France


This post looks at the Champagne and sparkling wine we drank half a bottle each of on New Year’s Eve — and finished today. The Loimer Extra Brut nv from Austria we sipped while watching the news last night; the Egly-Ouriet Brut Tradition Grand Cru nv we drank with Royal Ossetra caviar after midnight and the turn of the year. Both products were samples for review, as I am required to inform My Readers by ruling of the Federal Trade Commission.
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loimer-x-brut
The Loimer Extra Brut, made by Fred Loimer in the Austrian region of Niederösterreich, is an unusual blend (to me) of 42 percent grüner
veltliner grapes, 33 percent zweigelt and 25 percent pinot noir, grown in vineyards farmed on biodynamic principles; it aged 12 months in bottle on the lees. This sparkling wine was, frankly, a revelation of bright, clean, crisp attractiveness married to an interesting fruit profile and a chiseled limestone structure. The color is very pale gold, enlivened by a swirling upward surge of tiny bubbles; scents of apple and pear compote, ripe and spicy, are wreathed with notes of peach, heather and camellia. It’s cool, clean, crisp and steely on the palate, and its scintillating acidity leads to a vibrant crystalline finish. 12 percent alcohol. Not merely charming, but exhibiting lovely, transparent, significant weight and presence. Excellent. About $30.
Imported by Winebow Inc., New York.
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Champagne Egly-Ouriet is a grower house that rests in the top echelon of estates that farm and harvest their own grapes and turn them into egly_traditionChampagne. The Egly-Ouriet Brut Tradition Grand Cru nv derives completely from the highest rated vineyards on the grading system used in the region. It’s a blend of 70 percent pinot noir and 30 percent chardonnay, aged four years on the lees. The current release was disgorged in July 2016, so it’s about as fresh as a Champagne gets. The color is pure Jean Harlow, that is, platinum blond; the bubbles erupt in a tempest-like froth. The overall effect is of something elegant, elevated and austere, finely-knit and integrated; hints of roasted lemon and spiced pear open to faint but persistent notes of lilac, lemongrass and green tea; this Champagne is soft and reticent on the toasty brioche quality, focusing on crispness, a permeation of limestone-flint minerality and bracing seashell salinity, all at the mercy of an encompassing vibrant, resonant character. 12.5 percent alcohol. This should drink beautifully, becoming more honed and burnished, through 2020 to ’22. Winemaker was Francis Egly. Excellent. About $68, but found on the internet from $50 to $80.
Imported by North Berkeley Wines, Berkeley, Calif.
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So, My Readers, it’s New Year’s Eve, and we’re on the cusp on entering the Unknown. Let’s celebrate then with three bottles of different styled Champagnes, all guaranteed to offer great pleasure and satisfaction. Remember, as you stand in some house or apartment or bar, singing that dreary “Auld Lang Syng” with a bunch of drunken strangers you actually care nothing about that this is a pivotal and symbolic moment and that you’re having fun. Whee! Also remember that if you’re opening a bottle of any kind of sparkling wine that however fraudulently festive it may seem to pop one of those corks with a tremendous explosion and frothing of bubbly foam everywhere, that the cork comes rushing from the neck of the bottle at about 60 miles per hour and that it can do real damage to objects, animals and the human eye. Let’s use caution, moderation, forethought and get home alive to enjoy another year.

Happy New Year, friends, be well, be content and do the work you were intended to do.
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The J. Lassalle Preference Premier Cru Brut is predominantly pinot meunier, with 20 percent each chardonnay and pinot lassalle_preference_nonvintage13_webnoir, from vines averaging 50 years old; the vintages in the current disgorgement are 2009 and 2010. It aged 48 months in bottle on the lees. The color is pale gold; the bubbles are tiny, energetic, flourishing. This Champagne is as crisp as a cat’s whisker and as chiseled and faceted as a geode; it’s all smoke and steel, roasted lemon and spiced pear, limestone and flint, enclosed in a bright, brisk and brilliant structure that scintillates with dynamic acidity and an undertow of clean earthiness. 12 percent alcohol. Always a favorite in our house. Excellent. About $45 to $50.
Imported by Kermit Lynch Wine Merchants, Berkeley, Calif.
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breton-roseThe Breton Fils Brut Rose is an unusual blend of 40 percent chardonnay, 42 percent pinot meunier and 18 percent vin des Coteaux Champenois, that is, still wine that is also allowed to be produced in an AOC contiguous with Champagne itself and using the same permitted grapes. It aged three years in the bottle. The color is a wholly entrancing and intense copper-salmon hue; notes of blood orange and tangerine rind are permeated by hints of macerated and slightly bruised raspberries and candied citrus, displaying just a hint of dried herbs, all of this animated by the liveliest of tiny frothing bubbles and, extending to the palate, a striking arrow of clean acidity and an edge of limestone that burgeons from mid-palate back through the spare, austere finish. 12.5 percent alcohol. Excellent. I paid $60 locally, but prices around the country seem to start at about $48.
Imported Heritage LLC, Corona, Calif.
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The Charles Heidsieck Brut Reserve is a blend of 40 percent pinot noir, 40 percent chardonnay and 20 percent pinot meunier aged ch_brut_reserve_front-largethree years in the bottle on the lees. The blend contains about 40 percent reserve wines, up to 10 years old. The color is a brilliant medium gold hue, shimmering with a torrent of tiny bubbles; seamlessly layered notes of heather, honey and Granny Smith apples, fresh-baked brioche and hints of toffee and almond skin are twined with seashell and salt marsh, hay and baked pears. This is formidably dry yet rich and elegant, its stone-fruit and citrus notions buoyed by a stream of bright acidity and a coastal shelf of limestone minerality; its sense of heft and presence on the palate is fleet-footed, long-lasting and ultimately delicate without being attenuated. 12 percent alcohol. Beautifully-made and a great pleasure to drink. Excellent. About $65.
Imported by Folio Fine Wine Partners, Napa Calif. A sample for review.
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canard
The Champagne house of Canard-Duchêne was founded in 1868 by Victor Canard and Léonie Duchêne, and thus does not mean “duck of oak” as some people apparently believe. Since 2003, it has been owned by the Thienot Group, which includes the house of Joseph Perrier. The Champagne Canard-Duchêne Authentic Brut nv is a blend of 45% pinot noir, 35% pinot meunier and 20% chardonnay, with 20 percent reserve wines, that is, from older vintages, in the mix. The color is pale but bright gold; a persistent stream of tiny bubbles surges upward. This is all smoke and steel, pear and quince, with notes of grapefruit and roasted lemon, lightly toasted brioche and lemongrass. On the palate, this Champagne is dry, crisp and lively, energetic and engaging, displaying a pleasing balance of moderately lush texture and chiming acidity against a background of a scintillating limestone-flint element and seashell salinity; hints of heather and hay and slightly honeyed peach fill in the edges. 12 percent alcohol. No tremendous depth and profundity but plenty of charm, elegance and finely-wrought pleasure. A favorite in our house. Excellent. About $40 but seen online as low as $30.

Imported by Thienot USA, San Rafael, Calif. A sample for review.

Do you think they sell Nerthe Balls in the gift shop at Chateau La Nerthe? Hahaha, no, of course not! I was kidding! Wineries and estates in Europe, especially those that trace their history back to 1560, as La Nerthe does, see no need to follow the California model of wineries offering tasting rooms and gift shops, picnic grounds and play grounds, jazz concerts and movie series. Not that no estates in France, Italy, Germany and so on indulge in these consumer-oriented activities, but there’s a sense that the business at hand is growing the best grapes and turning them into the best wines, no need to hire a staff visitor-resources coordinator. You could spend days in Burgundy or the Rhone Valley and not see a corkscrew for sale at a winery.

Anyway, Chateau La Nerthe occupies 225 acres, certified organic since 1998, in the southern Rhone region of Chateauneuf-du-nerthe-09-1280x600Pape, named for a summer palace that Pope John XXII, one of the alternative popes, built north of Avignon in the 14th Century (not pictured here). It was somewhat like the “Heather has two mommies” situation, except that in 14th Century Europe Heather had two Papas. Wine has been produced in the southern Rhone Valley since times immemorial, or at least since the wine-swilling Romans established vineyards, but Chateauneuf-du-Pape as we know it was only codified in 1923 by Baron Le Roy of Chateau Fortia (and amended in 1936), thus setting into motion the momentum toward the organization of the French A.O.C. system. Chateauneuf-du-Pape is unique for the number of grape varieties allowed into its blended red and white wines, 13 types originally but increased to 18 in 2009 by counting black, pink and white variations of the same grapes separately. The percentage of grapes in each wine is not regulated, and red and white wines may utilize both red and white grapes, though the number of estates that cross-color grapes in now very few. Sticking to the primary (and slightly or severely diminished) varieties the red grapes are grenache — the primary grape in these vineyards — syrah, mourvedre, cinsault, counoise and the little encountered muscardin, vaccarese, picpoul and terret noir; the whites are grenache blanc, roussanne, clairette, bourboulenc and picardin.

Vines at La Nerthe average 40 years old. The vineyard surrounds the winery and mansion (pictured above) and features the classic Chateauneuf-du-Pape characteristic of large, round stones — galets — on the surface. Winemaker is Christian Voeux.

Pasternak Wine Imports, Harrison, N.Y. These wines were samples for review.
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Chateau La Nerthe 2012, Chateauneuf-du-Pape, is a blend of 48 percent grenache, 29 percent syrah, 22 mourvedre and a scant 1 percent nerthecinsault; no white grapes for this one. The wine aged 12 months in a combination of 63 percent barriques and 37 percent large wooden casks and vats. The color is dark ruby with a lighter, transparent rim; this is rich and ripe, pungent with scents of black cherries and currants with hints of wild berries, cloves and allspice and, after a few minutes in the glass, strains of graphite, smoke, black pepper and damp ashes. At first, the wine is quite mellow and palatable, but it builds power and structure, as the fruit flavors add macerated red berries to the black fruit and dusty, velvety tannins assert themselves; the finish feels rather chiseled and honed from the stones of the vineyard. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2020 to 2024. Excellent. About $65.
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Chateau La Nerthe 2014, Chateaunuef-du-Pape blanc, is a blend of 40 percent each grenache blanc and roussanne, 10 percent each clairette nerthe-2and bourboulenc. The wine aged in a combination of 228-liter oak foudres and 62 percent stainless steel tanks. The color is mild, medium gold; classic aromas of bee’s-wax and lanolin, yellow plums and peaches, heather, hay and camellia wreathe themselves into a beguiling bouquet; the wine is quite dry, offering plenty of body and stuffing in the way of bright acidity and scintillating limestone minerality, as well as yellow fruit flavors tinged with quince preserves and crystallized ginger, yet it demonstrates a sort of Southern languor and allure, a kind of low-cut gown and tanned shoulders effect that makes it irresistible. The finish, however, is notably spare, brisk and saline, bracing with limestone minerality and grapefruit pith. 13 percent alcohol. Now through 2019 to ’21. Excellent. About $65.
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Beaujolais, like all of Gaul, is divided into three parts, or perhaps the better word would be categories. The basic level is just “Beaujolais,” widely available, the darling of the bistro carafe, and made from grapes grown on the flatter areas in the western part of the region. (This is south of Burgundy, abutting the Côte Mâconnais.) Straight Beaujolais should be simple, grapy and agreeable. Next higher on the scale and presumably better quality is the category of Beaujolais-Villages, made from vineyards in the hills to the north. Best are the Cru Beaujolais, derived from 10 communes that occupy privileged locations in these northern hills. The red grape here is the Gamay Noir à Jus Blanc; a minuscule amount of Beaujolais Blanc is made from chardonnay grapes. Also, of course, there is Beaujolais Nouveau, the fresh, just-after-harvest quaffer of which altogether too much is made every November. The Cru commune wines are Brouilly, Chénas, Chiroubles, Côte de Brouilly, Fleurie, Juliénas, Morgon, Moulin-à-Vent, Regnié and Saint-Amour. The name on the label will be the name of the commune; the term “Beaujolais” frequently is not mentioned. Today, we look at two examples from Côte de Brouilly and Juliénas, each representing Good Value.

Imported by Kermit Lynch Wine Merchants, Berkeley, Calif. Samples for review.
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The grapes for the Domaine Chignard “Beauvernay” Juliénas 2014 were grown in vineyards 60 years old and more. The estate was founded in julienas_12_web 1900 and produces only 3,000 cases annually. The wine aged 13 months in old foudres, that is to say, large barrels of various dimensions. The color is light transparent ruby; on the nose, a glorious melange of strawberries and mint, iodine and loam, smoke, briers and brambles weaves a spell, unfolding, as the moments pass, notes of red licorice and a distillation of rose petals. Yeah, it’s pretty damned heady stuff, but with undertones of darkness, the rasp of raspberry leaf, the tug of graphite on the palate and brisk acidity, yet, withal, a model of elegance and delicacy. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2019 to ’21. Excellent. About $22.
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Established in 1877, this domaine harvests grapes from vineyards that average 50 years in age and are situated on slopes of 48 degrees; thivin_cotedebrouilly_novintage10_12dot5alc_web
people, that’s steep. The Chateau Thivin Côte de Brouilly 2014 aged six months in old foudres. A medium ruby hue fades to a lighter, almost transparent rim; the wine features a fresh cherry-berry nose that deepens with aspects of iodine, loam and dried thyme, raspberries and black cherries. On the palate, the wine displays appealing silky heft and substance; it’s lively and dynamic, imbued with earthy, rooty notes of leather and oolong tea and bringing in shadings of woody spices, heather, forest flowers and blueberries. 13 percent alcohol. A lovely Cru Beaujolais that shyly offers a serious side. Drink now through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $22.
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As we head into the biggest sparkling wine season of the year, I’ll remind My Readers from time to time about Champagnes and other albrechtsparkling products worthy of consideration. An annual treat for us is the Cremant d’Alsace Brut Rose from the venerable estate of Lucien Albrecht, established in 1425, among the oldest family-owned wineries in Europe and still in the hands of the founding family. This non-vintage — i.e., multi-vintage — sparkling wine is made from 100 percent pinot noir grapes in the Champagne method of second fermentation in the bottle; this one spends 14 to 16 months in the bottle on the lees before being disgorged and resealed. The color is a lovely ruddy copper-salmon hue, highlighted by a surging fountain of tiny glittering bubbles; aromas of fresh raspberries and lime peel, blood orange and orange blossom are infused by notes of heather, spiced tea and limestone. Bright, brisk acidity lends this an almost tart character, though it flows on the palate with a full, round quality; the whole effect is delicate, elegant and steely, concluding in a slightly austere, saline, mineral-laced finish. Pure delight, with real style and a racy nature. 12 percent alcohol. Winemaker was Jerome Keller. Excellent. About $22, representing Good Value.

Pasternak Imports, Harrison, N.Y. A sample for review.

Let’s relax and think about the inevitable: Thanksgiving leftovers. We had eight people at our table last night but prepared enough food for at least 20. Not surprisingly, the refrigerator is crammed with plastic vessels containing an immense amount of leftover selections, though, curiously, not much pie. People tend to eat pie even when they’re aching with surfeit. All over the country, on Thanksgiving, Americans are saying, “Wow, I couldn’t eat another bite! Oh, well, sure, I guess I could manage some of that pecan pie.” Anyway, whether you’re making a hugelsandwich of turkey, dressing and cranberry sauce or just settling down to a plateful of food that bears a remarkable resemblance to what you ate yesterday, here’s a wine that makes a terrific accompaniment. The Famille Hugel Classic Riesling 2015, Alsace, from the winemaking family that goes back 13 generations in the region, was fashioned all in stainless steel to ensure its sense of freshness and immediate appeal. The color is pale gold with a faint green tone; enticing aromas of green apple and ripe peaches are wreathed with scents of lychee, jasmine and honeysuckle and a prominent element of petrol, or you could call it rubber eraser, in either case a typical note and always intriguing touch from the riesling grape. The wine is silky smooth but slightly chiseled on the palate, encompassing ripe and spicy and juicy stone-fruit flavors enlivened by fleet and lithe acidity and scintillating limestone minerality. The finish is clean, bright, spicy and floral and nicely faceted. A classic, all right, and a real crowd-pleaser. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018. Excellent. About $25.

Imported by Frederick Wildman & Sons, New York. A sample for review.

You won’t believe the price on today’s selection, and I mean that in the best way. I have been alsaceenjoying Alsace single-vineyard Grand Cru rieslings lately, and this example is one of the best. The Frédéric Mallo Vieilles Vignes Riesling Rosacker 2010, Alsace Grand Cru, offers a color of entrancing medium gold and arresting aromas of ripe peaches, mangoes and pears shot through with honeysuckle and the grape’s signature petrol element, all wrapped around notes of almond blossom and almond skin, cloves and dusty heather. Yep, it’s pretty damned heady stuff, all right. The entry is sweet and ripe, almost lush in its spiced peach and melon fanfare, but it slides across the palate going increasingly dry until reaching a finish of bright scintillating acidity and pure limestone and flint minerality. In fact, the wine displays quite a bit of tension in the poised equilibrium between sweetness and dryness, a tautness that provides energy and dynamism. From mid-palate back, it becomes more savory and saline, more chiseled and lithe. 13 percent alcohol. “Vieilles vignes,” in this case, means vines that are more than 50 years old. Drink through 2020 to ’24 with mildly spicy Asian fare or with a roasted pork tenderloin festooned with leeks and prunes or a roasted chicken stuffed with lemon and rosemary. Excellent. About $23, a Remarkable Value.

USA Wine Imports, New York. A sample for review.

As far as white wines are concerned, Spring and Summer tend to be the domains of bright, light, delicate wines that go down easy as aperitifs while we’re sitting out on the porch or patio or lounging in a bosky dell on a frolicsome picnic. Nothing wrong with those scenarios at all. Now that the weather is in transition, however, when there’s a touch of chilly, rainy uncertainty in the air and our thoughts are sliding toward more substantial fare than cucumber and watercress sandwiches — no crusts, please! — the logical choice would be white wines with a bit more heft, flavor and savor. The 10 examples under review today provide those qualities in diverse ways, because they are, naturally, diverse wines. Grapes include sauvignon blanc, riesling, roussanne and marsanne, vermentino, verdicchio and trebbiano. Some of the wines saw no oak while others received extended barrel aging. Their points of origin range from various spots in Italy and several regions in California, from Alsace in France to Pfalz in Germany. Above all, and I cannot emphasize this note too strenuously, every one of these wines was a joy to drink, first because they are so different each to each, and second because in their eloquent variations they reflect integrity of intentions in the vineyard and the winery, an integrity dedicated to the expressiveness of a location and grape varieties. Each wine mentioned here made me feel as if I were sipping liquid gold.
Unless otherwise noted, these wines were samples for review.
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The pale gold Arrow&Branch Sauvignon Blanc 2015, Napa Valley, performs that gratifying task of balancing the utmost in a delicate, elegant character with a vivacious, appealing personality. Aromas of pea shoot, heather, cucumber and lime peel are infused with damp limestone and flint, roasted lemon and lemon balm and a hint of raspberry leaf. The wine is bright and crisp, dense but paradoxically ethereal, and it opens to touches of almond skin and pear skin, waxy white flowers and a hint of the wildly exotic and tropical. All of these exuberant elements are handily restrained by brisk acidity and the mild spicy/woodsy aura of a touch of French oak. 14.1 percent alcohol. A truly beautiful sauvignon blanc, made by Jennifer Williams, for consuming through 2018 or ’19. Exceptional. About $35.
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The color of the Domaine Barmès-Buecher “Hengst” Riesling Grand Cru 2012, Alsace, is a slightly brassy medium gold hue of intense purity; the bouquet unfurls multiple layers of nuance as Platonic ripeness invests aromas of peach and quince touched with hints of lychee, musk-melon and apricot nectar, yielding to apples, green tea and lemongrass and an intriguing, lingering note of petrol. The wine is moderately sweet at entry but segues to dryness as it flows across the palate, reaching a finish that feels profoundly minerally with elements of iodine-washed limestone and flint. Between those points, a lithe silky texture is emboldened by vibrant acidity, a strain of savory, woodsy spices and macerated stone-fruit flavors. 14 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2020 to ’24. Excellent. About $36.
Imported by Petit Pois/Sussex Wine Merchants, Moorestown, N.J.
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Hungarians are justly proud of their indigenous grape, furmint. Tasting through a few furmintexamples recently, I was impressed by the grape’s versatility and its capacity for making wines that are seemingly light-filled and weightless in affect yet layered in complexity of detail and dimension. The Béres Tokaji Furmint 2014, Szaraz, displays a light golden-yellow hue and subtle aromas of ripe lemons, apples and pears; a few moments in the glass unveil notes of straw, heather, thyme and peach. A particular sense of balance between the sweet ripeness of the stone-fruit flavors and the dry, bright acid and mineral structure creates an immensely satisfying effect, the entire package driving leisurely to a limestone and flint-packed finish. 13 percent alcohol. The sort of wine that makes you happy to drink. Now through 2018 or ’19. Winemaker was János Jarecsni. Excellent. About $19, representing Good Value.
Imported by New Wines of Hungary,
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What a beauty this is! The Weingut Eugen Müller Forster Mariengarten Riesling Kabinett, forster2013, Pfalz, is a wild, meadowy, golden, sleek and crystalline riesling whose very pale straw hue almost shimmers in the glass; notes of peaches, lime peel and lychee feel a little slate-y and loamy, though there’s nothing earth-bound about the wine’s delicacy and elegance. A few moments in the glass bring in hints of green apples and cloves, while a sweet entry retains a modest claim of a fairly dry, limestone-etched finish. 9.5 percent alcohol. Now through 2021 to ’23. Excellent. About $19, a local purchase and Real Value.
A Terry Theise Estate Selection, Skurnik Wines, New York.
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gallica
Rosemary Cakebread made only 180 cases of her Gallica Albarino 2015, Calaveras County, so you should call the winery right now and try to reserve a few bottles. The grapes derive from the Rorick Heritage Vineyard, located at about 2,000 feet elevation in the Sierra Foothills; the wine — including a touch of muscat blanc — aged nine months in stainless steel tanks and neutral French oak barrels. A pale yellow-gold hue presages aromas of yellow plums and pears, figs, acacia and heather that evolve to a slightly leafy, grassy quality. What a joyful, lively, expressive personality this wine offers; the texture is supple, suave and elegant, all elements defined by balance and seamlessness yet edging to wild, spicy, savory qualities in the chiseled finish. 14 percent alcohol. Now through 2019 or ’20. Excellent. About $36.
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The Garofoli “Podium” 2013, Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Classico Superiore, podiumincorporates no oak in its making and is all the better for it. Produced in Italy’s Marche region by a family that has been making wine since 1871, this 100 percent verdicchio offers a pure medium gold hue and ravishing aromas of tangerine and peach, jasmine and almond skin and — how else to say it? — rain on Spring flowers, yes, it’s that incredibly fresh and appealing. It’s also, somewhat paradoxically, quite dry and spare though warm, spicy and a bit earthy, enlivened by keen acidity and a scintillating quality of limestone and flint minerality. Again, it’s a wine that feels very satisfying to drink. 13 percent alcohol. Now through 2018 or ’19. Excellent. About $25.
Imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa Calif.
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My reaction on seeing that this white wine aged 22 months in new French oak barriques was a big “Uh-oh.” I mean, friends, that’s a whole heap of new wood influence. However, in the trebbianoMasciarelli Marina Cveti? Trebbiano Riserva 2013, Trebbiano d’Abruzzo, the eponymous winemaker manages to pull off a remarkable feat. The opening salvo is an attractive bright medium straw gold color; then come notes of candied tangerine and grapefruit peel, ginger and quince, cloves and a sort of light rain on dusty stones effect; after a few moments, the wine unfolds hints of lemon balm and roasted lemon, lilac and lavender. Yes, it’s pretty heady stuff. On the palate, this Trebbiano Riserva ’13 feels vital and vibrant, rich and succulent with spiced and slightly baked peach and apricot flavors, though its opulence is held in check by chiming acidity and a resonant chiseled limestone element. You feel the oak in the wine’s framework and foundation but as a supporting factor that lends shape and suppleness rather than as a dominant element. 14 percent alcohol. Quite an achievement for drinking through 2023 to ’25. Excellent. About $43.
Imported by Masciarelli Wine Co., Weymouth, Mass.
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E&J Gallo acquired distribution rights to the venerable family-operated Soave producer Pieropan in March 2015, adding it to Allegrini and Poggio al Tesoro in the company’s Luxury Wine Group. The Pieropan Soave Classico 2015 is a blend of 85 percent garganega grapes and 15 percent trebbiano di Soave, derived from certified organic vineyards. The wine saw no oak but fermented and matured in glass-line cement tanks. The color is pale yellow-gold; aromas of roasted lemons and spiced pears are bright, clean and fresh and permeated by notes of almond blossom, acacia and grapefruit rind. The wine delivers amazing heft and presence for the price category, yet it remains deft and light on its feet; brilliant acidity keeps it lively on the palate, while a saline limestone quality lends depth and poignancy. 12 percent alcohol. Drink through 2018. Excellent. About $20, representing Great Value.
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Steve Hall made the Troon Vineyard Longue Carabine 2014, Applegate Valley, Southern troon-carabineOregon, by co-fermenting different lots of marsanne, viognier, vermentino and roussanne grapes, with slim dollops apparently (depending on what infomation you read) of sauvignon blanc and early muscat. The final proportions of the blend are 38.5 percent vermentino, 33 percent viognier, 27 marsanne and 1.5 roussanne; information as to oak aging, type of oak and length of time is not available. The wine is seriously complex and intriguing. The color is pale straw-gold; the whole effect is spare, high-toned and elegant, with hints of baked peaches and pears, hints of grapefruit, fennel and celery leaf, bee’s-wax, lanolin and flowering heather, all robed in a tremendous acid-and-mineral structure that creates a sense of vital dynamism. above depths of dusty, flinty loam. These elements take time to blossom, the wine being fairly reticent at first. 12.5 percent alcohol. Production was 163 cases. Now through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $34.
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The Two Shepherds Catie’s Corner Viognier 2014, Russian River Valley, offers a 2-shepspale straw-gold hue and beguiling, compelling aromas of jasmine and gardenia, peach and pear, bee’s-wax and lanolin over hints of lime peel and grapefruit pith; the wine sees only neutral French oak, a device that lends shape and suppleness to the structure without incurring undue wood influence. Riveting acidity and a remarkable shapeliness and heft in the texture give the wine tremendous personality and eloquence. Time in the glass bring in notes of heather and thyme, roasted lemon and sage, lemon balm and sour melon, all elements engaged in a remarkably poised feat of crystalline tension and resolution. 13.3 percent alcohol. Brilliant wine-making from William Allen. Now through 2018 or ’19. Production was 75 cases, so go online now. Exceptional. About $26.
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What do you want, friends, charm or structure? You can have both and at a more than decent price bhrouge2015lin Les Vignes de Bila-Haut Rouge 2015, Côtes du Roussillon Villages, from a property in the Languedoc in the eastern foothills of the Pyrenees, owned by Michel Chapoutier since 1999. The wine is a blend of syrah, grenache and carignan grapes that sees no new oak or small barrels. The color is dark ruby shading to a vivid transparent magenta; an immediate impact of freshness and liveliness comes from bright and winsome aromas of ripe black cherries, raspberries and mulberries drenched in notes of rose petals and violets against a background of graphite and sun-baked stone. The texture is fairly dense and chewy, buoyed by vibrant acidity and lithe tannins, all focused on delivering tasty black fruit flavors through a dried herb-and-mineral burnished finish. 14.5 percent alcohol. Nothing complicated or thought-provoking here, just a delicious and well-structured red wine for drinking through 2018. Very Good+. About $15, representing Excellent Value.

Sera Wine Imports, New York. A sample for review.

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