France


The house of Diebolt-Vallois is fairly young for Champagne. Though the Vallois family had been raising vines in the village of Cuis since the 15th Century — think of the heritage that implies! — and the Diebolt family had dieboltbeen living in the village of Cramant since the end of the 19th century, it was only in 1978 that Jacques Diebolt and Nadia Vallois launched the estate that bears their combined names. Their children, Arnaud and Isabelle, work with the parents and take an increasingly active role in running the estate. The product under consideration today (an online purchase) is the non-vintage Diebolt-Vallois Prestige Brut, actually a blanc de blancs, being composed of 100 percent chardonnay grapes. Not mentioned on the label is the fact that all the grapes derive from Grand Cru-ranked villages in Champagne’s Cote des Blancs region. Gosh, this is a beautifully wrought Champagne. The color is ultra pale gold, like platinum blond, set aglow within by the constant shimmer of tiny frothing bubbles. It’s a chiseled Champagne of elegant cheekbones and slim wrists, yet possessing the strength to carry a load of limestone and chalk from first sniff to final sip; you feel the strata of minerals below the vineyards with each encounter. Bare hints of roasted lemon, apple skin, spiced pear and lime peel flesh out its character and appeal, lending beguiling fragrance and lingering but elusive taste. It’s perfectly balanced on the palate, its dense, talc-like mineral nature riven by pinpoint crystalline acidity. I could drink this all day and night, and sort of did. 12.5 percent alcohol. Excellent. Look for prices nationally from $50 to $70.

Petit Pois Corp T/A Sussex Wine Merchants, Moorestown, N.J.
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Here’s an interesting entry for this series, a first sparkling wine from New Zealand. Kim Crawford founded his fizzeponymous winery in 1996 and sold it to Canadian beverage giant Vincor in 2003. That concern in turn was acquired by Constellation Brands in 2006. Today we look at the Kim Crawford Small Parcels Methode Traditionelle Fizz 2009, Marlborough, a blend of 60 percent pinot noir and 40 percent chardonnay. (Winemaker was Anthony Walkenhorst.) This is a delightful sparkling wine, clean, fresh and bright. The color is pale gold, and the tiny bubbles stream upward in a generous swirl. Notes of toasted cinnamon bread and brioche are buoys to hints of roasted lemon, spiced pear and a touch of slightly caramelized tropical fruit. The wine is quite dry and boasts an exquisite structure of oyster shell and limestone that increases its influence through a finish that’s poignant in its delicacy and transparency. Another sparkler with fine bones and interior power. 12 percent alcohol. Drink through 2017 to ’19. Very Good+. About $35.

Constellation Imports, Rutherford, Calif.
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duval lerot rose
The Champagne house mentioned yesterday in this space, Ayala, was founded in 1860. For today’s entry, we skip back one year to 1859, when the house of Duval-Leroy was established by the melding of two well-known families in Champagne. Duval-Leroy is still run by the family, with Carol Duval-Leroy at the head, assisted by her sons, Julien, Charles and Louis. Master of the cave is Sandrine Logette-Jardin. A major contribution of the house to the Champagne industry occurred in 1911, when Raymond Duval-Leroy created the first Champagne made exclusively from Premier Cru vineyards, opening the door to a level of focused, upscale products. Our Champagne today is the Duval-Leroy Premier Cru Rose Prestige, composed of 90 percent pinot noir and 10 percent chardonnay, aged on the lees a minimum of 36 months. The color is an entrancing smoky topaz-light copper hue, given liveliness by a upward surge of tiny bubbles. First, on the nose, come notes of strawberry, raspberry and orange rind, deepened, after a few moments, by hints of brioche and lightly-buttered cinnamon toast, quince and orange marmalade. Make no mistake, this is a high-toned, dry Champagne, flush with elements of limestone and flint, satin and steel, yet immensely appealing in its touches of red berries, cloves and a bracing fillip of sea-salt, all expressed with the utmost delicacy and tenderness over a tensile structure. 12 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $80.

Imported by Terlato Wines International, Lake Bluff, Ill. A sample for review.
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PRBR_Web
Here’s another brut rose, this one from Napa Valley. Priest Ranch is a label of the Somerston Wine Co. that includes Somerston Wines and Highflyer. Craig Becker is general manager and director of winemaking and viticulture. The Priest Ranch Brut Rose 2011, Napa Valley, was made from 100 percent pinot noir grapes. The wine was fermented in stainless steel tanks and neutral French oak barrels; produced in the traditional Champagne method, it spent 18 months in the bottle en tirage, on the lees. The color is medium salmon-topaz with a core of tempest-like tiny bubbles. Lots of steel and flint in evidence, a crisp and lively sparkling wine, it offers notes of blood orange, apple peel and lime with hints of almond skin and orange blossom; a few minutes in the glass nurture elements of sweet red fruit and juicy currants. An intense limestone edge and brisk acidity lead to an austere finish that builds layers of chalk and damp shale. 12.5 percent alcohol. A fresh, lovely, vibrant brut rose for drinking through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $38.

A sample for review.
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Yes, indeed, My Readers, today launches the ninth edition of “Twelve Days of Christmas with Champagne and Sparkling Wine,” and I’m changing the format a bit to accommodate different genres and styles of sparkling wine. Each day of the series, I will offer two examples, one a Champagne (I hope) and the second an alternate sort of sparkling wine, though one post will be devoted to Prosecco because it’s so popular, and producers are trying to make an up-scale shift. As usual, on New Year’s Eve, I’ll offer three or four products at various prices.

So, on we go, enjoy and Merry Christmas!
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ayala
The house of Ayala was founded in 1860 by Edmond de Ayala in the village of Aÿ, which looks like the name of an exotic seductress in a science-fiction movie. The estate was operated by the family until 2005, when it was acquired by Bollinger. The Ayala Brut Majeur, nv, is a blend of 40 percent chardonnay, 40 percent pinot noir and 20 percent pinot meunier. It rests on the lees — the residue of dead yeast cells — in the bottle for an average of eight years. The color is pale gold, set a-shimmer by a frothing surge of tiny glinting bubbles. A prominent architecture of damp limestone and chalk frames beguiling notes of roasted lemon, spiced pear and lightly candied quince and ginger, buoyed by a lithe and animated texture heightened by crisp acidity. From mid-palate back through the finish, the mineral element becomes more pronounced, though that influence only augments this Champagne’s essential crystalline purity and intensity. 12 percent alcohol. I loved this Champagne’s liveliness and elevation. (A local purchase.) Excellent. About $40.

Imported by Vintus LLC, Pleasantville, N.Y.
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bonny doon sparkling albarino
Rare is the occasion when I’m called upon to mention the albariño grape in the same line as sparkling wine, but leave it to Randall Grahm, the indefatigable leader of Bonny Doon Vineyard to explore such an option. Made in the Champagne method of second fermentation in the bottle — now called the “traditional method” outside of Champagne because of EU regulations — the Bonny Doon Sparkling Albariño 2010, Central Coast, offers a mild gold hue and moderate through very pretty effervescence. (This product is finished with a bottle cap, so be careful when you open it.) When first broached, this Sparkling Albariño seems delicate, a creature of soft wings and tender threads, but a few minutes in the glass bring out distinct elements of roasted lemon, baked pineapple and caramel apple, with a back-note of candied citron. It’s quite dry, slightly funky and earthy in a loamy way, and sports a finish that’s savory, bracing and saline. 12.5 percent alcohol. Production was 617 cases. If you have any of this on hand or find a bottle to purchase, by all means try it, but drink up; I think it has reached the distance of its range. Very Good+. About $36.

A sample for review.
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On November 15, I posted a series of reviews about 18 sauvignon blanc wines made in California (here). Today, it’s the turn of 15 sauvignon blancs from other parts of the world: France, New Zealand, Chile and Italy. There’s much to like here, especially if you’re fond of the French styles of the Loire Valley and Bordeaux, but there’s a big surprise from northeastern Italy at a bargain price too. As usual, in the Weekend Wine Notes, I eschew technical, historical and geographical data in favor of quick incisive mentions designed to pique the interest and whet the palate. Most of these wines were samples for review; a few were tasted at distributors’ trade events.

The absence of label illustrations in the New Zealand section below is because the websites associated with the several wineries or importers were either extremely user-unfriendly, inadequate or hopelessly out of date.
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France
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jolivet sancerre
Pascal Jolivet Sancerre 2014, Loire Valley. 12.5% alc. 100% sauvignon blanc. Very pale straw-gold hue; clean, fresh, crisp and appealing; notes of roasted lemon, lemon balm and tangerine; pulls up hints of lemongrass and slightly dusty dried herbs; lithe and supple, exquisitely balanced and energized; increasingly dry and heady with limestone minerality. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $24.
Frederick Wildman & Sons, New York.
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sancerre-blanc--caves-monmousseau
Domaine Justin Monmousseau Sancerre 2014, Loire Valley. 100% sauvignon blanc. Pale straw color; first the limestone and chalk, then a snap of gun-flint; roasted lemon and verbena, bay and thyme, with a citrus undertow; very dry, a little austere but seductive in its talc-like texture riven by scintillating acidity. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $24.
USA Wine Imports, New York
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EXEM Blanc
EXEM 2014, Bordeaux. 12% alc. 60% sauvignon blanc, 40% semillon. Very pale straw color; gooseberry, grapefruit and lime peel, notes of leafy fig, roasted lemon and currant; pert, tart and sassy; tasty citrus flavors with a hint of spiced pear; pleasing texture, part lush, part lithe. Now through 2016. Very Good+. About $13.
Winesellers Ltd., Niles, Ill.
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esprit bordeaux blanc
Esprit Saint-Sulpice 2014, Bordeaux Blanc. 12.5% alc. Sauvignon blanc 80%, semillon 20%. Pale gold hue; very clean, fresh and bright; green apple, lemons and orange blossom, just a hint of grass and dried herbs, and touches of lime peel and mango; lovely powdery texture but lively with crisp acidity; quite dry, finishes with a tide of damp limestone. Truly charming. Very Good+. About $17.
Fredric Wildman & Sons, New York.
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hauts de smith
Les Hauts de Smith 2011, Pessac-Leognan. 13% alc. Medium straw-gold hue; spiced pear, quince and ginger, whiffs of honeysuckle and acacia, fennel and lavender; quite dry but juicy with grapefruit and peach flavors hinting at a sunny leafy fig character and a bell-tone of black currant; layers of limestone and flint minerality lead to a fairly austere finish animated by brisk acidity; overall impression is of substance balanced by elegance and transparency. Now through 2020 to 2022. Excellent. About $45.
Joanne Bordeaux, Jersey City, N.J.
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tour
Chateau Tour Leognan 2013, Pessac-Leognan Blanc. 12.5% alc. 70% sauvignon blanc, 30% semillon. Fairly NZ-like for a Bordeaux blanc, with snappy pea-shoot, lime peel and grapefruit qualities, crisp and lively, featuring jazzed-up acidity and loads of limestone and flint; very fresh, charming and appealing, good balance and presence. Now through 2016 into 2017. Very Good+. About $22.
Monsieur Touton Selections, New York.
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chateau-villa-bel-air-graves-france-10213716
Chateau Villa Bel-Air 2013, Graves. 13% alc. 65% sauvignon blanc, 35% semillon. Very pale gold color; clean, crisp, delicate; honeysuckle, cloves and fennel, notes of grapefruit and candied orange rind, quince and ginger and a lingering after-glow of lychee and something faintly resiny; lovely shape and tone, set chiming with keen acidity and limestone minerality. Now through 2017 to ’18. Excellent. About $25.
Verity Wine Partners, New York
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New Zealand
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Mud House Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Marlborough. 13% alc. 100% sauvignon blanc. Very pale straw color; a winsome and layered bouquet of grapefruit, pea-shoot, tangerine and lime peel, with notes of new-mown grass, timothy and thyme, gooseberry and a tinge of currant; a top-note of jasmine; smooth segue into the mouth, very dry with an almost powdery texture shot with fleet acidity; cleansing limestone and chalk minerality. Totally charming. Now through 2017. Excellent. About $17.
Imported by Accolade Wines North America, Napa, Calif.
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Mt. Beautiful Sauvignon Blanc 2014, North Canterbury. 13% alc. 100% sauvignon blanc. Pale straw-yellow; lime peel and pea-shoot, notes of grapefruit, lychee and greengage; lively and ebullient but not flamboyant; lovely talc-like texture buoyed by bright acidity; very dry, lots of limestone and flint, a fairly austere finish. Now through 2017. Very Good+. About $16.
Mt. Beautiful USA, Bernecia, Calif.
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Nobilo Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Marlborough. 12.5% alc. Pale gold color; pea-shoot, pear, lime peel and grapefruit; celery seed and caraway; crisp and lively with taut acidity; permeated by elements of damp limestone and shale, especially from mid-palate through the finish; direct and appealing, with a lovely texture. Rink up. Very Good+. About $13.
Constellation Imports, Madera, Calif.
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Nobilo Icon Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Marlborough. 12% alc. 100% sauvignon blanc. Pale straw-gold; very clean, fresh, pure and vibrant; a distinctly meadowy sauvignon blanc, with notes of celery seed and caraway, grapefruit and lime peel, pea-shoot and fig; an attractively leafy, grassy and citrusy wine, quite dry and tart and finishing with grapefruit pith and limestone. Lots of character and personality. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $20.
Constellation Imports, Gonzales, Calif.
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Starborough Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Marlborough. 12.5% alc. 100% sauvignon blanc. A Gallo label. Very pale gold; defines what we think of as the Oz style in sauvignon blanc: lime peel, gooseberry, grapefruit, pea-shoot, kiwi and lychee; snappy, tart and pungent; shimmering limestone element. Drink up. Very Good. About $15.
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Italy
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Prodigo Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Friuli Grave. 12% alc. 100% sauvignon blanc. Pale straw-gold; restrained and prodigodelicate, yet intense and penetrating; blooming with jasmine and almond blossom; mint and heather, tarragon and pea shoot, roasted lemon and lime peel; utterly beguiling and seductive; keen acidity powering limestone and flint minerality. Now through 2017. Excellent. About $11, a Bargain of the Century.
Imported by Winesellers Ltd., Niles, Ill.
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Chile
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Concha y Toro Ribera del Rapel Gran Reserva Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Colchagua Valley. 13% alc. 100% sauvignon Gran_Reserva_Sauvignon_Blanc_Label_NV-300x259blanc. Pale straw hue; grapefruit, yellow plum, fennel and celery seed, notes of gooseberry, thyme and tarragon; taut, lithe and crisp, with tons of presence and tone; a full complement of limestone and flint minerality, energized by vibrant acidity; terrific balance and integration. Now through 2017. Excellent. About $17, representing Great Value.
Excelsior Wines, Old Brookville, N.Y.
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Concha y Toro Costa Terrunyo Los Boldos Vineyard Block 5 Sauvignon Blanc 2012, Casablanca Valley. 13% alc. 100% Terrunyo_Sauvignon_Blanc_Front_Label-300x218sauvignon blanc. Pale gold color; smoke and steel; celery seed, fennel, tarragon; grapefruit and lime peel; very dry, crisp and dynamic, with deep reserves of limestone and chalk; focuses on spiced pear and peach flavors, off-set by slightly astringent herbal elements; one of the best sauvignon blanc wines I have tasted from Chile. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $26, and Worth It.
Excelsior Wines, Old Brookville, N.Y.
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Let’s utter a cheer or two for wines that require no contemplation or furrowed brows, just a requirement for pleasure and enjoyment. Such a one is the Vignes de Bila-Haut Côtes du Roussillon Villages 2014, from an area so deep into southwest France that if you bhrouge14front stumble over a rock, you’ll fall into Spain. The steep, stony property, a refuge for the Knights Templar in the Middle Ages, was acquired in 1999 by Michel Chapoutier, who needs no introduction to fans of profound wines from the Rhone Valley, pretty far east along the great curve of the Mediterranean coastline. The Bila-Haut Côtes du Roussillon Villages 2014 is dominated by the syrah grape, with dollops of grenache and carignan; the wine has no oak contact, fermenting and aging in concrete vats. The color is a brilliant medium ruby with a trace of violet; the bouquet is bright and engaging, offering a florid display of black and red currants and plums with notes of ripe blackberry, briers and brambles, dried thyme and sage. Moderate tannins provide support for voluptuously ripe and spicy black and red fruit flavors, held in check by keen acidity and an essential graphite-tinged mineral element. The emphasis is on deliciousness and savor. 14 percent alcohol. We happily drank this bottle with a pizza made at home, with toppings of roasted red peppers, tomatoes, hickory-smoked bacon, black olives and Italian parsley. Very Good+. About $15, representing Fine Value.

An R. Shack Selection for HB Wine Merchants, New York. A sample for review.

The Domaine Ostertag Vignoble d’E Riesling 2012, from Alsace, where France borders Germany, feels like a golden wine, burnished and RIESLING10glowing. The estate was founded in 1966 and went to full biodynamic practices in 1998. The color is a lovely mild gold hue; aromas of green apple, peaches and pears are highlighted by notes of orange rind and jasmine, with tantalizing hints of candied quince and ginger. It’s a very dry wine that scintillates with chiseled elements of limestone and flint, set ringing by bright acidity, even while it envelops the palate with juicy and spicy stone-fruit flavors. The whole package feels animated, polished and elegant. 12.5 percent alcohol. Try with charcuterie, pork chops with apples, trout in brown butter and capers, seafood risotto, through 2018 to 2020. Excellent. About $20.

Imported by Kermit Lynch, Berkeley, Calif. A sample for review. The label image is two vintages behind.

At first, your reaction to the deep ruby-magenta Stéphane Aviron Beaujolais-Villages 2013 will be, “Oh, goody, pure black raspberries avironand black cherries!” Why ask for more, right? Give it a few moments in the glass, though, and notes of cloves, lavender and violets creep in, followed by tinges of graphite and loam. A little plum, dark and spicy; a bit of cranberry, fresh and tart. It’s a tasty wine, actually delicious, but quite dry, with a definite mineral edge to the lithe finish. 13 percent alcohol. The wine is made from 100 percent gamay grapes, as it must be in Beaujolais, from vines 50 years old and older. It undergoes whole-cluster fermentation and ages briefly in old 50 hectoliter puncheons, that is, large barrels that hold 1,320.86 gallons; the standard French oak barrel for aging wine holds 59 gallons. The point is that the wine should possess shape and tone — much like human beings — but no taint of wood to inhibit freshness and flavor. Beaujolais-Villages is a versatile wine; we drank this with last night’s pizza of basil, roasted fennel and red onions with three cheeses and a dash of peppered salami. Really charming. Very Good+. About $15, a local purchase.

Imported by Frederick Wildman & Sons, New York, whose website has not caught up to the vintage of the wine under discussion.

In the French language, the word is cidre, and it’s a tradition in Normandy and Brittany going back thousands of years. Those areas in northwest France, by the Atlantic Ocean and English Channel, are inhospitable to wine grapes but perfect for apples. Cider-applesmaking began with the Celts and continued with the Romans in a heritage that passes through Charlemagne — a cider-loving sovereign — almost unbroken through the history of France and northern Europe and England unto the present age, anywhere that apple orchards thrive, including North America. Cider is fermented apple juice, as wine is fermented grape juice. The reality, of course, is rather more complicated, but today’s post is a suggestion, not a treatise, though a few basic facts can’t hurt. First, the best apples for cider-making are sour and bitter, the “spitters,” in terms of your mouth’s reaction to biting into one. The best ciders, however, are made from a combination of many different types of apples, to lend balance and depth. Cider tends to be lower in alcohol than wine because even the sweetest apples embody less sugar than grapes. Finally, only in America is a distinction made between “cider” and “hard cider,” the first being just apple juice, the second being the mildly alcoholic beverage that the rest of the world terms “cider.”

Today, we look at six examples of cider — or cidre — from Normandy and Brittany, the heartland of cider-making. These ciders issue from small, family-owned farm-orchards and represent a level of character that might startle those used to commercial or factory-produced ciders in America. All are sparkling ciders marketed in the standard 750 milliliter bottle. I thought they were all intriguing, elemental, highly individual and excellent.

Imported by Winesellers, Ltd, Niles, Ill.; samples for review. Apple image from jamesbeard.org.
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Brittany, the thumb of France that juts out into the Atlantic Ocean, is represented here by Le Brun de Bretagne, which has been brun ciderproducing cider by traditional methods since 1955. The names of apples are as exotic as the names of roses or tomatoes. For these two ciders from Le Brun, the apples are Kermerrien, Marie Ménard, Douce Moên, Peau de Chien (“skin of the dog”) and Douce Coëtligné. The Le Brun Brut Cidre is a clean, brassy-gold color and offers mild and pleasing effervescence. Twist the cork — carefully — and a swoonable aroma of ripe apples bursts from the bottle. There’s something a bit fleshy and floral about this cider, a little musky and autumnal, like damp straw, apple peel and almond skin, and the finish offers a tinge of fresh wood shavings. Lovely, crisp, very dry. 5.5 percent alcohol. About $9. Le Brun Organic Cidre is certified organic by Ecocert. This is a demi-sec or medium dry cider, which to my palate is still pretty darned dry. You feel the tannins rummaging through your taste buds, though they are soften by notes of spiced and baked apple, apple skin and a hint of lemony cloves. The finish brings in a touch of elemental bitterness and rootiness. 4 percent alcohol. About $10.
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Domaine de la Minotière is a 37-acre single domain of apple orchards in Normandy — or 15 acres, depending on which piece of paper one minotiere ciderlooks at. Anyway, the orchards are cultivated completely under certified organic practices. The Cidre Fermier Brut Bio displays a bright gold color, a frothy head quick to elapse and aromas of ripe apples, orange peel, apple blossom and what cider devotees call “horse blanket,” which I assume refers to what I perceive as a musty, sweaty, feral aspect that is not unpleasant; in my notes, I wrote, “smells like apples & trees & leaves & earth.” Quite dry and with tannins to pucker the palate, this cider is crisp, lively and almost viscous. 5 percent alcohol. About $11. The stablemate is the Cidre Fermier Bio Doux, which for a cider marked beyond “Medium Sweet” and into the lower end of “Sweet” felt pretty dry to my sensibility, though a softening of the dry, tannic edge was distinctly perceivable. Here the bright bronze-gold color is tinged with green highlights, and the scents and flavors of cedar, orange peel, slightly musty jasmine and spiced pear are very attractive. 3 percent alcohol. I could drink this cider with duck a l’orange, rabbit terrine with fig sauce or a selection of soft cheeses. About $11.
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The Manoir de Grandouet is a third generation farm run by Stephane and Lucile Grandval in Normandy’s Pays d’Auge region. In addition manoir ciderto cider, the Grandvals make Calvados, a brandy distilled from apples. The couple recommends keeping their ciders for up to two years, well-stored, to allow them to develop the aromas further. Their Cidre Fermier Brut — dry farmhouse cider — exhibits a clean, brassy gold hue and beguiling scents of apples, orchards, roots, autumn leaves and a slightly wilted floral arrangement. It’s very dry, dense, almost chewy yet with a sleek lithe structure; close to the best part of it is its dazzling balance among tannin, acid, fruit and the hint of leathery, leafy bitterness that enlivens the finish. 5 percent alcohol. About $11, and My Favorite of this sextet. The Cambremer Cidre de tradition Pays d’Auge is billed as demi-sec but felt fairly dry to my palate. The color is radiant medium-gold, and the bouquet is ripe, musky, dusty and foresty, with notes of heather, mashed and slightly cooked apples and spiced pears. Tannins feel soft and finely sifted. About $13.
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It’s not too early to think about wines for Thanksgiving dinner, so let’s get to it. Today I’m recommending a red wine that may be off touraine-tradition-rouge-caves-monmousseauthe maps for most American consumers but really deserves their attention. The Justin Monmousseau Touraine Tradition 2012 hails from the region of Touraine in France’s central Loire Valley. The house of Monmouuseau, founded in 1886 by Alcide Monmousseau, devotes 70 percent of its production to sparkling wines from a range of Loire Valley AOCs, all made in the méthode traditionnelle, but fortunately the estate also produces still red and white wines. The Monmousseau Touraine Tradition 2012 is a blend of 69 percent côt grapes (malbec); 30 percent cabernet franc; and a bare 1 percent gamay, fermented and aged only in stainless steel vats. The result is a wine with tremendous liveliness and elevation that offers a medium ruby color shading to a violet hue and penetrating aromas of ripe, fleshy blackberries, black cherries and plums, permeated by black pepper and allspice, underbrush and loam. The wine displays a lovely, bright structure on the palate, with fruit that leans toward well-spiced blackberry and blueberry flavors and — the effect of that mere dollop of gamay — an irresistible vivacious note of wild red raspberries, with that characteristic brambly, leafy element, this generous panoply upheld by an influx of dusty tannins. NA% alcohol, but not high. Serve slightly chilled and drink up with pleasure. Very Good+. About $16.

Tasted at a private wine event.

Maison Jaffelin dates back to 1816 and is one of the few estates that still makes wine in the ancient city of Beaune, the heart and blanc de blancsnerve-center of Burgundy. The estate’s facility occupies a 12th Century edifice and cellars, where they utilize the traditional vertical press and oval wooden vats. We look today not at the company’s red and white still wines from various villages and vineyards but at a delightful sparkling wine, the Jaffelin Blanc de Blancs Brut, Crémant de Bourgogne, made from 100 percent chardonnay grapes. The color is pale gold, shimmering with an intense stream of tiny, foaming bubbles; the bouquet is very lemony and steely but offers notes of verbena, lemon balm and spiced pear and nicely manages to be slightly saline and a bit creamy together. In the mouth, this sparkling wine is framed by vigorous acidity and rigorous limestone minerality, resulting in a high-toned and fairly austere effect from mid-palate back through the finish. At the same time, it’s exhilarating and tasty with hints of citrus and stone-fruit flavors. 12.5 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $25, a local purchase.

A Steven Berardi Selection for Martinicus Wines, Beverly Hills, Fla.

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