France


Imagine being so famous that people can use your first name and everyone knows who they’re talking about. As in: “Fredric just posted to his blog,” and billions of earthlings go “oooohhh” and “aaaahhh.” Anyway, as multitudes are aware, the Hollywood stars Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, in partnership with the Perrin family of Chateau de Beaucastel in Chateauneuf-du-Pape, last year released the first wine from their Chateau Miraval property, a Côtes de Provence Rosé 2012. I didn’t try that wine but we just drank the second release, the Chateau Miraval 2013, and it’s a honey. Every aspect of this product is thoughtfully and exquisitely executed, including the elegant bottle that resembles an old-style Champagne bottle, and the understated, even reticent label. The wine is a blend of the red cinsault, grenache and syrah grapes with a dollop of the white rolle, the Italian vermentino. The entrancing color is the palest copper-onion skin-topaz with the faintest pink flush; aromas of fresh strawberries and dried red currants are subtly woven with notes of dried thyme, flint and limestone, with a hint of tangerine. Though in its nuanced red fruit flavors this rose is slightly savory and saline, it embodies the utmost in delicate and ineffable character, while retaining the vibrancy of definitive acidity and the vitality of a scintillating mineral element. Compulsively drinkable, and without the taint of amateurish that often comes with “celebrity” wines; this is the real thing. 13 percent alcohol. Excellent. Prices around the country range from about $24 to $30.

Imported by Vineyard Brands, Birmingham, Ala. Sample provided by a local retailer.

Sliding a medium rare leg of lamb studded with garlic and rosemary from the grill? How about pork chops doused with olive oil and soy sauce and rubbed with cumin and chili powder? You carnivores getting hungry? How about opening a bottle of Eric Texier Côtes du Rhône 2011 to accompany these primal dishes? That would be a good idea. Texier, a nuclear engineer turned winemaker, takes a meticulous approach to his wines, whether estate-grown or made from grapes purchased on long-term contract. His methods in the vineyard are organic, his techniques in the winery traditional and minimal. This wine is a blend of about 80 percent grenache with the remainder portions of the white grapes grenache blanc, clairette and bourboulenc. Texier tends to age his reds in neutral barrels and large old futs. The color is an entrancing medium ruby hue with a tinge of violet; aromas of lightly spiced and macerated raspberries and red and black currants are woven with elements of briers and brambles and dusty graphite; a few moments in the glass bring in notes of plums, leather and lavender. This is a dry wine, a bit raspy with slightly knotty tannins, but eminently drinkable and tasty with red and black fruit flavors, all bolstered by clean, bright acidity and an underlying granitic mineral quality. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2016 or ’17. Very Good+. About $15.

Imported by Louis/Dressner, New York. A sample for review. Label image from hogsheadwine.

The temperature is rising in many parts of the U.S.A., and we as a people are in desperate need of refreshment. Turn, then, I say, to the tasty, often surprisingly complex and reasonably-priced sparkling wines called Crémant d’Alsace. These are made in that rather Germanic northeastern region of France in the time-honored manner of Champagne, though here called méthode traditionelle, usually from such grapes as chardonnay, pinot blanc, pinor gris, pinor noir and reisling, sometimes in blends, sometimes as single variety. The examples mentioned today are “non-vintage” products, meaning, actually, that they are “multi-vintage,” that is, a blend of several vintages, a practice widely employed wherever sparkling wines are made. These are incredibly satisfying and refreshing sparklers, as appropriate in the kitchen and dining room as they are on the porch or patio, at poolside or on a picnic, served chilled, of course, and in a tall flute so you can appreciate the color and the stream of tiny bubbles. Drink up! Have Fun! Enjoy! It’s Summertime!

These wines were samples for review.
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The Willm Brut Blanc de Blancs is designated Vin Mousseux de Qualité rather than Crémant d’Alsace, the implication being that grapes from outside Alsace may be included. The wine is composed of 100 percent pinot blanc grapes. The color is very pale gold, and the mousse is a pleasing froth of tiny bubbles. Pointed aromas of green apples and spiced pears are wreathed with notes of peach and jasmine, with a hint of lime peel; the entry is slightly sweet, in a ripe fruit sort of manner, but from mid-palate back through the limestone-laden finish it’s dry, elevated by crisp acidity, and a bit saline. All in all, a fresh and refreshing sparkling wine. 12 percent alcohol. Very Good+. About $16, representing Good Value. .

Imported by Monsieur Touton Selections, New York.
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The Cattin family arrived in Alsace from Switzerland in 1720; the estate is operated by the descendents of its original founders. The Joseph Cattin “Brut Cattin” Crémant d’Alsace is a blend, differing according to year, of pinot blanc, pinot gris, riesling and chardonnay; the vineyards are sustainably farmed, with average age of vines for this product being 40 years. The wine offers a pale gold hue and a lovely and persistent effervescence; notes of lemon and grapefruit, almond skin and lime peel shade into hints of lilac and flint. This is a very dry sparkling wine, no playing around with flirty sweetness here, yet the vastly appealing texture is talc-like, almost cloud-like, though energized by incisive acidity and crystalline limestone-and-flint minerality. 12 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $19, and a Bargain at the Price.

Imported by T. Edward Wines, New York.
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Philippe and Pascal Zinck farm their 56 acres of vines organically. The Domaine Zinck Brut Rosé, Crémant d’Alsace, 100 percent pinot noir, sports an entrancing pale copper-salmon color enlivened by hordes of tiny glinting bubbles. Aromas of pure strawberry and raspberry waft from the glass, permeated by notes of orange rind, cloves and rose petals; bright acidity and seashell-like minerality keep a slightly creamy texture clean, bright and crisp under subtle flavors of smoky and spicy red currants and raspberries; the finish is dry and imbued with limestone and shale elements. 12 percent alcohol. Very Good+. About $24.

Imported by HB Wine Merchants, New York.
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Does it help to say that I could drink the François Schmitt Blanc de Noirs Crémant d’Alsace every day? The estate was founded in 1697; François Schmitt took over the family domaine in the 1970s and now runs things with his son Frédéric. This is 100 percent pinot noir with no dosage, so bone-dry does not begin to describe the wine’s scintillating, limestone-powered attitude. The color is very pale gold, like old jewelry; bubbles are fine, tempestuous, tenacious; the whole package seems to glitter with an edge of steel, limestone and flint. There’s a hint of almond skin and hazelnuts, a note of biscuits, a touch of some astringent little white flower, evanescent and ineffable. The effect is of elegance and hauteur, yet this high-toned sparkler is eminently drinkable. 12 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $28.

Imported by Fruit of the Vine, Riahi Selections, Long Island City, New York.
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Domaine de la Bastide occupies the sort of compound and possesses the kind of history that make American Francophiles swoon. Built as a fortified farmhouse by the Knights Templar in the 12th or 13th Century, it became, after the suppression of the Templars by Philip IV in 1307, first a Benedictine and then a Dominican monastery. Defrocked, as it were, during the French Revolution, the ancient property passed through various hands, until it came under ownership of the Boyer family. The estate, lying in the heart of the Southern Rhone Valley about 34 miles north of Avignon, is run today by Vincent and Stephanie Boyer. This domaine is not properly a bastide. Those “new towns” were built in southwestern France in the 13th and 14th centuries to help repopulate the area after the devastation of the Albigensian Crusade (or the Slaughter of the Cathars, if you believe that the gentle sect should have been left in peace). If you visit Bordeaux, for example, the landscape, especially in Entre-Deux-Mers, is filled with these medieval market towns, laid out in a distinctive grid, their commercial squares surrounded by arcades.

Anyway, the Domaine de la Bastide “Figue” 2013, Côtes du Rhône Rosé, is an interesting example of the genre because it’s made from white grapes: viognier, grenache blanc and clairette. (The wine’s nickname derives from the many old fig trees on the property.) The ethereal pale onion skin hue is the result of skin contact, even though the skins of white grapes contain very little pigment. The wine is a congeries of delicate nuance, tissues of hints and nods: A scent of slightly overblown Summer roses precedes subtle notes of green apple, red currants, faint peach and a touch of melon; a few moments in the glass bring out a wisp of dried thyme. This fresh and refined rose offers a surprisingly lush and vibrant texture buoyed by pert acidity and a scintillating limestone element; lilac comes into the mix, a touch of talc, a tinge of sour melon and lemon drop. In a sense, one could call this a white wine gently disguised as rosé. 13 percent alcohol. A lovely wine for drinking through 2014. Very Good+ and a Bargain at about $14.

Bonhomie Wine Imports, South Orange, N.J. A sample for review.

And, boy, are they eclectic! And sort of electric in effect, by which I mean snappy, vivid, lively and crisp. Some are fairly straightforward, fruity and appealing; a few others are more complicated and inspire a little contemplation, though in these languid, humid days, a bit of contemplation harmonizes with the lap of waves at the beach or the plock-plock of tennis balls or the creak of the rope that supports your gently swaying hammock. We touch Chile, Spain, Italy, Germany, Alsace in France and several regions of Italy and California today, as well as a dazzling range of grape varieties. As usual with the Weekend Wine Notes, my goal is not to overload your sensibility with technical, historical, geological data, as I might in more extensive reviews but to offer incisive impressions that will pique your interest and whet your palate. Contemplating an afternoon at a picnic, by the pool, on the porch or patio? Any of these white wines would serve you well.

These wines were samples for review.
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Albamar Sauvignon Blanc 2013, Casablanca Valley, Chile. 12.5% alc. Very pale straw-gold color; notably fresh and zingy; lychee and pear, lime peel and grapefruit, jasmine and honeysuckle; hints of celery seed, fennel and fig; leafy, sprightly, with a scintillating limestone edge; plenty of verve and clarity. Drink through 2015. Very Good+. About $11, a Sure-Fire Bargain.
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Blanco Nieva Pie Franco Verdejo 2012, Rueda, Spain. 13% alc. 100% verdejo grapes. Light gold color; clean, crisp and vibrant; bee’s-wax, sea salt, roasted lemon, lime peel, limestone, little waxy flowers; very nicely knit and well-balanced; bracing acidity and salinity, with a dry finish that offers a pleasing touch of candied grapefruit. Very attractive and refreshing; lots of personality. Now through 2015. Excellent. About $23.

The label image is one vintage behind.
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Conundrum 2012, California. 13.5% alc. Chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, semillon, muscat canelli, viognier. Is Conundrum getting drier? Is that why I actually liked this vintage of the well-known white blend? Pale gold color; fully-fleshed out notes of peaches and spiced pears, lychee and riesling-like petrol; operatically floral in the lilac and honeysuckle range, some muscat-tinged muskiness; a touch of sweetness going in but felt more as plush ripeness; crisp yet lush, sleek, polished, sophisticated; very dry finish etched with limestone. Now through 2015. Excellent. About $22, often discounted.
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Dry Creek Vineyards Dry Chenin Blanc 2013, Clarksburg. 13% alc. Pale gold color; hay, roasted lemon, acacia and dried thyme; savory, spare and bracing yet graceful; hints of yellow stone fruit and tangerine; background of damp stone minerality; all bound by crisp acidity. Quite charming. Very Good+. About $12, a Great Bargain.
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Hugel et Fils Gewurztraminer “Hugel” 2011, Alsace. 14% alc. Very pale gold color; lychee, peach and spiced pear; notes of lemon curd, honeysuckle and preserved lemon; dry but juicy with stone-fruit and hints of citrus and green apple; a cool wine, shot through with limestone and flint minerality, warmed by touches of cloves and allspice; ultimately spare, elegant, slightly astringent on the finish. Now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $22.
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J Vineyards Pinot Gris 2013, California. 13.8% alc. Light gold color; lemon and lime peel, delicate notes of honeysuckle, thyme and sage, lemon oil and orange blossom, crushed gravel undertones; very crisp and refreshing though spare and lithe; pith and peel and the bracing astringent bitterness that attends them, yet a wisp of slightly overripe peach under the spareness and a hint at briers and loamy earthiness. A thoughtful and appealing rendition of the grape, surprisingly complex for the price. Excellent. About $16, a Terrific Bargain.
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Masseria Li Veli Fiano 2012, Puglia. 13% alc. 100% fiano grapes. Pale gold color, tinge of green; cloves and allspice, jasmine and smoke; roasted lemon and bee’s-wax, talc and limestone; clean, dry and savory; lovely body, cloud-like density and supple texture but spurred by bracing acidity. Irresistibly tasty. Very Good+. About $11, representing Wonderful Value.
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St. Urbans-Hof Bockstein Ockfen Riesling Kabinett 2012, Mosel, Germany. 8% alc. A reisling of scintillating purity and ethereal refinement; very pale gold color; delicately struck notes of jasmine and apricot, mango and lychee, lemon peel and almond skin; vivid acidity sends an electric wave across the palate though the ultimate effect is never less than utmost elegance and elevation; a texture almost lush exquisitely balanced by the acid and the bright limestone minerality. Now through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $18 to $20.
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Senorio de Rubios Albarino 2010, Rias Baixas, Spain. 12.5% alc. How well does albarino age? Beautifully, in this case. I don’t usually include
wines that are Worth a Search in the Weekend Wine Notes, but this 2010 was the sample I received, even though, apparently, the 2012 is available. Light gold color; my first reaction, “Gosh, how lovely”; not as fresh as it would have been two years ago, perhaps, but with a depth of spice and richness; roasted lemon, lemon balm and baked pear; camellia, quince and ginger; very dry, saline and savory, slightly honeyed entry leading to an earthy, limestone-inflected finish that’s a bit austere. Drink up. Very Good+ leaning toward Excellent. About $18.
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Toad Hollow Francine’s Selection Unoaked Chardonnay 2012, Mendocino County. 13.9% alc. Pale gold color; lively, clean and bright, very dry, crisp and pert; notes of lemon and mango, hint of jasmine; lots of serious limestone minerality enlivened by a grapefruit finish. Quite refreshing. Very Good+. About $14.
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Trimbach Pinot Blanc 2011, Alsace. 12.5% alc. Very pale gold color; pear, peach and lychee, yellow plum; tantalizing floral elements, like memories of dewy violets and lilacs; a precise and incisive wine, layered with flint and limestone, crystalline acidity; earthy, though, a bit dusty; the entire effect clean, resonant and elegant. Now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $17, representing Great Value.
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Zenato Lugana 2012, San Benedetto, Veneto. 13% alc. 100% trebbiano di Lugana grapes. Very pale shimmering gold color; super attractive, with notes of jasmine and orange rind, talc and lilac, mango and spiced pear; slightly honeyed, with hints of bee’s-wax and lanolin; touches of dried thyme and rosemary, with the latter’s slightly resinous quality; notably clean and fresh, chiming acidity and a seashell-like minerality. I could drink this all Summer. Very Good+. About $14, marking A Notable Bargain.

The label image is one vintage behind.
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Mother’s Day is Sunday, so right now I offer six selections of sparkling wine and Champagne to honor your Mom, toast her presence or memory and basically perform your duty as a child, which you will always be as long as either or both of your parents are among the living. No beverage is more festive that Champagne or sparkling wine — the latter designation for such products made outside of France’s Champagne region — and lord knows, your Mom deserves some festivity and honor after what she put up with all these years, n’est-ce pas? Prices range from just under $20 to over $60, so I hope there’s a bottle of bubbles here that will suit varying budgets. I include two sparkling wines from Italy and two from California, each of diverse spirit, and two Champagnes, also made in different styles; three of these products are rosés, making them even more celebratory. The sparkling wines were samples for review; I bought the Champagnes. Enjoy! And be good to your Mom!
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Carpenè Malvolti Extra Dry (nv), Prosecco Conigliano Valdobbiadene, Italy. 11% alc. 100% glera grapes. Pale pale gold color; green apples, almond skin and lemon curd, hint of lime peel; slightly sweet entry but dry from mid-palate back through the tingly, modestly spicy finish; quite clean, crisp and lively. Enticing by itself, or use in a Bellini with peach nectar. Very Good+. About $19.
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Sofia Blanc de Blancs 2012, Monterey County, California. 12% alc. Pinot blanc 74%, riesling 16%, muscat 10%; Pale gold color with brisk effervescence; jasmine and orange blossom, spiced pears; hints of lime peel and orange rind, roasted lemon; sprightly, engaging, just off-dry; touch of limestone minerality; backnote of biscuits and toasted hazelnuts. Very pleasant for casual sipping. Very Good+. About $19.
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Berlucchi Cuvée 61 Franciacorta Rosé (nv), Lombardy, Italy. 12.5% alc. Chardonnay 50%, pinot noir 50%. Lovely copper-salmon color, persistent stream of frothy bubbles; pop the cork and you smell strawberries from a foot away; add orange rind, almond skin and honeysuckle; pert, tart and sassy (my law firm), slightly sweet in the beginning but quickly transitions to bone dry; notes of lemon and lemon curd balanced by the acidity previously referred to and more than a hint of seashell minerality. Quite charming and beautifully structured. Excellent. About $35.
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Inman Family Brut Rosé 2012, Russian River Valley, California. 12% alcohol. 100% pinot noir. Pale pale pink color, almost virginal; a torrent of tiny bubbles; dried strawberries and raspberries, hints of brambles and lightly buttered cinnamon toast; a spine of bright acidity supporting a framework of scintillating limestone minerality; very dry, with spare red currant and stone-fruit flavors, hint of spiced pear, all elements woven with steely delicacy and elegance. Delightful, marvelous sparkling wine. Excellent. About $56.
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Henriot Souverain Brut (nv), Champagne, France. 12% alc. Chardonnay 40%, pinot noir 60%. Medium straw-gold color, wildly effervescent; biscuits and fresh bread, pears, lime peel and ginger, notes of limestone and chalk that take on increased resonance; vivacious acidity, almost glittering limestone minerality; lovely personality and verve, refreshing balance of savory and saline elements; irresistibly appealing. Excellent. I paid $62, but prices around the country go as low at $42.
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Paul Bara Grand Rosé Brut (nv), Champagne, France. 12% alc. Pinot noir 80%, chardonnay 20%, all Grand Cru vineyards. Pure topaz in hue; billions of tiny glinting bubbles; macerated strawberries, cloves, orange marmalade, hint of brioche, notes of chalk and flint; full-bodied, lots of presence and a powerful limestone element, yet wreathed with ethereal touches of dried red currants and rose petals, slightly biscuity; bone-dry with chiming acidity; tremendous class and breeding. Excellent. I paid about $69, but it can be found as cheaply as $45 if you look.
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“NV” stands for “non-vintage,” though on the face of it, that’s a ridiculous proposition. All grapes are harvested in a particular year; hence those dates on wine labels and the notion that some vintages are better than others so the wines from those years are more valuable. However, wine does not have to be made from grapes harvested all in the same year. The great example of this concept occurs in Champagne, the famed French region of prestigious bubbles, where something more than 80 percent of the product is non-vintage, though the term “multi-vintage” is really more useful. Champagne producers maintain stores of reserve wines to blend with the wine from the current vintage being used (generally about three years old) to ensure a consistent house style. Other wines employ the multi-vintage trope, including, surprisingly, Portugal’s Vinho Verde, “surprisingly” because Vinho Verde tends to be a fresh young wine intended for immediate consumption. In France, bottles plucked from roadside stands, service stations and highway convenience stores are often multi-vintage (or really “nonvintage”) and fairly anonymous; examples I have tried range from truly awful to not too bad.

Anyway, today we look at three “nonvintage” products that happen to be remarkably diverse.
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The Calamares Vinho Verde nv, Portugal, offers a bright gold color and mild, almost subliminal effervescence. The blend of grapes is 40 percent arinto, 30 percent trajadura (also known as treixadura) and 30 percent loureiro. Enticingly fresh and clean, the wine delivers notes of roasted lemon and lemon balm, quince and ginger, green apple and lime peel in a saline, limestone-inflected setting; while it’s a wine of the moment, this Calamares is not ethereal, instead possessing gratifying body with an almost talc-like finish touched with candied grapefruit. Acidity is flagrantly crisp and flint-like. Nine percent alcohol. Drink up. Very Good+. About $7, and do I have to tell you to buy it by the case to drink this Summer?

Imported by Vision Wine and Spirits, Secaucus, N.J. A sample for review.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ The Gaston Chiquet “Tradition” Brut, nv, Champagne, France, is one of our favorite Champagnes, and I was surprised to see that I have never written about it on this blog. It’s a blend of 40 percent pinot meunier grapes, 35 percent chardonnay and 25 percent chardonnay, all from Grand Cru and Premier Cru vineyards. The base wine of the present manifestation is from 2010, with the addition of eight percent each from 2009 and 2008. The color is medium straw-gold; the all-important bubbles are myriad, prolific and dynamic. My purpose in purchasing this Champagne was to balance a scallop dish rich in butter and cream, and the clean, incisive acidity of the Gaston Chiquet “Tradition” Brut and its scintillating limestone minerality did just that. (Plus, you know, it’s Champagne.) The bouquet offers notes of lemon, seashell, lightly buttered cinnamon toast and honeysuckle, all quite subdued, and threads of cloves and crystallized ginger; it’s fairly full in the mouth, but not heavy or obvious, leaning more toward a well-knit and elegant character enlivened by crispness and energetic effervescence. 12.5 percent alcohol. Excellent. I paid about $60.

A Terry Theise Estate Selection, imported by Michael Skurnik Wines, Syosset, N.Y.
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Now comes the wine that inspired this post, the Steven Kent Winery “Evening Vinesong” Grenache nv, Livermore Valley. Produced in a minute quantity and available only to the winery’s Collector’s Circle, a bottle came into my hands via a generous benefactor. The wine is 100 percent grenache — previous editions were a blend — with 60 percent of the grapes grown in 2010 and 40 percent in 2011. Depending on the “year,” the wine ages 24 to 36 months in second-use and neutral French and American oak barrels. The production was 139 cases. The members of the Collector’s Circle who snatch a few bottles or a case of Evening Vinesong Grenache are lucky indeed; this is a beautiful and pure expression of the grenache grape, fruity, spicy, a little raspy and briery. The color is medium ruby-garnet; aromas of red and black currants and cherries are highlighted by pert mulberry and winsome notes of anise, lavender, brambles and dried rosemary (with some of that herb’s pithy, piney quality). In the mouth, the wine is sapid and savory, deftly balanced and integrated; oak is a whisper here, and so is a hint of loam, both forming a background to the wine’s lithe suppleness and elegance. Red and blue fruit flavors are permeated by sandings of cloves and allspice, the whole enterprise ending with a fresh, wild note. I gave LL a glass of this when she came home from work one night; she took one sniff and one sip and said, “Wow, that’s wonderful!” There’s your review. Excellent. For information call (925) 243-6440 or visit stevenkent.com

For these brief notes on 12 wines appropriate for accompanying pizzas and burgers, we look, first, for reasonable prices and, second, for robust, full-bodied wines with lots of flavors and good acid structures. Prices range from $12 to $25. I avoided the obvious candidates like cabernet sauvignon and zinfandel, except perhaps as part of a blend, mainly to give a chance to other equally worthy grape varieties. And speaking of variety, we touch down today in Tuscany and southeastern Italy, in France’s Rhone Valley, in Chile and Spain and Portugal, and a couple areas of California. As usual in these Weekend Wine Notes, I do not include much in the way of technical information, except for grapes, or historical and geographical data. The intent is to pique your interest and whet your palate quickly. Actually, I just realized what a great case of mixed red wines this group would make as a gift, to yourself or someone else, to consume through this Summer and into Fall. Enjoy!

These wines were samples for review.

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Vino dei Fratelli Montepulciano d’Abruzzo 2011, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, Italy. 12.5% alc. 100% montepulciano grapes. Dark ruby color with a violet rim; young, intense, grapey; raspberries, plums, mulberries, hint of spice and brambles; goes down smoothly and easily but quite tasty; bright acidity with light tannins for structure. A decent quaffer with pizza or spaghetti and meatballs. Very Good. About $12, for buying by the case.
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Le Veli Passamante 2012, Salice Salentino, Italy. 13.5% alc. 100% negroamaro grapes. Dark ruby-purple color; black and red cherries and raspberries with a wild note of mulberry, hints of cloves and sandalwood; quenching acidity keeps you coming back for another sip, while barely perceivable tannins keep the wine upright; dry but delicious with deep black and red fruit flavors, fleshed out with spice and a hint of briers and graphite. A terrific pizza quaffer, now through 2015. Very Good+. About $12, a Can’t Miss bargain.
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Adobe Red 2011, Paso Robles, San Luis Obispo County. 13.7% alc. From the Clayhouse division of Middleton Family Wines. Zinfandel 23%, petite sirah 22%, cabernet sauvignon 21%, malbec 17%, petit verdot 10%, tempranillo 4%, syrah 3%. Dark ruby color; black cherries, plums, blueberries, undercurrents of briers, brambles and graphite; rollicking spicy element and bright acidity; very dry, moderate tannins, even-tempered and fun to drink. Now through 2015. Very Good+. About $14, representing Real Value.
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Cachette 2012, Cötes du Rhöne. 13.5% alc. 70% grenache, 10% each syrah, carignan and cinsault. Dark ruby color with a magenta tinge; ripe, meaty and fleshy; blackberries, blueberries, plums with a hint of wild berry; notes of leather, lavender and white pepper, loam and graphite; spicy black and blue fruit flavors, a vein of potpourri and bitter chocolate, hints of cedar and dried thyme; very dry, lively, spicy finish. Good job! Would make a respectable house wine for drinking into 2016. Very Good+. About $15.
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Coltibuono “RS” 2011, Chianti Classico, Italy. 14% alc. 100% sangiovese. Medium ruby color; potpourri and pomander; oolong tea; red and black currants and plums; amenable and amiable but does not lack an acidic backbone and deftly shaped slightly leathery tannins with a touch of dried porcini about them; very dry spice-and-mineral-laced finish. Now through 2015 or ’16. Particularly appropriate with sausage pizza. Very Good+. About $15.
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Prazo de Roriz 2010, Douro, Portugal. 13.5% alc. Tinta barroca 37%, “old vines” 18%, touriga nacional 16%, touriga franca 15%, tinta amarela 7%, tinta cao 7%. Dark ruby color; bay leaf, sage and cedar; a lift of spiced and slightly roasted currants, plums and raspberries with a wild, exotic note; background of graphite and bitter chocolate; serious structure, very dry with relentless yet soft and chewy tannins and a foundation of polished wood and granitic minerality; but delicious with a blend of fresh and dried raspberries and plums with a hint of fruitcake. You might want to forgo a burger for a medium rare ribeye steak in this case. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $16, Great Quality for the Price.
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Viña Maquis Carménère 2011, Colchagua Valley, Chile. 13.5% alc. 100% carménère. Dark ruby-purple color with violet tones; ripe and fleshy, spiced and macerated black currants, raspberries and plums; briers and brambles, graphite, notes of lavender, bay leaf, thyme and black olive; very dry in the bitter chocolate, walnut-shell, dried porcini range of polished tannic density; arrow-straight acidity cuts a swath; black fruit flavors open with hints of exotic spice. Lots going on here; you’ll want that burger with bacon, grilled onions and jalapeño. Now through 2016 to ’17. Very Good+. About $19.
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Bonny Doon Clos de Gilroy Grenache 2013, Monterey County. 14% alc. 77% grenache, 18% syrah, 5% mourvèdre. Dark ruby-magenta color; grapey, plummy, notes of black currants and raspberries; cloves and pomegranate, bright acidity, undertone of loam and graphite but mainly tasty and delightful. Now through 2016. Very Good+. About $20.
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Garzon Tannat 2012, Uruguay. 13.8% alc. Dark ruby; robust and rustic, quite lively and spicy; deep and intense blackberry and currant scents and flavors, a bit roasted and fleshy; loam and mocha, a crisp pencil line of lavender and graphite minerality; gritty tannins make it dense and chewy; dry fairly austere finish. You’ll want that burger nicely charred, with a side of brimstone frites. Now through 2016. Very Good+. About $20.
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Vizcarra Senda del Oro 2012, Ribero del Duero, Spain. NA% alc. 100% tempranillo. Intensely dark ruby-purple; plums and mulberries, dried red currants, hints of iodine and iron; the whole shelf of exotic dried spices; potpourri and lavender; very tasty, deep flavors of black and blue fruit, with an acid backbone and mild tannins. Straightforward and hard-working. Now through 2016. Very Good+. About $20.
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Michael David Bechthold Vineyard Ancient Vine Cinsault 2011, Lodi. 13.5% alc. How “ancient”? These vines were planted in 1885; it’s the oldest producing vineyard in Lodi. 100% cinsault. Dark cherry color; cloves and sandalwood, red and black cherries and currants, hints of fruitcake, pomander and loamy graphite, but clean, bright and appealing; lithe and supple texture, black and red fruit flavors with touches of dried fruit and flowers, lively acidity and moderately dense tannins with a faint undertone of granitic minerality. As tasty as it sounds with a slight serious edge. Now through 2016 to ’18. Excellent. About $24.
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Vina Valoria Crianza 2010, Rioja, Spain. 70% tempranillo, 20% graciano, 10% mazuelo. Dark ruby color; a combination of fresh and dried fruit, plums, lavender, hints of sandalwood and coriander, touch of bay and black tea; leather, mulberries; slightly dusty graphite-flecked tannins with elements of walnut shell and dried porcini add depth and some austerity to the finish. Delicious, well-made, some seriousness to the structure. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $25.
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Actually, it’s unseasonably chilly today in my neck o’ the woods, but that doesn’t stop me from drinking rosé wines and posting about them. Here we touch the South of France, Spain’s Rioja region and two areas of California for pale wines that are light-hearted yet versatile, quaffable yet good with all manner of fare, especially if you’re on a picnic or sitting on the porch or patio. These are quick notices, not intended to bother your pretty little heads about technical, historic or geographical data but desiring to picque your interest and whet the ol’ palate. Enjoy! These wines were samples for review.
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Marc Roman Rosé 2013, Vin de France; the postal code on the bottle indicates Caunes-Minervois, northeast of Carcassonne. 12.5% alc. 100% syrah. Pale pink-salmon color; ripe and fleshy, strawberries and raspberries, fairly spicy; notes of potpourri and orange rind; quite dry, with snappy acidity and a hint at a stony structure. I like this version of 2013 a bit better than the 2012. Very Good. About $11, a Fine Value.
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Pedroncelli Signature Selection Dry Rosé of Zinfandel 2013, Dry Creek Valley, Sonoma County. 13.2% alc. Bright rosy-pink color with a magenta tinge; robust for a rose, very spicy and floral, scents and flavors of red currants, raspberries and red cherries; hints of limestone and flint, enlivened by vibrant acidity; medium body woven of delicate supple strands; tasty, thirst-quenching; lots of personality and appeal. Excellent. About $12, a Great Bargain.
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El Coto Rosado 2013, Rioja, Spain. 13% alc. A 50/50 blend of tempranillo and garnacha. Medium salmon-copper hue; rose and violets, lightly macerated strawberries and raspberries with a touch of tea and orange zest; hint of dried thyme; clean, fresh, dry; good acidity though a moderately lush texture; could you a bit more tautness, still quite enjoyable and better than I remember. Very Good. About $13.
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Paul Jaboulet Aîné Parallèle 45 Rosé 2013, Côtes du Rhône. 13% alc. Grenache 50%, cinsault 40%, syrah 10%. Pale salmon-copper color; tender and robust, lithe, taut and tart; nervy, attractive; raspberries and red currants, blood orange, touch of what Keats calls “the warm South” in its dried herb, sunny, slightly saline nature; all qualities strung on a line of limestone and flint buoyed by brisk acidity. Very tasty. Excellent. About $15.
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M. Chapoutier Belleruche Rosé 2013, Côtes du Rhône. 13% alc. Unspecified blend of grenache, syrah and cinsault. Slightly ruddy onion skin hue; lively and engaging; cloves, spiced tea, orange zest; ripe and dried red currants, raspberries, hint of cherry; rose petal and lilac; good body, even a bit lush yet light on its feet and fleet with vibrant acidity; very clean and refreshing. Excellent. About $15.
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Bonny Doon Vin Gris de Cigare 2013, Central Coast. 13% alc. Grenache 55%, mourvèdre 23.5% roussanne 10%, cinsault 7% carignane 2.5%, grenache blanc 2%. Very pale pink color; beguiling aromas and flavors of strawberries, raspberries and red currants with a faint flush of blood orange and violets; a transparent filigree of limestone lends a crisp yet talc-like aura to the structure while tense acidity keeps it lively and appealing. Beautifully made. Excellent. About $18.
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Usually the “Weekend Wine Notes” offers more than a pair of wines, but I thought that this would be a good weekend to get you started on rosé wines, though I’m in favor of drinking rosés all year round. One from France’s Loire Valley and one from Cigales, a not-so-well-known region in north-central Spain; made from different grape varieties, slightly different in style, both exceedingly charming and satisfying. I won’t provide much in the way of technical, historical, climatic or personnel-type matter; the purpose of the “Weekend Wine Notes” is to titillate your taste-buds and pique your interest quickly. Both of these wines were samples for review; both are imported by Frederick Wildman and Sons, New York. Enjoy!
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Finca Museum Vinea Rosado 2013, Cigales, Spain. 12.5% alc. 100% tempranillo grapes, known in the area as tinta del pais. Lovely salmon-copper color; notes of fresh watermelon, raspberries, peaches and pink grapefruit; a few moments in the glass bring in hints of roses, lilacs and blood oranges; very dry, stony, moderately spicy and herbal — think cloves and dried thyme — with a citrus undertone and a real cut of bright acidity; fairly lean, limestone-inflected texture. Now into Spring 2015. Excellent. About $24.
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Pascal Jolivet Sancerre Rosé 2013, Loire Valley, France. 12.5% alc. 100% pinot noir grapes. Slightly ruddy copper-peach color; hints of ripe peaches, red currants and blood oranges, touched with peach skin, pomander and pomegranate; this rosé is a bit fleshier, a bit more florid, supple and strawberryish than the preceding model, but is just as dry, as crisply acidic, even a touch austere from mid-palate through the spice and stone influenced finish. Now through the end of 2014. Excellent. About $27.
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