Grenache


I say “affordable” because this French company, overseen by managing director Christian Seely, owns a group of high-powered properties whose products are not to be mentioned in the same sentence with the word “cheap.” AXA’s estates include the Bordeaux chateaux of Pichon Longueville Baron (Second growth in the 1855 Classification) and Pibran in Paulillac, Suduiraut (First growth) in Sauternes and Petit-Village in Pomerol; the distinguished Domaine de L’Arlot in Burgundy; Disznóko in Hungary, producer of top-notch Tokaj; and Quinto do Noval, one of the oldest — dating back to 1715 — and most prestigious Port properties in the Douro Valley. Man and woman cannot, however, live by expensive wine alone, so the company provides, from its outpost in the Languedoc and from Noval (table wine, not Port), less costly products that mere mortals can afford and enjoy. These are imported by Vintus LLC in Pleasantville, N.Y. and were, in this case, samples for review.
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So, the Cedro do Noval 2009 is a blend of 50 percent touriga nacional grapes, 30 percent touriga franca, 10 percent tinta roriz (known as tempranillo in Spain) and 10 percent syrah, and it’s the minor inclusion of the syrah that prevents this wine from carrying a Douro designation, syrah not being an allowed grape in that famous river valley. Thus the designation Vinho Regional Duriense, a term, I confess, that I have not seen until now. The color is a youthful dark ruby purple, and at almost five years old, the wine is notably fresh, pure and lively. Aromas of cedar, dried rosemary and its slightly resinous nature, dried thyme, spiced and macerated plums and red and black currants open to deeper touches of dusty graphite. Cedro do Noval 2009 defines robust and rustic, embodying a hearty, full-bodied character in its dense, chewy texture and ripe, deeply spicy and savory red and black fruit flavors; a supple structure emboldened by 18 months in French oak barrels is permeated by earthy, leathery tannins. 14 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018 to ’20 with the heartiest of grilled, roasted or braised meats. Very Good+. About $22.
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A blend of 60 percent syrah grapes, 30 percent grenache and 10 percent mourvèdre, Mas Belles Eaux “Les Coteaux” 2009, Languedoc, aged 15 months in one-to-three-year-old French oak barrels. The color is dark ruby with a magenta tinge at the rim; expressive aromas of ripe plums, cherries and blackberries are deeply spicy and laden with hints of lavender and potpourri, cloves and sandalwood, notes of leather, briers and brambles, all for an effect that’s both earthy and exotic. As was the case with the Cedro do Noval 09, this wine, at five years old, is fresh and clean and appealing, offering tasty plum and currant flavors infused with hints of dried spice and flowers and dusty graphite and supported by a structure of vibrant acidity and moderately firm tannins. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2016 to ’18 with roasted veal, coq au vin, rabbit fricassee. Excellent. About $20.
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Oddly enough, I haven’t written about Tres Picos Borsao since the 2005 vintage, a situation I now remedy because it’s one of the world’s great wine bargains. Made from 100 percent garnacha (or grenache) grapes in Spain’s Campo de Borja region, Tres Picos Borsao 2012 aged a few months half in stainless steel, half in French oak barrels. The color is intense dark ruby; aromas of ripe red and black currants and plums are permeated by notes of graphite and cloves, briers and brambles. On the palate, the wine is rich, spicy and dense, enlivened by spanking acidity and framed by moderately grainy, chewy tannins; a few moments in the glass add touches of black olives, smoked tea and dried rosemary to the savory red and black fruit flavors. This is vivacious without being flirty and robust without being rustic; it would be perfect with grilled chorizo sausages, leg of lamb, roasted peppers and such. Alcohol content not available. Drink now through 2015 or ’16. Very Good+. About $17, representing Great Value, and seen as low as $13 or $14.

A Jorge Ordoñez Selection, tasted at a local distributor’s event.

I think I’ll name my next rock group “Eclectic Plethora,” but be that as it may, today I offer again a bunch of rosé wines, from various regions of France and California, in hopes of convincing My Readers not to abandon rosés simply because Labor Day has come and gone. While the most delicate rosés may be most appropriate in High Summer, even they can serve a purpose throughout the rest of the year. More robust and versatile rosés can be consumed with a variety of foods, and by “robust” I don’t mean blockbusters a few shades less stalwart than cabernet sauvignon or zinfandel, I just mean rosés that deliver a bit more body and fruit than the most delicate. As is my habit in these “Weekend Wine Notes,” I don’t include reams of technical, historical or geographical information, much as that sort of data makes our hearts go pitty-pat, because the intention here is to offer quick and incisive reviews that will pique your interest and tempt your palate. Unless otherwise indicated, these were samples for review. Enjoy!
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Chateau de Campuget “Tradition de Campuget” Rosé 2013, Costières de Nîmes. 13% alc. 70% syrah, 30% grenache (according to the label); 50% syrah, 50 % grenache blanc (according to the press release). Pale onion skin color; delicate hints of strawberries and watermelon, ephemeral notes of dried herbs and dusty-flint minerality; quite dry, crisp and spare; a flush of floral nuance. The most ethereal of this group of rosé wines, yet bound by tensile strength. Very Good+. About $10, a Great Bargain.
Dreyfus, Ashby, New York.
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Laurent Miquel “Pere et Fils” Cinsault Syrah 2013, Pays d’Oc. 12.5% alc. 80% cinsault, 20% syrah. The palest flush of pink imaginable; raspberry, red currants, celery seed, dried thyme; clean and crisp, a resonant note of limestone minerality; the cinsault lends a vibrant spine of keen acidity. Simple style but enjoyable, especially at the price. Very Good. About $11.
Frederick Wildman and Sons, New York.
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Domaine Les Aphillanthes Rosé 2013, Côtes du Rhône. 13% alc. Cinsault, grenache, counoise, mourvèdre. Slightly ruddy copper-salmon color; raspberries and strawberries, hints of peach and melon; slightly herbal; very dry and crisp with tides of flint and limestone minerality and vibrant acidity; appealing texture, clean and elegant. Excellent. About $14, representing Good Value.
Peter Weygandt Selection, Weygandt-Metzler, Unionville, Penn.
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Domaine de Mourchon “Loubié” Rosé 2013, Seguret, Côtes du Rhône Villages. 12.5% alc. 60% grenache, 40% syrah. Entrancing pale salmon-peach color; very clean and fresh, with notes of raspberries and red cherries, a hint of melon; an earthy touch of raspiness and cherry stems; almost a shimmer of limestone minerality and crisp acidity, yet with a lovely enfolding texture; finish offers hints of cloves and dried thyme. Exemplary balance and tone. Excellent. About $16 to $18.
Cynthia Hurley French Wines, West Newton, Mass.
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Chateau d’Aqueria 2012, Tavel. 14% alc. 50% grenache, 12% each syrah, cinsault and clairette, 8% mourvèdre, 5% boueboulenc, 1% picpoul. Ruddy salmon-peach color; the ripest and fleshiest of these rosé wines; spiced and macerated strawberries and raspberries, notes of cloves and cardamom, dusty dried field herbs (garrigue); fairly robust and vigorous; quite dry, almost austere, but juicy with spice and limestone-inflected red fruit flavors. The 2013 version of this wine in on the market, but I was sent 2012 as a sample, so drink up. Very Good+. About $18.
Kobrand Corp., Purchase, N.Y.
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McCay Cellars Rosé 2013, Lodi. 12.5% alc. Primarily old vine carignane with some grenache. 253 cases. Lovely peach-salmon color; subdued peach, melon and strawberry aromas, hints of red currants and pomegranate and a note of rose petal; subtle, clean, refreshing but with incisive acidity and considerable limestone minerality, a dusty brambly element as complement to a texture that’s both supple and spare. Beautifully done. Excellent. About $18.
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Baudry-Dutour “Cuvee Marie Justine” Chinon 2013, Val de Loire. 12.5 % alc. 100% cabernet franc. Very pale onion skin hue; delicate and slightly dusty hints of strawberries and red currants; notes of dried herbs and spice, just a touch of a floral component, violets or lilacs; crisp and lively acidity, an animated element of limestone minerality; cool, clean and refreshing but revealing a scant bit of loamy earthiness on the finish. beautifully knit. Very Good+. About $20, my purchase.
William Harrison Imports, Manassas, Va.
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Tablas Creek Vineyard Patelin de Tablas Rosé 2013, Paso Robles. 14.1% alc. 73% grenache, 22% mourvèdre, 5% counoise. 1,540 cases. Classic pale onion-skin hue; smoke, dust, damp flint and limestone; dried currants and raspberries, deeply earthy and minerally; hints of melon and mulberry; a beguiling combination of opulence and austerity, hitting all the right notes of balance and intrigue. Excellent. About $22, my purchase.
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Copain Wines “Tous Ensemble” Rosé of Pinot Noir 2013, Anderson Valley. 12.7% alc. 100% pinot noir. 1,435 cases. Pale salmon-copper color; raspberry, melon, sour cherry, very pure and fresh; provocative acidity and scintillating limestone minerality keep it brisk and breezy; lovely balance between chiseled spareness and lush elegance. One of California’s best rosés. Excellent. About $24, my purchase.
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All sorts of reasons exist to justify our interest in wine — wine tastes great, on its own and with food; wine is a complicated beverage that encourages thought and contemplation; wine gets you drunk — and one of those reasons is the story behind the wine. Now not all wines have compelling stories. The cheap wine fostered in vast vineyards in California’s Central Valley and raised in giant tanks on megalithic farms generally does not offer a fascinating back-story. And financially-padded collectors don’t suck up cases of Chateau Latour and Haut Brion because of the histories of those august properties.

This pair of rosé wines, however, tells one of those tales of a dream long-striven for and finally accomplished. When I mention that the wines derive from the Cotes de Provence appellation in the South of France by a couple who never made wine before, My Readers may rise to their feet and let loose a chorus of “Brad and Angelina!” but no, I am not speaking of the (excellent) celebrity rosé Miraval, now in its second vintage, but of the slightly older Mirabeau, the brain-child of Stephen Cronk, an Englishman who gave up his job in telecommunications and house in Teddington in southwest London — motto: “We’re in southwest London!” — and moved his family to the village of Contignac in Provence for the purpose of growing grapes and making rosé wines. Cronk did not possess the fame, notoriety, influence and fiduciary prowess of the Pitt/Jolie cohort, but he did manifest a large portion of grit, married, inevitably, to naivete. (This is also a great-looking family; they could be making a ton of dough in commercials. Image from the winery website.)

Cronk discovered that he couldn’t afford to purchase vineyard land, even at the height of the recession, so he settled for being a negociant, buying grapes from growers that he searched for diligently and with the help and advice of Master of Wine Angela Muir. Five years after he began the process, his Mirabeau brand is sold in 10 countries and is now available in two versions in the U.S.A.

Mirabeau “Classic” Rosé 2013, Côtes de Provence, is a blend of grenache, syrah and vermentino grapes that offers an alluring pale copper-salmon color and enticing aromas of fresh strawberries and raspberries with hints of dried red currants and cloves and a barely discernible note of orange rind and lime peel. The wine slides across the palate with crisp vivacity yet with a touch of lush red fruit in a well-balanced structure that includes a finishing element of dried herbs and limestone. 13 percent alcohol. A very attractive, modestly robust rosé for drinking with picnic fare such as cold fried chicken, deviled eggs, cucumber sandwiches — or a rabbit terrine with a loaf of crusty bread. Very Good+. About $16.

The Mirabeau Pure Rosé 2013, Côtes de Provence, is a different sort of creature. A blend of 50 percent grenache, 40 percent syrah and 10 percent vermentino, this classic is elegant, high-toned and spare, delicate but spun with tensile strength and the tension of steely acidity. The color is the palest onion skin or “eye of the partridge”; hints of strawberry and peach, lilac, lime peel and almond skin in a texture that practically shimmers with limestone and flint minerality; rather than lush, this is chiseled, faceted, a gem-like construct that still manages to satisfy in a sensual and exhilarating measure. 13.5 percent alcohol. We drank this over several evenings as an aperitif while cooking and snacking. Excellent. About $22.

Seaview Imports, Port Washington, N.Y. Samples for review. Bottle image by Hans Aschim from coolhunting.com.

Today’s notes feature eight rosé wines, four from France, three from California and one from the state of Virginia. In style they range from ephemeral to fairly robust. I have to take shots at a couple of these examples, but those are the breaks in the realm of wine reviewing. No attempt at technical, historical, geographical or personal information here (you know, the stuff I really dote on); instead, the intent is to pique your interest and whet your palate. Except for the Calera Vin Gris of Pinot Noir 2013, these were samples for review. Enjoy!
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Chateau de Berne Terres de Berne Rosé 2013, Côtes de Provence, France. 13% alc. 50% each grenache and cinsault. Very pale onion skin hue, almost shimmers; light kisses of strawberry, peach and orange rind, hints of dried thyme; bone-dry, crisp and vibrant, loads of scintillating limestone minerality. Really well-made and enjoyable but packaged in an annoying over-designed bottle that’s too tall to fit on a refrigerator shelf. Excellent. About $20.
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Bila-Haut Rosé 2013, Pays d’Oc, France. 13.5% alc. Cinsault and grenache. (From M. Chapoutier) Pretty copper-salmon color; orange zest and raspberries, dusty minerals, notes of rose petals and lavender; quite dry, with limestone austerity, a fairly earthy, rustic style of rose, not in the elegant or delicate fashion. Very Good. About $13.
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Calera Vin Gris of Pinot Noir 2013, Central Coast. 14.7% alc. 466 cases. Bright copper-peach color; think of this as a cadet pinot noir in the form of a rosé; currants and plums, raspberry with a bit of briery rasp; notes of smoke and dried Provencal herbs, hints of pomegranate and orange zest; very clean, fresh and vibrant with a damp limestone foundation. Excellent. About $17.
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Dunstan Durell Vineyard Rosé of Pinot Noir 2013, Sonoma Coast. 13% alc. 92 cases. Light but bright copper-salmon-topaz hue; strawberries and red currants, both fresh and dried, blood orange, note of pomegranate; lovely, lithe and supple but energized by brisk acidity; floral element burgeons and blossoms in the glass, as in rose petals and camellias; very dry, delicate, ethereal yet with a real bedrock of limestone minerality; a touch earthier than the version of 2012. Excellent. About $25.
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Domaine de la Mordorée “La Dame Rousse” 2013, Tavel, France. 14.5% alc. 60% grenache, 10% each cinsault, syrah and mourvèdre, 5% each bourboulenc and clairette. Brilliant strawberry-copper color; strawberries, raspberries and red currants with a touch of peach; very dry and fairly robust for rosé; notes of dried herbs and summer flowers, dominant component of limestone and flint, almost tannic in effect, but overall high-toned and elegant. Excellent. About $30.
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Notorious Pink 2013, Vin de France. Alc% NA. 100% grenache. (Domaine la Colombette) Better to call this one Innocuous Pink. Carries delicacy to the point of attenuation; very pale onion skin color; faintest tinge of strawberry, bare hint of orange zest and limestone; fairly neutral all the way round. Comes in an upscale frosted bottle, woo-hoo. Good. About $20.
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Stinson Vineyards Rosé 2013, Virginia, USA. 12% alc. 100 percent mourvèdre. 120 cases. Ruddy onion skin hue; fresh strawberries and raspberries with cloves and slightly dusty graphite in the back; notes of orange pekoe tea and dried red currants; a little fleshy and floral; bright acidity and a mild limestone-like finish. Very Good+. About $18.
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Robert Turner Wines Mosaic Rosé of Pinot Noir 2013, Santa Lucia Highlands. 14% alc. With 15% cabernet franc. 25 cases. Pale copper-onion skin color; musky and dusky melon, raspberry and strawberry with notes of pomegranate and rhubarb; finely-knit texture, delicate, elegant, lively, with a honed limestone finish. Excellent. About $22.
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Though I have been writing about the wines made by Gideon Beinstock for 20 years, I met him for the first time three weeks ago at a dinner party in the Sierra Foothills, northeast of Sacramento. Around dusk, a group of us were sitting outside, and Beinstock opened a bottle of his Clos Saron Out of the Blue 2013, a blend of 90 percent cinsault and five percent each syrah and graciano grapes. This was also my first encounter with a wine under the Clos Saron label, which he and his wife Saron Rice launched in 1996, while he was winemaker for Renaissance Vineyard and Winery. You know how it is, friends. You sniff a wine, take a sip, and you know that this is the real thing, an amalgam of such intensity and expansiveness, of such vibrancy and resonance that most other wines seem amateurish in comparison. The next day, I visited Clos Saron and tasted through the winery’s currant releases and wines in the barrel. My colleagues on this occasion were Gary Paul Fox, owner and winemaker of Bangor Ranch Vineyard & Winery, and Cara Zujewski, who with her partner Aaron Mockrish, operates the local Three Cedars Ranch, she doing produce, he raising sheep.

The Israeli-French Beinstock arrived at what became Renaissance in the 1970s and helped plant the original vines. He spent most of the 1980s working in vineyards in Burgundy and the Rhone Valley. and when he returned to Yuba County, he took the position as assistant winemaker to Diane Werner, widow of the estate’s first winemaker Karl Werner. Beinstock became winemaker for Renaissance in 1994, a job he held until 2011. He told me that for his last few years at Renaissance, his “heart was not in it,” and he extricated himself from the Fellowship of Friends, the spiritual organization that owns the estate, and took up the reins of Clos Saron full-time.

Clos Saron occupies a rustic compound near the community of Oregon House — motto: “We’re not actually in Oregon!” — where the structure in which he and his wife and children live lies a few steps from the winery. The Home Vineyard extends practically from their front door down a slight slope. Also on site are sheep, chickens and geese. Beinstock’s methodology is about as minimal as winemaking gets. The winery possesses neither a crusher nor a destemmer; all crushing is done by foot-stomping, and fermentation takes place with stems in open-top casks; because of the stems, fermentation is relatively short, that is, four to 10 days. Grapes are not inoculated with commercial yeast, but fermentation is impelled by natural yeast on the grape skins. Acidity is never “corrected.” New oak makes no appearance at Clos Saron. Battonage (stirring) and racking do not occur while wines are in barrel; wines are only racked directly to bottle. Sulfur dioxide is applied at a minimum degree, 20/25 parts per million. Red wines are neither fined nor filtered.

The result, to my palate, are wines that display a remarkable measure of authenticity and integrity, purity and intensity, the exhilarating quality of a wine that goes almost directly from the vineyard to the glass. I asked Beinstock if he missed working with cabernet sauvignon, the grape that put Renaissance on the map, admittedly a small map considering the limited production. He said, “Truly, what I’m most fascinated with is soil, not the grape. I worked with cabernet at Renaissance because of the microclimate. It’s one of the world’s best sites for cabernet. Here I work with different grapes because of the location. A lean soil over layers of volcanic ash and decomposed granite.” The Home Vineyard slopes gently to the northeast at 1600 feet above sea-level.

How do you find these wines, usually made in a total quantity of about 800 cases a year? They’re available at a handful of restaurants and retailers in California, New York and around Boston and Washington D.C.; or from the winery website: clossaron.com

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Current and recent releases:
>Clos Saron Syrah 2013. An experimental blend of Stone Soup syrah with 30 percent (white) verdejo; powerful, very spicy and fruity; seductive body and texture. $NA.
>Clos Saron Stone Soup Syrah 2013. Inky purple, penetrating graphite and granitic minerality; very intense and concentrated, very spicy. Try 2017 or ’18 through 2023 to ’25. Typically 60 to 150 cases. About $50
>Clos Saron Stone Soup Syrah 2012. A touch more open and approachable than the ’13; slightly fleshy and meaty, grounded in iodine and iron, bright acidity; fresh with ambient elegance. 2015 through 2025. About $50
>Out of the Blue 2013. 90 percent cinsault, 5 percent syrah, 5 percent graciano. The cinsault vines were planted in 1885, and the vineyard is still owned by the same family. Lovely heft and body, profoundly lively, vibrant and appealing; black and blue fruit scents and flavors, permeated by briers and brambles, graphite and dusty tannins. Approximately 170 cases. About $30.
>A Deeper Shade of Blue 2013. 56 percent syrah, 38 percent old vine grenache, 6 percent verdejo. Quite spicy and minerally, currants and blueberries and plums, slightly macerated and roasted; smooth and polished but earthy, rooty, slightly granitic. About $35.
>Pinot Noir 2011. Grapes from the Home Vineyard. Dark ruby with a violet tinge; deeply earthy and minerally, a bit of iron; but fresh and clean and penetrating, currant and plum fruit, tremendous presence, vibrancy and tenacity; dusty tannins but sleek supple texture; one of the most individual and expressive pinot noirs I have tasted. Approximately 108 cases. About $60.
>Stone Soup Syrah 2011. Awesome purity, intensity and concentration; you feel the rock-strew soil of that precipitous vineyard, the deep foundation of tannin and acidity, the cut and edge of graphite, the spareness and elegance yet the paradoxically voluptuous aura of ripe blackberries, currants and plums. Approximately 104 cases. About $50.
>Heart of Stone Syrah 2009. With 10 percent viognier. Very earthy, piercing graphite minerality, deeply and darkly spicy, intense and concentrated, black and blue fruit; powerhouse acidity and tannin, briery and brambly, root-like; incredibly supple texture. 125 cases. About $45.
>Cuvee Mysterieuse 2009. 64 percent syrah, 30 percent merlot, 6 percent viognier. Lovely, rich and warm but intense, well-knit, vibrant, supple, resonant; quite floral, very spicy, earthy and imbued with a huge lithic minerally component. About 96 cases. Price $45.
>Black Pearl 2008. 65 percent syrah, 27 percent cabernet sauvignon, 6 percent petit verdot, 2 percent merlot. Ripe, spicy and minerally; black and red cherries and currants with a touch of plum; smoky, briers and brambles, touch of old leather, dusty tannins, vibrant acidity. Approximately 97 cases. About $45.
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From the barrel:

First, we tried a couple of wines made from fruit purchased in Lodi, a Tickled Pink Rose 2013 that won’t be released until 2015, 100 percent graciano grapes, a dry, spare, elegant and intellectual rose; and the Carte Blanche 2013, a half-half blend of verdelho and albarino grapes that builds remarkable density and character in the glass while remaining bright, clean, fresh and elevating.

Then, we moved on to the components of pinot noirs from 2013 and 2012, getting an impression of what the separate blocks or lots in the vineyard offer.

For 2013, the North Block (planted in 1999) is a radiant dark purple hue, deep and spicy, with notes of lavender and violets, very dry, bastions of tannin. The South Block is quite earthy and loamy, delivering rooty briers and brambles and tannins that are dominant but not punishing. The Lower Block is indeed the “blockiest,” the most inchoate and unformed, even feral. Older Block, grafted in 1995 to cabernet stock planted in 1980 and interplanted between, feels the most complete and comprehensible as pinot noir, very dry, with spanking acidity but with spice and violets and lovely fruit. Finally, in this group, we tasted the Pinot Noir 2013 that’s a blend of these separate blocks, a wine that’s inky-purple, very dry, impressively vibrant and resonant and starting to be expressive.

For 2012, the North Block offers a hint of floral character but is incredibly intense and concentrated and wrapped by tight tannins. Lower Block is deep, dark and spicy, roiling with earth and loam and quite tannic. Older Block delivers a thread of spice, dried flowers and black fruit through the vibrant acidity and minerally tannins. The blend of these three vineyards — we didn’t taste the 2012 from South Block — felt almost like real pinot noir, complete, confident, both deep and elevating.

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Imagine being so famous that people can use your first name and everyone knows who they’re talking about. As in: “Fredric just posted to his blog,” and billions of earthlings go “oooohhh” and “aaaahhh.” Anyway, as multitudes are aware, the Hollywood stars Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, in partnership with the Perrin family of Chateau de Beaucastel in Chateauneuf-du-Pape, last year released the first wine from their Chateau Miraval property, a Côtes de Provence Rosé 2012. I didn’t try that wine but we just drank the second release, the Chateau Miraval 2013, and it’s a honey. Every aspect of this product is thoughtfully and exquisitely executed, including the elegant bottle that resembles an old-style Champagne bottle, and the understated, even reticent label. The wine is a blend of the red cinsault, grenache and syrah grapes with a dollop of the white rolle, the Italian vermentino. The entrancing color is the palest copper-onion skin-topaz with the faintest pink flush; aromas of fresh strawberries and dried red currants are subtly woven with notes of dried thyme, flint and limestone, with a hint of tangerine. Though in its nuanced red fruit flavors this rose is slightly savory and saline, it embodies the utmost in delicate and ineffable character, while retaining the vibrancy of definitive acidity and the vitality of a scintillating mineral element. Compulsively drinkable, and without the taint of amateurish that often comes with “celebrity” wines; this is the real thing. 13 percent alcohol. Excellent. Prices around the country range from about $24 to $30.

Imported by Vineyard Brands, Birmingham, Ala. Sample provided by a local retailer.

Sliding a medium rare leg of lamb studded with garlic and rosemary from the grill? How about pork chops doused with olive oil and soy sauce and rubbed with cumin and chili powder? You carnivores getting hungry? How about opening a bottle of Eric Texier Côtes du Rhône 2011 to accompany these primal dishes? That would be a good idea. Texier, a nuclear engineer turned winemaker, takes a meticulous approach to his wines, whether estate-grown or made from grapes purchased on long-term contract. His methods in the vineyard are organic, his techniques in the winery traditional and minimal. This wine is a blend of about 80 percent grenache with the remainder portions of the white grapes grenache blanc, clairette and bourboulenc. Texier tends to age his reds in neutral barrels and large old futs. The color is an entrancing medium ruby hue with a tinge of violet; aromas of lightly spiced and macerated raspberries and red and black currants are woven with elements of briers and brambles and dusty graphite; a few moments in the glass bring in notes of plums, leather and lavender. This is a dry wine, a bit raspy with slightly knotty tannins, but eminently drinkable and tasty with red and black fruit flavors, all bolstered by clean, bright acidity and an underlying granitic mineral quality. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2016 or ’17. Very Good+. About $15.

Imported by Louis/Dressner, New York. A sample for review. Label image from hogsheadwine.

Though the grape and wine industry in the High Plains of Texas goes back only 40 years, it has already spawned a pedigree, at least in this sense. Kim McPherson, owner of his eponymous winery in Lubbock, is the son of the legendary “Doc” McPherson, founder, in 1976, along with Bob Reed, of LLano Estacado, the region’s first winery. In fact, these two remain the only wineries in the High Plains, a dry, flat, wind-swept terrain into which hedge-fund millionaires and ex-CEOs do not come parachuting and buying up land to make expensive cult wines. There are 35 grape-growers here, according to the website of the High Plains Grape Growers Association, and they tend to live in modest farm-houses with their families and raise such row-crops as cotton, sorghum and peanuts in addition to grapes.

McPherson Cellars occupies a building in Lubbock that was erected in the 1930s as the local Coca-Cola bottling facility. Though extensively remodeled, its wide-open spaces and high ceilings made it ideal for refurbishing into a winery. I visited McPherson Cellars three weeks ago and tasted through a range of the winery’s products, a line-up that illustrates the shift in High Plains from “classic” grapes such as chardonnay, merlot and cabernet sauvignon — the climate really isn’t suited — to more amenable varieties likes viognier, marsanne and roussanne for white and grenache, carignan, mourvèdre and tempranillo for red. In other words, grapes we associate with Spain, Italy and the south of France, the Mediterranean basin. Tempranillo, particularly, is looked on as the grape that will put High Plains on the vinous map.

The pricing for McPherson wines reflects its owner and winemaker’s comment that he is “the workingman’s friend,” to which he added, “I love screw-caps.” Neither expression should persuade tasters that his wines are down-market in quality, because they’re not; they are, mainly, delightful and charming, and they edge, in some cases, into serious structure.
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McPherson offered 504 cases of a sparkling wine — sold out at the winery — from 87 percent riesling and 13 percent vermentino grapes grown in High Plains, though the product was made by his brother Jon McPherson in Temecula via the Charmat process. Though pleasant enough, it felt a bit heavy and needed more cut and minerality. Good+. Price N/A.
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The next wine, however, I found exemplary. This was the McPherson Les Copains Rosé 2013, with a Texas rather than a High Plains designation, a blend of 55 percent cinsault, 30 percent mourvèdre and 15 percent viognier. A fount of delicacy and elegance, this rose was pungent with notes of strawberries and raspberries, lilac and lavender, and it displayed deft acidity and limestone minerality. 12.9 percent alcohol. Production was 480 cases. Excellent. About $11.
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The Tres Colore 2013 is a blend of carignan and mourvèdre with a touch of viognier. This is a lovely quaff, medium ruby color with a blush of magenta, fresh, briery and brambly, intensely raspberry-ish with some of the “rasp,” a hint of rose petal and good balance and acidity. 13.9 percent alcohol. 934 cases. Very Good. About $12 to $14.
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The white Les Copains 2012 is a blend of 45 percent viognier, 35 roussanne, 16 grenache blanc and 4 marsanne; I mean, we might as well be in the southern Rhone Valley. The color is medium gold, and the seductive aromas weave notes of jasmine and honeysuckle, peach, pear and papaya; very spicy stone fruit flavors are rent by pert acidity and limestone elements, while a few minutes in the glass bring in hints of dusty lilac and Evening in Paris cologne. Very charming. 13.9 percent alcohol. 616 cases. Very Good+. About $13.
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La Herencia Red Table Wine 2012 is a blend of 75 percent tempranillo, 9 percent syrah, 6 mourvèdre and 5 percent each grenache and carignan. This wine is characterized by pinpoint balance among a smooth and supple texture, graphite minerality, juicy red and black fruit flavors and bright acidity. A highly perfumed bouquet exudes hints of macerated red and black currants, orange rind and pomegranate. Another charming and drinkable wine, though with a steady spine of structure. It aged 14 months in new and neutral French oak barrels. 13.9 percent alcohol. 986 cases. Very Good+. About $14.
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McPherson also turns out 100 cases of Chansa Solera Reserve Single Cream Sherry that ages two years in American oak barrels. It’s made from chenin blanc and French colombard grapes. With its dark amber color, its notes of toffee and toasted coconut, cloves and allspice, bitter chocolate and roasted almonds, its sweet entry but bracing, saline finish, this is a pleasant way to end a meal. 16.5 percent alcohol. Very Good+. About $28.
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When I begin a post that way — “Worth a Search” — you know, My Readers, that the wines under review are limited in production. That’s certainly true of these three examples from Idlewild Wines, a project run by Sam Bilbro and Jessica Boone Bilbro. There’s a certain pedigree; Sam’s father, Chris Bilbro, started Marietta cellars in 1979, and Sam grew up in the wine business. Jessica has a degree in zoology but fell in love with winemaking and worked at Edgewood Estate, Armida Winery and Passalacqua. Idlewild is a small young winery at the vanguard of what’s most important in California now. No chardonnay or sauvignon blanc, no cabernet sauvignon or pinot noir is made here. Instead, we have out-of-the-way French and Italian grape varieties like grenache gris, arneis, cortese. Alcohol levels are moderate. New oak dares not show its face. Meticulous attention to detail is made, yet the wines are more nurtured and encouraged than manipulated. Prices are reasonable. I am, frankly, deeply enamored of these wines and wish that they were made in quantities to render them more accessible to My Readers. That not being the case, you’ll have to search them out. They’re lovely wines for drinking this Summer.

These wines were samples for review. Images from idlewildwines.com

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The Yorkville Highlands AVA, in Mendocino County, was approved in 1998. Its rocky outcroppings separate Mendocino’s Anderson Valley from Sonoma County’s Alexander Valley. The Idlewild Vin Gris 2013, Yorkville Highlands, is made completely from grenache grapes briefly macerated, slowly fermented in stainless steel tanks and aged four months in neutral oak barrels. The color is very pale onion skin, almost parchment; everything is subtle and nuanced; my comment on Facebook was “Tissues of delicacy woven on a steel loom,” and I stand by that assessment. Hints of peach and yellow plum, with some of the pithiness of the stone; notes of mandarin orange and grapefruit zest; summer flowers in a dry meadow; the whole package fresh and refreshing but offering pleasing density and impact on the palate; the texture is soft and appealing but enlivened by a slap of crystalline acidity. Does rose get any better than this? Not in my book. Alcohol NA. Drink into 2015. Production was 200 cases. Excellent. About $22.
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Grenache gris is a pinkish-gray mutation of the red grenache grape, rarely found even in the South of France and then usually not made into its own wine. It is not the same as grenache blanc. The grapes for the Idlewild Grenache Gris 2013, Mendocino, derive from vines at Gibson Ranch in McDowell Valley that are more than 100 years old. The grapes were foot-trod rather than crushed mechanically; after fermentation, the wine aged four months in neutral French oak barrels. The color is radiant mulberry-tourmaline; the nose is pure raspberry and black currants with hints of rose petals, rhubarb and pomegranate, summer meadows, pomander (cloves, allspice and citrus). A few moments in the glass bring in notes of tomato skin and slightly mushroomy earthiness; this is very much a wine of the garden and the fields, lightly herbal and savory and altogether wild and alluring. In style, it resembles a Bordeaux clairette, falling between a rose and a light-bodied red wine. 12.9 percent alcohol. Truly lovely and unusual. Drink through 2015. Production was 230 cases. Excellent. About $22.
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Not much arneis is grown in the U.S.A., but the wine that Sam Bilbro and Jessica Boone Bilbro make from the Fox Hill Vineyard, southeast of Ukiah, on Mendocino’s Talmage Bench, rivals many of the examples that I have tasted from Piedmont, the grape’s home. The color of the Idlewild Fox Hill Vineyard Arneis 2013, Mendocino, is brilliant light gold; aromas of bees’-wax, lanolin, honeysuckle and jasmine are wreathed with spiced pear, along with a slightly honeyed aura and almond notes. The wine is dry, silky and supple, laid over a foundation of dusky earthy and herbal elements, lime and roasted lemon flavors and a touch of grapefruit bitterness and limestone on the finish; some time in the glass brings hints of lychee and mango to the fore. A beguiling blend of limpid transparency and steel-like scaffolding. 13.6 percent alcohol. Production was 145 cases. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $28.
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