Grenache


This delightful and classic rosé wine originates from Domaine Saint Mitre, in the wine region of Coteaux Varois en Provence, in the far southeastern strip of France where the vineyards hug the shores and the inland hills above the Mediterranean, curving from Marseilles halfway to Nice. The estate, about 30 hectares (some 75 acres) dates back to 1817. The blend of the Saint Mitre Clos Madon 2014 is 75 percent grenache grapes and 25 percent cinsault. The color is very pale, slightly pinkish onion skin; aromas of fresh strawberries, just-sliced watermelon and lilac are permeated by notes of apple skin, heather and dried thyme. The wine is lively, crisp but not tart, and sports a lovely lip-smacking texture that’s just a bit more spare than lush. It’s savory, a touch saline, and offers wisps of cloves and pink grapefruit on the finish dominated by limestone minerality and flush with red berry flavors. Really tasty and gratifying, and at 13 percent alcohol, it goes down easily. If this one doesn’t conjure the warm, carefree pleasures of Provence — or how you imagine them to be — nothing will. Excellent. About $20, a local purchase.

Imported by Matinicus Wines, Beverly Hills, Fla.

In days gone by, we legions of wine-writers would lament the fact that nobody but us appreciated rosé wines and how wonderful they are and how versatile. We would deplore the notion that everyone in America associated rosé wines with sweetness — and the worst were sweet — when actually the best rosés are quite dry. That’s not the case now, when rosés have grown immensely popular and many wineries all over the world turn out the things as major or side projects, sometimes very seriously. Rosé wines have improved too, being generally made in clean, fresh, crisp mineral-infused fashion. Don’t worry about rosés, friends, they can take care of themselves. I offer today 10 examples of rosé wines made from a variety of grapes in differing styles, most tending toward pleasure and delight, although a couple invite more thoughtful contemplation. They’re not just for Spring and Summer either; several of these models carry enough heft and character to be consumed throughout the year, though you can’t beat them for picnics and backyard fetes in fine weather. Enjoy! In moderation, of course.

These wines were samples for review.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Domaine Saint-Aix AIX Rosé 2014, Coteaux d’Aix en Provence, France. 12.5% alc. Grenache, cinsault, syrah, counoise. Very pale pink, like the inside of a seashell; ineffable fragrance of dried strawberries and red currants assisted by mild notes of cloves and thyme; brisk acidity blows through it like a sea-breeze on damp limestone; lavender and orange zest in the background, all delicately chiseled and faceted. Excellent. About $19.
Imported by Massanois LLC, Scarsdale, N.Y.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Chateau Notre Dame du Quatourze Rosé 2014, Languedoc, France. 13% alc. Cinsault, grenache, syrah. Salmon-peach color; peach and strawberry, nicely ripe, slightly dusty terra cotta touch; pomegranate with a notes of cloves; limestone and dried herbs. Tasty and attractive. Very Good+. About $NA .
Imported by Val d’Orbieu America, New York.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Chateau de Jonquieres Cuvee Cersius Rosé 2014, Languedoc, France. …% alc. Cinsault, grenache, syrah. A pale pink shimmer; delicate and elegant, fine bones; rose hips and strawberries, notes of raspberries and orange zest; crystalline acidity and gravel-like minerality; quite dry but distinctly though ethereally flavorful. Lovely. Very Good+. About $NA .
Imported by Val d’Orbieu America, New York.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Los Vascos Rosé 2014, Colchagua, Chile. Les Domaines Barons de Rothschild (Lafite) 13.5% alc. 90% cabernet sauvignon, 10% syrah. Light salmon-pink color with a tinge of magenta; a summery burst of pure strawberry and raspberry; warm and spicy, racy acidity; a touch of plums garnished with dusty graphite and a dash of dried thyme; lovely shape and presence. Excellent. About $14, representing Great Value.
Pasternak Wine Imports, Harrison, N.Y.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MacPhail Family Wines Rosé of Pinot Noir 2014, Sonoma Coast. 14.5% alc. 100% pinot noir. 492 cases. Brilliant copper-salmon color; tomato skin and lime leaf, strawberries, raspberries and rose petals, hints of graphite and sea-salt, briers and brambles; a spicy, savory and fairly robust rose that doesn’t neglect delicacy and elegance in the upper register; lively, supple finish drenched with red fruit (hinting at the tropical) and mineral undertones. A superior rose. Exceptional. About $22.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Il Poggione Brancato 2014, Rosato di Toscana, Italy. 12.5% alcohol. 100% sangiovese. Vivid smoky topaz hue; strawberries, raspberries and peaches; a dusty, dusky minerality, like paving stones warmed by the sun; hints of cloves and dried thyme; beautiful balance between bright acidity and a moderately lush texture, but altogether spare and elegant. A gorgeous rosé, very much a presence on the palate. Excellent. About $18.
Imported by Terlato Wines International, Lake Bluff, Ill.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Chateau Ribaute “Senhal d’Aric” Rosé 2014, Corbiéres. 12.5% alc. Carignane, grenache, syrah, mourvèdre. Smoky topaz hue, slightly darker than onion skin; peach and strawberry, with a touch of raspberry in the background; warm and stony, damp roof tiles drying in sunlight — the whole “South of France” thing; ethereal but with a grounding in loam. Nicely layered for a rose. Excellent. About $NA.
Imported by Val d’Orbieu America, New York.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Stemmari Rosé 2014, Sicily. 12% alc. 100% nero d’avola grapes. Entrancing light ruby color with violet undertones; red fruit all round, with prominent strawberry and raspberry followed by notes of cherries and currants and touches of tart pomegranate and pink grapefruit; sunny, leafy, warm and spicy; refreshing and attractive; finish emphasizes brisk acidity and limestone-like crispness (with a hint of orange candied orange peel). Very Good+. About $10, a Real Bargain.
Prestige Wine Imports, New York.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Toad Hollow Vineyards “Eye of the Toad” Dry Rosé of Pinot Noir 2014, Sonoma County. 11.5% alc. 100% pinot noir. Vivid salmon-copper hue; notably fresh, clean and crisp; strawberries and rose petals, notes of pert cranberries and pomegranate; hint of orange rind; flinty texture for under-tones of minerality but lovely satiny flow on the palate. Very Good+. About $12, marking Great Value.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Two Shepherds Grenache Rosé 2014, Sonoma Coast. % alc. 100% grenache. 90 cases. The blissful incarnadine of bright ruby-cherry hue; pure raspberry with a suffusion of cherry-berry, melon ball and sour cherry; marked limestone minerality, very dry yet drenched with tart, slightly candied red fruit flavors; almost tannic yet never less than delightful and ethereal in the high notes and gradually unfolding depth unusual in a rose; finish brings in hints of apple, dried cranberry and thyme. Perfection. Exceptional. About $24.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

I’ll admit that choosing the Belleruche 2014, Côtes-du-Rhône Rosé, for Wine of the Week is a pretty obvious move. After all, it’s widely-known and available, and it’s fairly priced. Sometimes obvious choices, however, are the only ones to make, at least when they involve quality and consistency. The Belleruche Côtes-du-Rhône wines — there are also a red and a white — emerge from the M. Chapoutier stable, where their humble presence does nothing to tarnish the reputation of the company’s thoroughbreds; these are all exceedingly well-made wines, at whatever level. Belleruche 2014, Côtes-du-Rhône Rosé, is composed of grenache, syrah and cinsault grapes purchased from throughout this region of France’s southern Rhône Valley. The wine is made completely in stainless steel vats to ensure freshness and immediate appeal. The color is light but radiant salmon-peach; aromas of slightly spiced and macerated strawberries and raspberries are wedded to notes of pomegranate and pomander, with a delicate structure of lavender and limestone in the background. This is a rose that melds its delicate nature to a moderately lush texture supported by bright acidity for a thirst-quenching character; on the palate, it adds a touch of peach and tart cranberry to the red berry flavors. It’s an attractive and tasty wine in every aspect. 13 percent alcohol. Drink now through the end of 2015. If your household goes the route of baked ham for Easter luncheon, Belleruche 2014, Côtes-du-Rhône Rosé, would be perfect. Also good for such picnic fare as fried chicken, deviled eggs and (for the Anglophiles) cucumber or watercress sandwiches, crusts trimmed, if you please. Very Good+. About $16.

Imported by Terlato Wines International, Lake Bluff, Ill. A sample for review. I borrowed this image from my wine-blogger pal Benito.

Even for France, home of many venerable wine properties and vineyards, the domaine of Les Pallières qualifies as ancient, having been farmed by the same family since sometime in the 15th Century. Located in the foothills of the Dentelles de Montmirail outside the village of Gigondas in the Southern Rhone valley, the estate endured hard times in the 20th Century, and in 1998, faced with extensive repairs to the property and vineyards, the Roux brothers decided to sell. Fortunately, another pair of brothers, Daniel and Frédéric Brunier, owners of Vieux Télégraphe in Châteauneuf-du-Pape, learned about the situation and, with Kermit Lynch, their American importer, purchased the old estate and instituted a series of improvements and innovations. Particularly important was the separation, beginning in 2007, of the various lieux-dits, previously blended into one cuvée, into two distinct wines to emphasize the attributes of the terroir. Cuvée “Terrasse du Diable,” encompasses the low-yielding vines from the higher altitudes, up to 400 meters, that express great structure and intense minerality. Cuvée “Les Racines” showcases the vineyard parcels surrounding the winery—the origin of the domaine with the oldest vines—with the emphasis on freshness and an abundance of fruit. This division does not imply that Terrasse du Diable does not possess delicious fruit nor that Les Racines lacks structure.

These two wines, in their manifestations from 2010, are what I consider today. I encountered the pair at a trade tasting for Kermit Lynch products mounted by a local wholesale house. Now the current vintage on the market apparently is 2012, but distributors often showcase older wines they still have in stock at these events, hoping to interest retail stores that may have suitable costumers.

Until 1966, the wines from Gigondas were bottled as simple Côtes du Rhône; that year, they were elevated to Côtes du Rhône-Villages, and in 1971 Gigondas was awarded its own appellation. The reds must contain up to 80 percent grenache grapes, with syrah and/or mourvèdre accounting for 15 percent (though these two wines do not have that 15 percent). The other wine is rosé; whites are not produced.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Les Pallières Terrasse du Diable 2010, Gigondas, is a blend of 90 percent grenache grapes, and five percent each mourvèdre and clairette, the latter a white grape, one of those allowed in Chateauneuf-du-Pape. The vines average 45 years old and are planted on steep one-row terraces in poor soil partly covered with rocky scree, in the northernmost area of the Gigondas appellation. The grapes were fermented in concrete and wooden vats, and the wine aged 10 months in vats and another 12 months in foudres, which is to say that these are large oak barrels; no small barriques were employed. The wine was bottled unfiltered. The color is medium ruby permeated with a mulberry hue; the first impression is of a wine that lives where the Wild Things are; it feels feral, fleshy and meaty, rich, ripe and spicy, bursting with notes of red and black currants and cherries with undertones of wild plum, graphite and lightly roasted fennel; a few moments in the glass bring up traces of violets, cloves, lavender and leather. This is weighty but not heavy on the palate, quite dry and framed by a wealth of slightly sanded and dusty tannins, as if the wine had been lightly burnished and delicately brushed with sage and thyme. Though well furnished with fresh and dried red and black fruit flavors, from mid-palate through the finish, Les Pallières Terrasse du Diable 2010 builds granitic austerity, dictating a few years aging to find poise. 14.5 percent alcohol. Best from 2016 or ’17 to 2025 or ’26. Excellent. About $45.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Les Pallières Les Racines 2010, Gigondas, does not receive as much cement and wood aging as its stablemate mentioned above does. A blend of 80 percent grenache, eight percent syrah, seven percent cinsault and five percent clairette, Les Racines — “the roots” — ferments in cement cuves and large oaken foudres and then ages 10 months in cement and seven to nine months in foudres. Perhaps for that reason and a slightly lower altitude,, Les Racines ’10 feels a bit more generous and less extracted than Terrasse du Diable ’10, though no less rich in detail and dimension. This is all about ripe black fruit — blackberries, cherries and plums — supported by finely milled tannins, bright acidity and a polished graphite presence; aromas of cloves and sandalwood, violets and lavender sift from the glass in an exotic stream, while the wine flows through the mouth in a texture that’s spare and lithe. It’s very dry but flavorful and woodsy, infused with clean notes of loam, moss and forest floor, and the finish brings all elements together is a well-knit amalgam. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $45.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Michel Chapoutier’s venture from the Rhone Valley west to Roussillon produced the Domaine de Bila-Haut label. The basic reds are rustic, wholesome and tasty, while the upper-tier wines reveal more complexity and refinement. One of the latter, in the current vintage, is the Bila-Haut Occultum Lapidem 2013, Côtes du Roussillon Villages Latour de France. Occultum Lapidem means “hidden stone,” and the words occur in the Medieval Latin alchemical motto: Visita Interiora Terrae Rectificando Invenies Occultum Lapidem Veram Medicina, which translates to “Visit the interior of the earth and by purifying (what you find there) you will discover the hidden stone, which is the true medicine.” That’s a heady requirement for a wine to fulfill, but this one does so handily. The vines average 60 years old and are farmed biodynamically. The wines see no new oak or small barriques but ferment using natural yeasts in cement vats and age half in cement and half in 600-liter demi-muid barrels. This is a blend of 50 percent syrah, 40 percent grenache and 10 percent carignan.

Bila-Haut Occultum Lapidem 2013 offers a dark ruby color with a tinge of magenta. Every element — to be alchemical — you expect from this combination of grapes is present but both intensified and made elegant; the herbal-floral-woodsy qualities are here in notes of sage and rosemary, violets and lavender, sandalwood, allspice and underbrush; fruit falls into the plum, blackberry and blueberry range, with touches ripe and succulent as well as dried and spare, and punctuated by a hint of slightly raspy raspberry; a foundation of leather and loam rounds out the profile, along with hints of iodine, graphite, buoyant but not sharp acidity and mildly dense tannins. All of these factors are melded with a hand so deft that it amounts to artistry. 14 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018 to 2020. Excellent. About $30.

An R. Stack Selection, HB Wine Merchants, New York. This wine was a sample for review.

I was jesting a few days ago when I posted my “50 Great Wines of 2014″ and urged people to get their shopping lists ready. Obviously not many consumers are going to make note of a hundred-dollar cabernet sauvignon or a strictly limited, hard to find grenache gris. Here, though, is the roster that you’ve been waiting for, the “25 Great Wine Bargains of 2014,” a list of fairly widely available, well-made wines that will not but a strain on your budget. You will notice that a wine doesn’t have to be expensive to earn an Excellent rating. Seventeen of these products, priced from $10 to $20 have Excellent ratings; the rest are Very Good+. Not a one would you regret buying, some of them by the case. Now that fact that a number of these wines are from 2011 and 2012 means that they probably ought to be consumed quickly, especially the white wines and rosés; most of the reds can go for a year or two. The point is that these are terrific over-achieving wines that offer more personality and complexity than their prices might imply. The order is descending cost. Enjoy!

These wines were samples for review. This post is the seventh of 2015 on BTYH.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Robert Mondavi Fumé Blanc 2013, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $20.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Joseph Cattin “Brut Cattin” Crémant d’Alsace, France. Variable blend of pinot blanc, pinot gris, riesling and chardonnay. Excellent. About $19.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Nieto Senetier Nicanor Blend 2011, Mendoza, Argentina. 34 percent cabernet sauvignon, 33 percent malbec, 33 percent merlot. Excellent. About $19.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Bodegas Hidalgo La Gitana Manzanilla Sherry, nv, Sanlucar de Barrameda, Spain. Excellent. About $18.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

McCay Cellars Rosé 2013, Lodi. Old vine carignane with some grenache. Production was 253 cases. Excellent. About $18.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Wairau River Sauvignon Blanc 2013, Marlborough, New Zealand. Excellent. About $18.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Jean Ginglinger Cuvée George Pinot Blanc 2011, Alsace, France. Excellent. About $17.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Livon Pinot Grigio 2013, Collio, Italy. Excellent. About $17.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________

J Pinot Gris 2013, California. Excellent. About $16.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Prazo de Roriz 2010, Douro, Portugal. Tinta barroca 37%, “old vines” 18%, touriga nacional 16%, touriga franca 15%, tinta amarela 7%, tinta cao 7%. Excellent. About $16.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Alois Lageder Pinot Grigio 2012, Dolomiti, Italy. Excellent. About $15.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

CVNE Monopole 2013, Rioja Blanco, Spain. 100 percent viura grapes. Very Good+ verging on Excellent. About $15.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Fratelli Chianti 2011, Toscana, Italy. 100% sangiovese. Very Good+. About $15.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Domaine Les Aphillanthes Rosé 2013, Côtes du Rhône, France. Cinsault, grenache, counoise, mourvèdre. Excellent. About $14.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Mulderbosch Chenin Blanc 2011, Western Cape, South Africa. Excellent. About $14.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dry Creek Fumé Blanc 2013, Sonoma County. Very Good+. About $14.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Palacios de Bornos Verdejo 2013, Rueda, Spain. 100 percent verdejo grapes. Excellent. About $14.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Stemmari Dalila 2012, Bianco Terre Siciliane, Italy. 80 percent grillo grapes, 20 percent viognier, Excellent. About $14.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Wolfberger Pinot Blanc 2013, Alsace, France. Excellent. About $14.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Aia Vecchia Vermentino 2013, Toscana, Italy. With 5 percent viognier grapes. Very Good+. About $12.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Pedroncelli Signature Selection Dry Rosé of Zinfandel 2012, Dry Creek Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $12.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Li Veli Passamante 2012, Salice Salentino, Italy. 100% negroamaro grapes. Very Good+. About $12.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Trim Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, California. With 15 percent merlot, 3 percent malbec. Very Good+. About $11.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Mandolin Chardonnay 2012, Monterey County. Very Good+. About $10.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Tres Ojos Garnacha 2011, Calatayud, Spain. 85 percent grenache, 7 percent each cabernet sauvignon and tempranillo, 1 percent syrah. Very Good+. About $10.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Unbate your breath, My Readers, today I present the annual “50 Great Wines” entry, this edition for 2014. I posted to BiggerThanYourHead 135 times in 2014 and reviewed 582 wines. These 50 Great Wines represent 8.6 percent of the wines I reviewed last year. How do I choose the 50 wines for this honor? First, any wine that I rated Exceptional automatically gets a berth in the roster. After that, the selection process involves going back over every post, looking at the reviews of the wines that received an Excellent rating, reading the notes again and looking for the words or phrases signifying that I felt a wine was exciting, provocative, intriguing, highly individual. You can be sure that this list probably isn’t definitive; how could such a selection of wines be? I cut from the field many wines that could easily have been included, but the limit is 50 and they had to be sacrificed. Even as I clicked on the “Publish” button on WordPress I thought, “Oh no, how could I leave out ……?”

Going through these wines, many of My Readers may cry “Foul!” because some of them were produced in severely limited quantities, but that’s often the case with great wines. Think of the situation as a challenge wherein you face a sort of scavenger hunt in tracking such wines down. Some of these wines were made by well-known winemakers for prominent wineries or estates; others are far more obscure, but I enjoy bringing attention to young, small, family-owned and -operated properties that otherwise might not receive the exposure they deserve. The usual suspect grapes are included, of course — chardonnay and sauvignon blanc, cabernet sauvignon and pinot noir — but you will also find on this list proponents of trousseau gris and grenache gris, carignane and cinsault, crafted by brave pioneers of the unusual, even rare grapes. With one exception — the Dolce 2005 — these products are the current releases from their wineries, or close to it. I think all of them were samples for review or were tasted at the property. I hope this list of 50 Great Wines inspires you to look for the ones that capture your interest and to try wines you never encountered before. Prices, by the way, range from about $22 to $120. Coming in a few days will be my annual list of 25 Great Bargain Wines $20 and Under.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Amapola Creek Cabernet Sauvignon 2009, Sonoma Valley. With 7 percent petit verdot. 1,475 cases. Exceptional. About $70.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Anakota Helena Montana Vineyard Elevation 950 Feet Cabernet Sauvignon 2009, Knights Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $75.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Animo Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Napa Valley. With 17 percent petit verdot. From Michael Mondavi. Excellent. About $85.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

d’Arenberg The Other Side Shiraz 2010, McLaren Vale, Australia. 14% alc. 96-year-old vines. 200 six-pack cases. Exceptional. About $85.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

d’Arenberg Tyche’s Mustard Shiraz 2010, McLaren Vale, Australia. 14% alc. 200 six-pack cases. Exceptional. About $85.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Battenfeld Spanier Mölsheim Riesling 2012, Rheinhessen, Germany. Exceptional. About $23.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Blair Estate Pinot Noir 2010, Arroyo Seco, Monterey County. 481 cases. Excellent. About $35.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Bonny Doon Le Cigare Blanc 2013, Arroyo Seco, Monterey County. 55% roussanne, 26% grenache blanc, 19% picpoul. 1,965 cases. Exceptional. About $28.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Bonny Doon Cuvée R Grenache 2012, Monterey County. 593 cases. Excellent. About $48.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Cade Sauvignon Blanc 2013, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $28.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Catena Zapata White Bones Chardonnay 2010, Mendoza, Argentina. Exceptional. About $120.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Cenyth 2009, Sonoma County. 14.5% alc. 47% cabernet sauvignon, 28% merlot, 10% cabernet franc, 8% petit verdot, 7% malbec. The debut release from this collaboration between Julia Jackson, daughter of the late Jess Jackson and his wife Barbara Banke, and Helene Seillan, daughter of Pierre Seillan, winemaker of Verité. Exceptional. About $60.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Chêne Bleu Aliot 2010, Vin de Pays du Vaucluse, France. 65 percent roussanne, 30 percent grenache blanc, 5 percent marsanne and some smidgeon of viognier. Exceptional. About $85.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Clos Saron Out of the Blue, 2013, Sierra Foothills. 90 percent cinsault, 5 percent syrah, 5 percent graciano. (The cinsault vines planted in 1885.) 170 cases. Excellent. About $30.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Cornerstone Cellars Howell Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Napa Valley. 14.7% alc. With 10% merlot. 470 cases. Exceptional. About $80.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Cornerstone Cellars Sauvignon Blanc 2011, Napa Valley. 361 cases. Exceptional. About $30.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dolce 2005, Napa Valley. 90 percent semillon, 10 percent sauvignon blanc. A majestic dessert wine. Exceptional. About $85 for a half-bottle.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Elena Walch Kastelaz Gewürztraminer 2012, Alto Adige, Italy. Exceptional. About $32.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Eyrie Vineyards Original Vines Reserve Pinot Gris 2012, Dundee Hills, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 261 cases. Exceptional. About $33.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

FEL Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County. Excellent. About $38.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Fields Family Wines Old Vine Zinfandel 2011, Mokelumne River, Lodi. 200 cases. Excellent. About $24.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Gallegos Boekenoogen Vineyard Pinot Noir 2012, Santa Lucia Highlands, Monterey County. 250 cases. Excellent. About $42.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Grgich Hills Estate Fume Blanc 2012, Napa Valley. Exceptional. About $30.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Idlewild Grenache Gris 2013, Mendocino County. 230 cases. Excellent. About $22.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Inama Vigneto du Lot 2011, Soave Classico, Italy. Excellent. About $30.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Inman Family “Endless Crush” Rosé of Pinot Noir 2013, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. Exceptional. About $25.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Inwood Estates Vineyards Chardonnay 2012, Dallas County, Texas. Excellent. About $40.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

J. Christopher Wines Lumière Pinot Noir 2011, Eola-Amity Hills, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 756 cases. Excellent. About $35.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

J. Davies Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Diamond Mountain District, Napa Valley. With nine percent malbec. Exceptional. About $90.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Tenutae Lageder Porer Pinot Grigio 2012, Sudtirol, Alto adige, Italy. Excellent. About $25.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

McCay Cellars Carignane 2011, Lodi, 218 cases. Excellent. About $32.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Newton “The Puzzle” 2010, Spring Mountain District, Napa Valley. This proprietary wine is a blend of 60 percent cabernet sauvignon grapes, 18 percent each cabernet franc and petit verdot and 4 percent malbec. Exceptional. About $100.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Paul Hobbs Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Napa Valley. With 3 percent petit verdot, 1 percent each malbec and cabernet franc. Excellent. About $100.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Pfendler Pinot Noir 2012, Sonoma Coast. 14.4% alc. 230 cases. Exceptional. About $45.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Phifer Pavitt Date Night Sauvignon Blanc 2013, Napa Valley. 14.5% alc. 588 cases. Exceptional. About $30.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

La Pitchoune Pinot Noir 2012, Sonoma Coast. 279 cases. Exceptional. About $60.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Pittnauer Rosenberg St. Laurent 2010, Burgenland, Austria. Excellent. About $27.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Quinta do Vallado 20 Years Old Tawny Porto. 83 cases. Exceptional. About $80 for a 500-milliliter bottle..
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Respite Reichel Vineyard Indulgence 2010, Alexander valley, Sonoma County. A proprietary blend of 65 percent cabernet sauvignon, 22 percent malbec and 13 percent cabernet franc. 77 cases. Exceptional. About $75.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

La Rochelle Dutton Ranch Pinot Noir 2010. Russian River Valley. 14.2% alc. 429 six-pack cases. Exceptional. About $48.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Smith-Madrone Cabernet Sauvignon 2009, Spring Mountain District, Napa Valley. 1,302 cases. Excellent. About $45.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Steven Kent Winery Merrellie Chardonnay 2012, Livermore Valley. 504 cases. Excellent. About $34.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Three Sticks Durell Vineyard Origin Chardonnay 2012, Sonoma Valley. 266 cases. Exceptional. About $48.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Three Sticks Durell Vineyard Pinot Noir 2011, Sonoma Coast. 170 cases. Exceptional. About $65.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Tin Barn Coryelle Fields Syrah 2009, Sonoma Coast. 123 cases. Excellent. About $25.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Two Shepherds Trousseau Gris 2012, Fanucchi Vineyard, Russian River Valley. 25 cases. Exceptional. About $25.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

VML Blanc de Noirs 2010, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $50.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Volta Cabernet Sauvignon 2009, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $60.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Wakefield St. Andrews Single Vineyard Release Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Clare Valley, Australia. 250 cases imported. Excellent. About $60.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Weltner Rödelseer Küchenmeister Trocken Sylvaner 2012, Franken, Germany. Excellent. About $27.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Chêne Bleu — “blue oak” — occupies 340 acres in a unique microclimate at elevations from 1,600 to 1,800 feet in a saddle of the Dentelles de Montmirail where four southern Rhône appellations — Gigondas, Côtes du Ventoux, Côtes du Rhône and Séguret — merge. Eighty-seven acres of the estate, called La Verrière for more than six centuries, are cultivated to vineyards; grapes have been grown in the steep, stony area for a thousand years. Xavier and Nicole Rolet purchased the isolated and long neglected property and its ancient ruined priory in 1993 and spent 10 years restoring the dilapidated buildings and shabby vineyards. The first wines were released in 2006. Viticulturalist is Xavier Rolet’s sister Bénédicte Gallucci; winemaker is her husband Jean-Louis Gallucci. The vineyards are managed in a combination of organic and biodynamic methods. The use of new oak barrels is sparing.

The winery eschews the typical appellation system, preferring to use the simpler Vin de Pays du Vaucluse designation or, as that category became a few years ago when the Vin de Pays AOC was dismantled, Vaucluse Indication Geographique Protegée, a step that allows a certain freedom in the choice of grapes they blend. Everything about this stylish, sophisticated winery and its products — and prices — indicates a desire to be considered a world-class estate, and I would not be surprised if such is not the case within the next 10 to 20 years. Greatness is not achievable in winemaking within a vintage or two; it takes time for knowledge and experience to merge perfectly with nature and terroir, though the wines under review today seem well on their way. All five — a rose from 2013, whites from 2012 and 2010 and two reds from 2007, the current releases — display remarkable individuality, personality and character.

Imported by Wilson Daniels, St. Helena, Calif. These wines were samples for review.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
The Chêne Bleu Rose 2013, Ventoux, is a blend of 65 percent grenache, 30 percent syrah and 5 percent cinsault, given a very cold fermentation in stainless steel for five weeks. Twenty percent of the wine aged for three months in a combination of old and new French oak barrels, mainly barrique-size, that is 228-liters or 60 gallons. As I mentioned on Facebook, if this isn’t the best rose wine I tasted this year, I can’t think immediately of what the better one is. The color is a classic pale onion skin hue; the whole impression is of a delicate, even ethereal construct that nonetheless retains a slightly earthy, loamy, smoky aspect. Aromas of dried strawberries and raspberries are wreathed with notes of tangerine, lime peel and green tea, elements that segue generously into the mouth, where they take on touches of damp and dusty limestone and flint, all energized by brisk acidity. Most memorable is the wine’s sense of tone and presence, its suave and elegance weight on the palate. 13 percent alcohol. 800 six-pack cases were imported. Drink through the end of 2015. Excellent. About $31.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
The Chêne Bleu Aliot 2010, Vin de Pays du Vaucluse, is named for Aliot de Montvin, an artisan glassblower of noble birth who named the winery’s estate La Verrière — The Glassblowing Workshop — in 1427. The blend is 65 percent roussanne, 30 percent grenache blanc, 5 percent marsanne and some smidgeon of viognier. Cold fermentation occurred in 600-liter demi-muids — 159-gallon barrels — and the wine aged six to eight months in a combination of old and new French oak. The color is bright yellow-gold; the wine is rich and honeyed in every sense, with scents and flavors of spiced pears and peaches, candied quince and ginger and hints of papaya and mango. Rich and honeyed, yes, but both succulent and bone-dry, vibrant, crystalline, wreathed with notes of cloves and sea-salt, savory spiced and baked pineapple and grapefruit, with a contrasting touch, on the lush finish, of grapefruit bitterness, the entire package permeated by limestone and chalk minerality. 14 percent alcohol. 45 six-pack cases were imported. That’s right readers, 270 bottles for the USA, and we took one to dinner at Erling Jensen restaurant in Memphis, where the wine performed beautifully with an appetizer of crisp sweetbreads with parmesan ravioli, shiitake mushrooms and a veal jus. Drink — carefully stored — through 2018 to 2020. Exceptional. About $85.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Not quite 100 percent varietal, the Chêne Bleu Viognier 2012, contains 4 percent grenache blanc. The appellation is IGP — Indication Geographique Protegée — Vaucluse, IGP having replaced the old, familiar Vin de Pays. As with the Aliot, mentioned above, this wine was cold-fermented in 600-liter demi-muids and aged six to eight months in a combination of old and new French oak. The color is pale gold; the (to my mind) signature elements of the viognier grape quickly emerge with notes of jasmine and gardenia, cloves and mango, bee’s-wax, baked pear and dried thyme. The wine is distinctly savory, its ripe stone-fruit flavors rife with sage, sea-salt and grapefruit rind; back-notes of dried apricot, ginger and quince lend complexity to lip-smacking acidity, scintillating limestone minerality and a dense, almost chewy texture. There’s nothing heavy or opulent here though; all elements are delicately tied and buoyantly expressed. 13.5 percent alcohol. 300 cases were produced. Drink now through 2018 to 2020. Excellent. About $41.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
The blend of the Chêne Bleu Abelard 2007, Vin de Pays du Vaucluse, is 90 percent grenache to 10 percent syrah, the grapes derived from vines that are 45 and more years old. The initial winemaking process involved a three-day cold maceration in wooden vats, 10 days of fermentation and then four weeks of maceration on the skins; The wine spent 11 months in a combination of old and new French oak barrels, primarily 60-gallon barriques; it is unfined and unfiltered. My advice is to decant the wine — not a difficult or scary process, just pour it into a clean glass container — and let it air out for an hour or two before drinking. The color is dark ruby; remarkably fresh for a seven-year-old grenache, this offers scents of ripe and slightly roasted blackberries and plums laden with dusty graphite minerality and notes of fruitcake, old leather, lavender and dried rosemary. Lithe and supple in texture, Abelard 2007, unlike its namesake, does not lack balls; the tannic-acid structure is forthright and more evident as time passes and you pay attention to what’s happening in the glass and bottle, but that rather stern foundation does not submerge the wine’s innate balance, integration and elegance. 14.5 percent alcohol. 800 six-pack cases were imported. Drink through 2020 to 2025. Excellent. About $100.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
The Chêne Bleu Heloise 2007, Vin de Pays du Vaucluse, is the most complicated and intriguing of this group of wines. The winemaking regimen is the same as for its Abelard 2007 stablemate, if it’s permissible to use such a term for these celebrated lovers — or non-lovers — though this is a blend of 60 percent syrah, 37 percent grenache and 3 percent viognier. The color is dark ruby, and at first this Heloise feels more mature than the companion Abelard — sorry, my dear! — more autumnal in its scents of smoky, spiced and macerated red and black cherries and currants and undertones of loam, mushrooms and moss. Give the wine a chance, however, to build its character, either in the glass or by decanting an hour or so before consuming; let it expand with elements of fennel and pomegranate, dried rosemary and cedar and their requisite resiny notes (meaning that in the best way); allow it to gain in suppleness and the savory qualities of sage and sea-salt and depth of spicy red and black fruit flavors. And while its feet are definitely planted in the earth, Heloise 07 succeeds in maintaining an elevating, wild note at the top of its range. 15 percent alcohol. 800 six-pack cases were imported. Drink now through 2018 to 2022. Excellent. About $100.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Here’s a terrific and reasonably-priced wine to open when you’re serving such redolent and deeply-flavored wintery fare as braised short ribs, veal or lamb shanks or hearty stews. The Vina Robles Red 4 2012, from Paso Robles, in San Luis Obispo County, is an interesting blend of 50 percent petite sirah grapes with 20 percent each syrah and grenache and 10 percent mourvèdre, drawn primarily from the winery’s estate Huerhuero vineyard. In other words, it’s a California rendition of a southern Rhône Valley red wine except that half of it consists of petite sirah, a grape grown almost exclusively in the Golden State. The wine aged 16 months in a combination of small and large American, French and European oak barrels, the latter term — I mean France is in Europe, n’est-ce pas? — usually implying an origin in what used to be called Eastern Europe, i.e., Slovenia or Hungary. In any case, the color here is dark ruby with a magenta-mulberry cast; the bouquet is spicy, feral, bursting with notes of ripe blackberries, blueberries and currants. The wine is lithe and supple on the palate, buoyed by vibrant acidity and mild but slightly dusty tannins and a line of graphite minerality, all at the service of tasty black and blue fruit flavors permeated by hints of lavender, leather and bitter chocolate and briery-brambly undertones. There’s a lot of personality here for the price. 13.9 percent alcohol. Vina Robles was founded in 1996 by Swiss entrepreneur Hans Nef; winemaker is Kevin Willenborg. Drink now through 2016 or ’17. Very Good+. About $17.

A sample for review.

We can’t drink great wine all the time. Contrary to what My Readers may think, I certainly don’t. In fact, a diet of perfection would become cloying and wearisome, n’est-ce pas? Well, perhaps not, but let’s assume that most people really just want a decent bottle of wine to accompany a simple meal. Here, then, are two white wines and four reds designed to be to consumed with, say, a tuna sandwich or seafood risotto, on the one hand, or a burger or steak, on the other. Prices range from $12 to $17, with quality fairly evenly portioned along the Very Good to Very Good+ range. Will these wines — especially the reds — lodge in the memory as some of the best wine you’ve tasted? certainly not, but they get the job done, or better, at a reasonable price. If only everything in life turned out that way. Quick reviews here, intended to pique your interest and whet the palate. Enjoy!

These wines were samples for review.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Stepping Stone Rocks! White Wine 2013, North Coast, California. 13.3% alc. (Stepping Stone is the second label of Cornerstone Cellars; Rocks! is, well, the second label of Stepping Stone.) “Mystery” blend of chardonnay, viognier and muscat canelli. Very pale gold color; lilac, lemon-lime and pear, slightly grassy and herbal, hint of lemongrass; quite clean, crisp, fresh and dry, with a kind of gin-like purity and snap; taut, vibrant, lean but a pleasing, cloud-like texture; crystalline acidity and scintillating limestone minerality; slightly earthy finish. Extremely attractive white blend for short-term drinking. Very Good+. About $15, representing Excellent Value.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Tomero Torrontes 2013, Mendoza, Argentina. 13.5% alc. Pale gold color; jasmine and gardenia, spiced pear and lemon balm, lime peel and a touch of grapefruit, a few minutes in the glass bring in whiffs of lavender and lilac, though this is not overwhelmingly floral, all is subtle and nuanced; pert citrus and stone fruit flavors; lovely body, crisp, lithe and lively yet imbued with an almost talc-like texture that slides across the palate like silk; hint of grapefruit bitterness on the finish. A superior torrontes for consuming over the next year. Very Good+. About $17.
Imported by Blends, Plymouth, Calif.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Mandolin Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Central Coast. 13.8% alc. Brilliant dark ruby with a flush of mulberry at the rim; unfolds layers of cedar,
thyme and black olive, black currants and plums, hint of wild berry; notes of iodine and graphite; trace of wood in the slightly leathery tannins, quite dry but juicy with herb-inflected black fruit flavors; sleek and supple texture, lively acidity; spice-and-mineral-packed finish. Now through the end of 2015. Great personality for the price. Very Good+. About $12, an Amazing Bargain.
Image from brainwines.com.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Esprit du Rhône 2013, Côtes du Rhône, France. 13.5% alc. 60% grenache, 30% syrah, 5% carignan, 5% cinsault. 1,000 cases imported. Medium-dark ruby color shading to a transparent rim; aromas of ripe blackberries, blueberries and plum with notes of cloves, briers and leather; fairly dense and robust tannins and bright acidity keep the texture forthright and lively for the sake of tasty, spicy black fruit flavors. Now through 2016. Very Good. About $12.
Imported by Quintessential, Napa, Calif. Image from vivino.com.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Nieto Senetiner Malbec 2012, Mendoza, Argentina. 14% alc. Dark ruby-purple; briery and brambly blackberry and plum fruit deeply imbued with cloves, mocha and licorice; moderate and slightly chewy tannins for structure, an uplift of acidity; tasty black fruit flavors in a rustic, graphite-laden package. Now into 2015. Very Good. About $13.
Imported by Foley Family Wines, Sonoma, Calif.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Tercos Bonarda 2013, Mendoza, Argentina. (From the winery of Ricardo Santos). 13.8% alc. Dark ruby hue, almost opaque; spicy and feral, blackberries and plums with notes of wild cherry, tar, graphite and licorice; heaps of rough-hewn tannins make for a sturdy mouthful of wine, though nothing heavy or ponderous to detract from ripe, delicious blackberry and blueberry flavors; loads of personality. Now through the end of 2015. Very Good. About $14.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Next Page »