. 12.7% alc. 100% pinot noir. 1,435 cases. Pale salmon-copper color; raspberry, melon, sour cherry, very pure and fresh; provocative acidity and scintillating limestone minerality keep it brisk and breezy; lovely balance between chiseled spareness and lush elegance. One of California’s best rosés. Excellent. About $24, my purchase.
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All sorts of reasons exist to justify our interest in wine — wine tastes great, on its own and with food; wine is a complicated beverage that encourages thought and contemplation; wine gets you drunk — and one of those reasons is the story behind the wine. Now not all wines have compelling stories. The cheap wine fostered in vast vineyards in California’s Central Valley and raised in giant tanks on megalithic farms generally does not offer a fascinating back-story. And financially-padded collectors don’t suck up cases of Chateau Latour and Haut Brion because of the histories of those august properties.

This pair of rosé wines, however, tells one of those tales of a dream long-striven for and finally accomplished. When I mention that the wines derive from the Cotes de Provence appellation in the South of France by a couple who never made wine before, My Readers may rise to their feet and let loose a chorus of “Brad and Angelina!” but no, I am not speaking of the (excellent) celebrity rosé Miraval, now in its second vintage, but of the slightly older Mirabeau, the brain-child of Stephen Cronk, an Englishman who gave up his job in telecommunications and house in Teddington in southwest London — motto: “We’re in southwest London!” — and moved his family to the village of Contignac in Provence for the purpose of growing grapes and making rosé wines. Cronk did not possess the fame, notoriety, influence and fiduciary prowess of the Pitt/Jolie cohort, but he did manifest a large portion of grit, married, inevitably, to naivete. (This is also a great-looking family; they could be making a ton of dough in commercials. Image from the winery website.)

Cronk discovered that he couldn’t afford to purchase vineyard land, even at the height of the recession, so he settled for being a negociant, buying grapes from growers that he searched for diligently and with the help and advice of Master of Wine Angela Muir. Five years after he began the process, his Mirabeau brand is sold in 10 countries and is now available in two versions in the U.S.A.

Mirabeau “Classic” Rosé 2013, Côtes de Provence, is a blend of grenache, syrah and vermentino grapes that offers an alluring pale copper-salmon color and enticing aromas of fresh strawberries and raspberries with hints of dried red currants and cloves and a barely discernible note of orange rind and lime peel. The wine slides across the palate with crisp vivacity yet with a touch of lush red fruit in a well-balanced structure that includes a finishing element of dried herbs and limestone. 13 percent alcohol. A very attractive, modestly robust rosé for drinking with picnic fare such as cold fried chicken, deviled eggs, cucumber sandwiches — or a rabbit terrine with a loaf of crusty bread. Very Good+. About $16.

The Mirabeau Pure Rosé 2013, Côtes de Provence, is a different sort of creature. A blend of 50 percent grenache, 40 percent syrah and 10 percent vermentino, this classic is elegant, high-toned and spare, delicate but spun with tensile strength and the tension of steely acidity. The color is the palest onion skin or “eye of the partridge”; hints of strawberry and peach, lilac, lime peel and almond skin in a texture that practically shimmers with limestone and flint minerality; rather than lush, this is chiseled, faceted, a gem-like construct that still manages to satisfy in a sensual and exhilarating measure. 13.5 percent alcohol. We drank this over several evenings as an aperitif while cooking and snacking. Excellent. About $22.

Seaview Imports, Port Washington, N.Y. Samples for review. Bottle image by Hans Aschim from coolhunting.com.

Today’s notes feature eight rosé wines, four from France, three from California and one from the state of Virginia. In style they range from ephemeral to fairly robust. I have to take shots at a couple of these examples, but those are the breaks in the realm of wine reviewing. No attempt at technical, historical, geographical or personal information here (you know, the stuff I really dote on); instead, the intent is to pique your interest and whet your palate. Except for the Calera Vin Gris of Pinot Noir 2013, these were samples for review. Enjoy!
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Chateau de Berne Terres de Berne Rosé 2013, Côtes de Provence, France. 13% alc. 50% each grenache and cinsault. Very pale onion skin hue, almost shimmers; light kisses of strawberry, peach and orange rind, hints of dried thyme; bone-dry, crisp and vibrant, loads of scintillating limestone minerality. Really well-made and enjoyable but packaged in an annoying over-designed bottle that’s too tall to fit on a refrigerator shelf. Excellent. About $20.
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Bila-Haut Rosé 2013, Pays d’Oc, France. 13.5% alc. Cinsault and grenache. (From M. Chapoutier) Pretty copper-salmon color; orange zest and raspberries, dusty minerals, notes of rose petals and lavender; quite dry, with limestone austerity, a fairly earthy, rustic style of rose, not in the elegant or delicate fashion. Very Good. About $13.
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Calera Vin Gris of Pinot Noir 2013, Central Coast. 14.7% alc. 466 cases. Bright copper-peach color; think of this as a cadet pinot noir in the form of a rosé; currants and plums, raspberry with a bit of briery rasp; notes of smoke and dried Provencal herbs, hints of pomegranate and orange zest; very clean, fresh and vibrant with a damp limestone foundation. Excellent. About $17.
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Dunstan Durell Vineyard Rosé of Pinot Noir 2013, Sonoma Coast. 13% alc. 92 cases. Light but bright copper-salmon-topaz hue; strawberries and red currants, both fresh and dried, blood orange, note of pomegranate; lovely, lithe and supple but energized by brisk acidity; floral element burgeons and blossoms in the glass, as in rose petals and camellias; very dry, delicate, ethereal yet with a real bedrock of limestone minerality; a touch earthier than the version of 2012. Excellent. About $25.
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Domaine de la Mordorée “La Dame Rousse” 2013, Tavel, France. 14.5% alc. 60% grenache, 10% each cinsault, syrah and mourvèdre, 5% each bourboulenc and clairette. Brilliant strawberry-copper color; strawberries, raspberries and red currants with a touch of peach; very dry and fairly robust for rosé; notes of dried herbs and summer flowers, dominant component of limestone and flint, almost tannic in effect, but overall high-toned and elegant. Excellent. About $30.
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Notorious Pink 2013, Vin de France. Alc% NA. 100% grenache. (Domaine la Colombette) Better to call this one Innocuous Pink. Carries delicacy to the point of attenuation; very pale onion skin color; faintest tinge of strawberry, bare hint of orange zest and limestone; fairly neutral all the way round. Comes in an upscale frosted bottle, woo-hoo. Good. About $20.
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Stinson Vineyards Rosé 2013, Virginia, USA. 12% alc. 100 percent mourvèdre. 120 cases. Ruddy onion skin hue; fresh strawberries and raspberries with cloves and slightly dusty graphite in the back; notes of orange pekoe tea and dried red currants; a little fleshy and floral; bright acidity and a mild limestone-like finish. Very Good+. About $18.
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Robert Turner Wines Mosaic Rosé of Pinot Noir 2013, Santa Lucia Highlands. 14% alc. With 15% cabernet franc. 25 cases. Pale copper-onion skin color; musky and dusky melon, raspberry and strawberry with notes of pomegranate and rhubarb; finely-knit texture, delicate, elegant, lively, with a honed limestone finish. Excellent. About $22.
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