France


In referring to the French, the term “arrogant frog” is redundant, n’est-ce pas? Ha ha, just a little joke to introduce the Wine of the Day, the Arrogant Frog Rosé 2016, Pay d’Oc (nicknamed “Lily Pad Pink”), made from 100 percent syrah grapes for the Côté Mas label of Domaine Paul Mas. It’s interesting how grapes, like syrah and mourvèdre, that tend to produce big-hearted, two-fisted red wines, can also, in rosé mode, be fashioned into beverages of the utmost delicacy and subtlety. This one offers a lovely pale copper-pink hue and nuanced aromas of strawberries and raspberries with a hint of melon and notes of rose petals and floral-herbal meadowy elements. On the palate, a bit of peach comes into play, but this is mainly about ineffable red fruits and berries enlivened by brisk acidity and a touch of limestone minerality that comes to dominate the finish. Very refreshing and appealing and perfect for picnics and other outdoor adventures. Very Good+. About $10, a Verifiable Bargain.

Imported by Esprit du Vin, Boca Raton, Fla. A sample for review.

Doubtless white Burgundies of more profound depth and dimension are produced in the great appellations of Meursault, Puligny-Montrachet and Chassagne-Montrachet in the Côte de Beaune, but you would be hard-pressed to find one that offers a more beautiful expression of the chardonnay grape than the Domaine Marc Roy “Les Champs Perdrix” Marsannay 2015. The interesting point here is that Marsannay is the northernmost of Burgundy’s appellations, lying only 6 to 8 kilometers southwest of the city of Dijon. This is primarily red wine — that is to say, pinot noir — territory, as is true of the Côte de Nuits down past the city of Beaune. Chardonnay is a distinct minority in Marsannay — interestingly, pinot blanc is allowed — which is also the only appellation in Burgundy with its own designation for rosé. Domaine Marc Roy owns only four hectares of vines, just under 10 acres, which is minuscule even by Burgundian standards. Most of these are in Gevrey-Chambertin — no Grand Cru or Premier Cru vines — with a slim portion for the chardonnay in Marsannay; the estate is headquartered in Gevrey. Winemaker is fourth generation Alexandrine Roy. Grapes are hand-harvested; the wines ferment by natural yeasts and are given a very conservative oak regimen, this “Champs Perdrix” seeing only 10 percent new oak. The chardonnay vines are 40 years old.

The color is pale gold; at first, the wine delivers pure lemon in every respect, gradually adding an infusion of lime peel and heather, a hint of grapefruit, a touch of seashell; a lovely talc-like texture is riven by bright acidity that adds a keynote of crisp liveliness. The wine is quite dry, but juicy with slightly spiced and macerated pineapple and grapefruit flavors that take on a depth of loamy-damp ash earthiness and limestone-flint minerality; a few moments in the glass unfurl ethereal elements of jasmine, lilac and orange rind. 13 percent alcohol. We drank this bottle last night with seared salmon marinated in olive oil, lemon juice and soy sauce and given a coffee rub-urfa-and-maresh crust. The pairing was absolutely right. A beguiling and seductive model of varietal purity and intensity. Drink through 2020 or ’21. Excellent. About $50.

Production was seven barrels, about 175 cases, so mark this one Worth a Search. Purchased recently at Le Dû’s Wines in New York. The label image is one vintage behind. Imported by Michael Skurnik Wines, Syosset, N.Y.

Of the 55,000 acres planted to the gamay grape in Beaujolais, 15,000 — a hair over 27 percent — are dedicated to the Beaujolais-Villages appellation. The idea is that the wines at the peak of the Beaujolais pyramid, the Cru wines louis-jadot-beaujolais-villages-combe-aux-jacques-beaujolais-france-10731842derived from 10 villages allowed to attach their names to the label, are the most exclusive and the smallest production. The vast areas devoted to the regular Beaujolais designation, the pyramid’s broad base, are the most common. Our wine of the day is the proprietary Louis Jadot “Combe aux Jacques” Beaujolais-Villages 2015. A portion of the grapes derive from a vineyard in Régnié, one of the 10 Cru villages; another portion is purchased wine; and the third portion is from purchased grapes, all in the spirit of making a balanced, dependable, enjoyable wine. The color is dark ruby shading to a lighter magenta rim; the bouquet delivers the signature Beaujolais aromas of blackberries, currants and mulberries permeated by touches of loam, cloves and oolong tea. The wine is juicy and refreshing on the palate, satiny in texture, bolstered by bright acidity and heightened by notes of graphite and blueberries, leading to a clean, chiseled, fruit-and-mineral-laced finish. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drink with just about anything through the end of this year. Excellent. About $13, a local purchase, on sale from $16, representing Good Value.

Imported by Kobrand Wine and Spirits, Purchase, N.Y.

I don’t typically recommend rosé wines from two vintages ago. I mean the point of rosé is its freshness and immediate appeal, n’est-ce pas? Some rosé wines, however, are made of slightly sterner stuff than the usual ethereal, instantly accessible, quaffable models that so delight us and can age for a year or two beyond the Summer after harvest. Such is the case with the two rosé wines from the South of France that I mention today. I encountered these examples at a trade tasting at which rosés from 2015 and ’16 were offered, and while most of the ’15s were fading, if not falling apart, this pair drank with splendid panache, zeal and deliciousness. North Berkeley Imports, Berkeley, Calif.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Le Caillou Rosé 2015, Côtes du Rhône, is an unusual blend of 85 percent counoise and 15 percent mourvedre grapes, and I CAILLOU_rose_websay “unusual” because counoise, not so easy to grow and late ripening, typically finds itself in a minority position in red wines of the southern Rhone Valley, if it shows up at all. In this very pale pink-coral hued wine, it provides scintillating acidity that runs through the structure like an electric wire, as well as a lovely hint of red plum, behind notes of strawberry and orange rind. The domaine, by the way, was founded in 1956 but the estate, surrounded by the Chateaunuef-du-Pape appellation, has a long history of grape-growing and winemaking; the vineyards are certified organic and maintained by biodynamic methods. Winemaker is Bruno Gaspard. This is a dry, taut, crisp rosé that delivers a dusty, almost powdery texture supported by lithe, chiseled flint-like minerality; the finish brings in hints of heather, sea-salt and just a ghost of melon. Drink through the end of 2017. Excellent. About $25.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
The history at Chateau Mattes-Sabran goes back a thousand years in Languedoc-Roussillon. The estate was once the seat MATTES_narbonne_rose-228x300of the Dukes of Narbonne and was well-known in the 12th and 13th centuries as a center for troubadours and the elevation of courtly love. The city itself, as distinct from the commune, dates back to Roman times and was once an important seaport. Winemaking on the estate commenced in 1733. Though made from 100 percent syrah grapes, the Mattes-Sabran Rosé 2015, Pays d’Oc — winemaker was Jean-Luc Brouillat — is unusually delicate and elegant, though possessing tensile strength that feels almost steely; the color is extremely pale watermelon-coral pink, and aromas of slightly spiced and macerated red currants and raspberries testify to its origin in the syrah grape. An aura of pink grapefruit and blood orange is allied to the wine’s crisp citric acidity, while a few moments in the glass bring out notes of dusty limestone, rose petals and dried thyme. Bring on the rabbit and duck terrine, the cucumber sandwiches, the shrimp salad! Now through the end of 2017. Excellent. About $19.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

What more is there to say after “delightful and charming”? These are wines designed to provide your weekend — or the whole week, for that matter — with pleasure, deliciousness and elegance. We range widely in this post: Greece, Germany, Oregon, California, Long Island, Mendoza and Chablis. All single-variety wines, their grapes include assyrtiko, indigenous to the island of Santinori; pinot gris, not that common in the Rhineland; riesling and sauvignon blanc; gruner veltliner and pinot blanc; semillon and chardonnay. As usual in these Weekend Wine Notes, I largely eschew technical, historical and geographical data for the sake of quick, incisive reviews meant to pique your interest and whet your palate. With one exception, the wines were samples for review. Enjoy! (In moderation, of course.)
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
argyros
Estate Argyros Assyrtiko 2015, Santinori, Greece. 14% alc. This one will make you wish you were sitting in a little cafe looking out at the wine-dark Aegean Sea. It sees 20 percent French oak and was made from 150-year-old ungrafted vines. Very pale straw hue; dusty, dry marsh and seashore grasses and herbs; roasted lemon and faint spiced peach; quite ethereal and summery but displaying bracing acidity, notes of limestone-seashell minerality and an aura of yellow meadow flowers. Very Good+. About $25.
Athenee Importers and Distributors, Hempstead, N.Y.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
binz
Weingut Binz Nackenheimer Pinot Gris Kabinett 2015, Rheinhessen, Germany. 12% alc. Bright straw-gold color; jasmine and camellia, preserved lemon and lemon balm, lime peel and pear skin; a hint of mango-like tropical character; crisp and tart, taut with vibrant acidity, very dry yet ripe and juicy on the palate; long, lean, lithe finish. Truly delightful and lots of personality. Excellent. About $14, marking Great Value.
Winesellers Ltd, Niles, Illinois.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
brooks riesling
Brooks Riesling 2015, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 12.5% alc. Pale straw-gold; a direct hit of petrol and rubber eraser, followed by notes of heather and meadow, peach and lychee, with burgeoning hints of jasmine and quince and, after a few moments, ginger beer; limestone minerality offers a tremendous presence for a sense of dimension, without diminishing such fine details as bay leaf and nuances of mango and guava; the whole enterprise feels etched with bright, dry acidity. Just great. Excellent. About $20, representing Wonderful Value.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2016SauvBlanc
Freemark Abbey Sauvignon Blanc 2016, Napa Valley. 13.4% alc. Very pale straw-gold color; notes of lime peel, grapefruit, lemongrass and spiced pear, highlighted by hints of pea-shoots, hay and heather and undertones of sunny, leafy figs; really lively, vibrant, super drinkable, yet spare, dry, lithe, nothing flamboyant or over-done; a finish chiseled from limestone and flint but wreathed in lilac. Excellent. About $24.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Illahe Estate Gruner Veltliner 2016, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 13.5% alc. 650 cases. Very pale straw-gold; classic ILLAHEHEADER_famowned notes of hay, lilac and pine, with roasted lemons and yellow plums, a hint of lime peel and peach; very crisp, lively and engaging, with clean acidity and crystalline minerality cutting through a juicy, talc-like texture; terrific personality and appeal. Excellent. About $17.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2013ReservePinotBlanc300x300 (1)
Lieb Cellars Reserve Pinot Blanc 2015, North Fork of Long Island. 11.9% alc. And this one will make you wish you were sitting on a terrace in the Hamptons, gazing out at the cerulean Atlantic. Very very pale, almost invisible in the glass; notably clean, fresh and spare, quite crisp and vibrant, with delicate strains of peach and spiced pear, rose petals and candied lime peel and a tremendous volume of limestone minerality; slightly herbal and resinous finish. Lovely character. Excellent. About $22.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Una Seleccion de Ricardo Santos Semillon 2016, Mendoza, Argentina. 13.5% alc. Medium green-gold hue; sunny, leafy figs Santos_SM_NV_labeland guava, apple skin and lightly baked pear; a haze of smoke and jasmine; quite clean, spare and elegant, with a beguiling texture that balances moderate lushness of fruit with zinging acidity and flint-graphite minerality, though that aspect emerges on the finish. Wholly delightful and pleasingly complex for the price. Excellent. About $16, marking Good Value.
Global Vineyards, Berkeley, Calif.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________
chablis
Christian Simon Petit Chablis 2014, Chablis, France. 12% alc. Drinking beautifully at about two and a half years old. Pale straw-gold; shimmers with steel and limestone and a snap of gunflint, lustrous with lightly spiced lemon and apple; a texture both dense and powdery, lithe and supple; warms to subtle floral notes; lovely shape and resonance. Excellent. About $22, a local purchase.
Matinicus Wines, Beverley Hills, Fla.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

minuty
Here’s a splendid classic dry rosé from Côtes de Provence in the South of France. A blend of grenache, cinsault and syrah, M de Minuty Rosé 2016 displays a very (very) pale hue that’s like the faintest coral-pink of a baby’s fingernail; ethereal notes of raspberries and rhubarb, with a hint of peach, are spare and delicate, though the wine’s freshness and elegance are buoyed by a taut spine of acidity and a foundation of chiseled, crystalline limestone. Despite its initial ephemeral impression, this rosé offers surprising heft on the palate, along with the herbal earthiness of dried Mediterranean herbs (“garrigue”); a few minutes in the glass bring in touches of lilac and talc, orange rind and white pepper. 13 percent alcohol. A superior rosé, one of the best I have encountered this year. Excellent. About $19.

Imported by Treasury Wine Estates. A sample for review.

cremant
When I posted a picture of the Domaine Allimant-Laugner Crémant d’Alsace Brut Rosé on Facebook recently, someone responded, “I could drink this stuff all day long!” I agree. We’re big fans of Crémant d’Alsace at our house and especially the rosés. This one is 100 percent pinot noir, aged 11 months in the bottle before release. The color is very pale copper-salmon, animated by a lively stream of tiny glinting bubbles; scents and flavors of raspberries and red currants are woven with bracing notes of lime peel and grapefruit rind, heather and toasted hazelnuts, all bolstered by chiming acidity and a scintillating tide of limestone minerality. Above all, this dry crisp rosé sparkler displays tremendous verve and personality, as fresh as Spring on the palate. 12.5 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $21, representing Great Value.

Vigneron Imports, Oakland, Calif. A sample for review.

This survey of 12 rosé wines began as a Weekend Wine Notes post, but here it is, Wednesday, hardy the weekend at all, so I’m keeping the usual Weekend Wine Notes format but dropping that designation. We touch many styles of rosé wine amid this roster as well as many far-flung geographical regions. The grapes involved are also of broad variety, including merlot, pinot noir, tempranillo, grenache, syrah and even cabernet sauvignon and cabernet franc. While a few of these rosés could tolerate aging beyond this calendar year, all are really intended for immediate appeal and consumption, whether your choice of venue is the porch, the patio, by poolside or on a picnic or just standing around the kitchen while someone prepares a light Spring or Summer meal. Prices range from about $10 to $28, so nothing outlandlish. The point is to enjoy, while consuming in moderation, of course. These wines were samples for review.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Ang_rose_2016_web
Angeline Rosé of Pinot Noir 2016, California. 12.5% alc. A lovely pink-melon-coral hue; notes of slightly candied strawberry and raspberry with a hint of pomegranate; a kind of chalk-warm, dusty roof-tiles minerality; just a touch of dried herbs. Simple, direct and tasty; a crowd-pleaser for sure. Very Good. About $13.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Les+vignes+de+Bila-Haut+Rosé+2015+HB+WINE
Domaine Bila-Haut Les Vignes Rosé 2016, Pays d’Oc. 13% alc. 78% grenache, 14% cinsault, 8% syrah. Lovely pale pink hue with a slight coral cast; very delicate notes of strawberry and blood orange, cloves and seashell; undertones of red currants, meadow flowers and heather, buoyed on a lithe crisp texture that’s silky smooth and a chiseled foundation of chalk and flint; the finish brings in a touch of peach. One could happily drink this throughout the Summer. Excellent. About $15, marking Great Value.
Sera Wine Imports, New York.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
bridge-lane-rose-670x1876
Bridge Lane Rosé 2016, New York State. A label from Long Island’s Lieb Cellars. 11.9% alc. 49% cabernet franc, 29% merlot, 16% malbec, 4% pinot noir, 2% petit verdot. Very pale onion skin hue; quite dry and spare, with nuances of strawberry and melon, peach and pink grapefruit; crisp acidity keeps it lively and appealing, over an undercurrent of clean limestone minerality. Very Good. About $18. Also available in 3-liter boxes and 20-liter kegs, so party on, rascals.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
campuget
Chateau de Campuget Tradition Rosé 2016, Costières de Nîmes. 13% alc. 70% syrah, 30% grenache. Very pale copper-onion skin hue; delicately touched with red currants and raspberries, a hint of orange zest and rose petals; quite dry but pleasingly ripe, slightly stony, like warm roof tiles, brisk acidity for crispness and animation, grapefruit and limestone finish. Very Good+. A Steal at about $10.
Imported by Dreyfus & Ashby, New York.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
grgich rose
Grgich Hills Estate Rosé 2016, Napa Valley. 13.1% alc. The first rosé from this venerable winery. 45% merlot, 31% cabernet sauvignon, 9% cabernet franc, 6% petit verdot, to which Bordeaux grape varieties are blended 8% zinfandel and 1% gewurztraminer. A riveting deep salmon-magenta hue; strawberry, tomato skin, rose petals and raspberry leaf; spicy and savory, with lip-smacking crystalline acidity and an intriguing warm brick-damp dust sense of minerality; blood orange, Earl Gray tea and heather dominate from mid-palate through the finish. A terrific and highly individual initial effort. Excellent. About $25.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
illahe rose
Illahe Vineyards Tempranillo Rosé 2016, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 12% alc. 500 cases. Very very pale onion skin hue; very clean and dry, crisp and spare; delicate, indeed, ephemeral notes of strawberry and raspberry, something citrus, like orange rind and lime peel; notes of pomegranate and rhubarb; quite sleek and subtle, propelled by crisp acidity and a chiseled limestone-flint edge. Very Good+. About $17.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
P0004970_Maculan_Costadolio_Rosato
Maculan Costadolio 2016, Breganza Rosato. 12.5% alc. 100% merlot. Production was 1,000 cases. Pale coral-onion skin hue; very spare and delicate, animated by spanking-clean acidity; hints of dried red raspberries and currants, with a note of melon and dried herbs; a little brushy and heather-ish; crisp limestone and flint minerality, slightly saline finish. Super attractive without being pushy. Very Good+. About $15.
A Leonardo LoCascio Selection for Winebow Inc., New York
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
mr_16_rrv_rose_frontlabel
Martin Ray Winery Rosé of Pinot Noir 2016, Russian River Valley. 13.2% alc. Very pale copper-salmon color; strawberry, raspberry and orange rind; a brushing of dried thyme, a light touch of dust and graphite; ripe and tasty but spare and reticent; attractive lithe supple texture. Very Good+. About $25.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Stewart Cellars Rosé 2016, Sonoma Mountain. 13.5% alc. 100% pinot noir. Very pale watermelon pink; really delicate and ethereal notes of Stewart_Logo (1)raspberry, rose petal, pink grapefruit and blood orange; undertones of watermelon, cloves and Earl Gray tea; quite dry, spare yet, paradoxically and delightfully, lush on the palate, animated by crisp acidity and dusty seashell minerality; elegant, charming, beautifully structured. A superior rosé. Excellent. About $28.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Summer-in-Bottle-Rose-2016_9094
Wölffer Estate Summer in a Bottle Rosé Table Wine 2016, Long Island, N.Y. 12.2% alc. A unique blend of 54% merlot, 24% chardonnay, 11% cabernet franc, 6% gewürztraminer, 4% riesling and 1% vignoles. Onion skin hue with a light copper tinge; sprightly, spicy and slightly peppery, with ineffable layers of smoke, melon, raspberry and grapefruit; super fresh and refreshing, with heft and body that flow blithely on the palate. Delicious. Excellent. About $24.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
tongue dancer rose'
Tongue Dancer Wines Rosé of Pinot Noir 2016, Putnam Vineyard, Sonoma Coast. 14.5% alc. Production was 90 cases. Bright copper-coral color; an unusually savory and fleshy rose, lithe and supple on the palate, with scents and flavors of strawberries and raspberries, melon and cloves, pomegranate and wild thyme; a filigreed background of limestone and flint minerality and bracing salinity. A superior rosé. Excellent. About $25.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
angel
Caves d’Esclans Whispering Angel 2016,
Côtes de Provence. 13% alc. Grenache, rolle (vermentino) and cinsault. Whispering, indeed, from its very pale onion skin color, to its delicate hints of orange rind, strawberries and cloves, to its dry, spare, elegant texture: a rose of nods and nuances, except that all aspects are bound and energized by taut, vivid acidity and a limestone structure of lacy transparency; flows across the palate like ethereal peach nectar. Excellent. About $22.
Imported by Shaw-Ross International, Miramar, Fla.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Schlossberg vineyard in Alsace, designated Grand Cru, is a steep, terraced property on granitic soil farmed by the Blanck family on blancksustainable standards. The Paul Blanck Schlossberg Riesling Grand Cru 2012, Alsace, was fermented by natural yeasts in stainless steel and rested for a year in large wooden foudres, followed by two or three years in bottle before release. Have mercy, what a lovely wine! The color is pure medium gold; seamlessly woven aromas of quince and ginger, peach and lychee, green tea and lemongrass open to notes of lightly spiced pineapple and grapefruit and hints of jasmine and honeysuckle. Crystalline acidity chimes a course through a texture that’s part swooningly ripe, part school-teacher astringent, for an effect that’s vibrantly balanced and exciting; flavors of roasted lemon and lemon balm are spicy and savory, dry and refreshing, bolstered by a burgeoning coastline of saline limestone and flint minerality and a finish that trades in lime peel and a note of grapefruit rind bitterness. For a riesling of such depth and complexity, it’s remarkably clean, bright and light on its feet. 13 percent alcohol. Now through 2022 to ’25, giving the wine a chance to mellow and burnish. Excellent. About $34.

Imported by Skurnik Wines, New York. The label image is woefully laggard but is all that’s available. A sample for review.

My introduction to wine mainly occurred through reading books about wine and wine production, primarily centered of France’s storied Bordeaux region. That’s where the interest lay in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Learning about the legendary Bordeaux vintages of the past — 1900, 1928 and ’29, 1945 and ’47, 1959 and ’61 — certainly added to my knowledge about wine and whetted my appetite for experience, but the chances of actually encountering such wines, of course, was nil. Bordeaux doesn’t dominate the conversation as it once did, however, because the past few decades have seen a tremendous wave of diversity and change in the world’s wine industry, though the top properties in Bordeaux’s Right and Left Banks still demand high prices and receive the attention of the press and the auction houses. Very few people, though, will pay, say, $800 to $1,500 for a single bottle of wine, or even $200 to $500. The good news is that the region is filled with hundreds if not thousands of small estates that command not a lot of attention but are completely worthy of being investigated for their high quality and comparatively low prices. The wines under review today derive from properties located in what some would consider Bordeaux’s backwaters, appellations that may be familiar locally but scarcely get imported to these shores. These estates also exist at the forefront of contemporary thinking about Bordeaux wines. Most of these estates run on organic or biodynamic principles; most are family-owned and operated and pride themselves on their artisanal approach. They provided me — four whites and five reds — with a great deal of pleasure, and I urge My Readers to search them out.

These wines were samples for review.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
25597-250x600-bouteille-chateau-du-champ-des-treilles-vin-passion-blanc--sainte-foy-bordeaux
This 24-acre estate, the property of Corinne and Jean-Michel Comme, is operated strictly on biodynamic principles. Only native yeasts are used, and the wine sees no oak, aging four months on the lees in vats. Chateau du Champs des Treilles “Vin Passion” 2015, Sainte-Foy-Bordeaux, is a blend of one-third each sauvignon blanc, semillon and muscadelle. The effect is of impeccable clarity and purity, beginning with the very pale hue that evinces the merest shade of straw-gold, with a faint green tint; the primary notes are lime peel and tangerine, talc and lilac, with hints of leafy fig and peach; it’s very dry yet juicy in its citrus and stone-fruit flavors, lightly dusted with cloves and dried thyme and expanding into shelves of limestone and flint minerality. 13 percent alcohol. Drink through 2018. Very Good+. About $15.
Savio Soares Selections, Brooklyn, N.Y.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
chateau-marjosse-blanc-2013-G2
Pierre Lurton owns two of the most august and authoritative properties in Bordeaux, Chateau Cheval Blanc in Saint-Emilion and Chateau d’Yquem in Sauternes. He is also proprietor of this 146-acre estate in Entre-Deux-Mers, which dedicates 121 acres to red grapes and 25 to white. Chateau Marjosse 2014, Entre-Deux-Mers, is a blend of 50 percent sauvignon blanc, 30 percent semillon, 15 percent sauvignon gris and 5 percent muscadelle, fermented in cement and aged two months in French oak. The color is medium gold-yellow; this is all yellow fruit and flowers, like peaches and golden plums, honeysuckle and jasmine, with, in the background, a note of guava; as to minerality, it’s like drinking liquid quartz in its dryness, its scintillating glitter and its vibrant acidity. Alcohol content N/A. It’s quite attractive, but feels just a tad musky and funky, so drink by the end of 2017. Very Good+. About $16.
Peloton Imports, Naoa, Calif; Duclot La Vinicole, New York.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
les charmes
Chateau Les Charmes-Godard is owned by the Thienpont family, which oversees a startlingly comprehensive roster of fine properties, including Vieux-Chateau-Certan and Le Pin in Pomerol. The 16-acre Les Charmes-Godard is far more humble than those prestigious estates but is operated on meticulous standards. Of the area under vines, only 2.5 acres is devoted to dry white wine. Chateau Les Charmes-Godard 2014, Francs Cotes de Bordeaux. is a blend of 65 percent semillon, 20 percent sauvignon gris and 15 percent muscadelle, fermented in oak and aged eight months, one-third new barrels, one-third one-year old, one-third two years old. This is a pinpoint focused wine that offers a mild medium gold hue and lucid aromas of figs and tangerine, with the pertness of lime peel and the dusty richness of greengage; incisive acidity cuts a swath through a texture that deftly balances talc-like softness with crisp tartness. An indisputable limestone edge emerges from mid-palate back through the spare, chiseled finish. 13 percent alcohol. Terrific winemaking. I suspect that this wine possesses the tensile power and vitality to last beyond its immediate principle of pleasure, so drink through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $20, representing Great Value.
Imported by Monsieur Touton, New York.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Olivier Bernard, owner of the august Domaine de Chevalier in the Graves region, acquired Clos des Lunes with the intention of producing well-made and clos-des-lunes-lune-blanche-bordeaux-2014affordable dry white wines. The paradox is that the 136-acre estate lies in the heart of Sauternes, right next to Chateau d’Yquem, which arguably makes the best sweet wines in the world. (All right, among the best.) Clos des Lunes Lune Blanche 2014, Bordeaux, is an old-vine blend of 70 percent semillon and 30 percent sauvignon blanc, aged six or seven months in vats (70 percent) and oak barrels (30 percent). The wine displays a pale gold hue and offers beguiling aromas of lilac and talc, roasted lemon, with notes of ginger and quince, lemon grass and tangerine; it’s quite dry and spare on the palate, developing a profound element of limestone minerality, but also opening to touches of starfruit, papaya and grapefruit rind for a finish that’s both seductive and a bit austere. 13 percent alcohol. Great winemaking on view here. Drink now through 2019 or ’20. Excellent. About $20, another Great Value.
Imported by Monsieur Touton, New York.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Mauvesin_2012-bd_1_
Chateau Mauvesin Barton is owned by Lilian Barton and Michel Sartorius, owners of Chateaux Leoville Barton and Langoa-Barton, classified growths in St.-Julien The 126-acre estate is run by their children Melanie and Damien. Chateau Mauvesin Barton 2012, Moulis-en-Medoc, is a blend of 48 percent merlot, 35 percent cabernet sauvignon, 14 percent cabernet franc, 3 percent petit verdot, aged 12 months in oak, one-third new barrels, one-third one-year old; one-third from two Leoville-Barton wines. The color is intense dark ruby shading to a transparent mulberry rim; an aura of dust, graphite and cedar encompasses concentrated, rooty and tea-like black currants and cherries. It’s a mouth-filling wine, robust and vibrant, and it pulls up more intensity as the moments pass, revealing a kind of meaty core touched with tapenade, fruit cake and violets. For all that, it manages to be quite tasty. 13 percent alcohol. Now through 2020 to ’22. Excellent, and a Great Value at about $21.
Imported by Frederick Wildman & Sons, New York.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Clos Puy Arnaud La Cuvee Bistrot de Puy Arnaud 2013, Castillon Cotes de Bordeaux, is a blend of 70 percent merlot, 30 percent cabernet bistr13_174x241franc, certified biodynamic. Seeing no oak, the grapes fermented and the wine aged three months in cement vats. A bright medium but transparent ruby hue presages the wine’s notion of freshness and drinkability; hints of red currants and cherries are light and tasty, while the wine unfolds a spicy and slightly fleshy aspect and notes of iodine and graphite, mint and cloves; clean acidity keeps the whole package lively and balanced. 12 percent alcohol. Exactly what you might drink in a bistro or cafe with a roasted chicken, steak frites or rabbit and pork terrine. Very good+. About $25. Charming as it may be, I would like this wine better at $18. Drink up; the ’14 is on the market.
Imported by Duclot La Vinicole, Manhasset, N.Y.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
reignac
I was supposed to receive the 2010 version of this wine, but got the 2008 instead, and I’m glad I did. We don’t often have the chance to try an eight-year-old red wine from Bordeaux, so this was instructive. And I’ll say that people who love the red wines of Bordeaux but don’t want to pay the gasp-inducing prices attached to the Big Names should consider buying Chateau Reignac by the case, for present and future drinking. The 200-acre estate in Entre-Deux-Mers is owned by Yves and Stephanie Vatelot. Thirty percent of the grapes are vinified in new oak barrels after cold maceration in stainless steel vats; 70 percent are vinified in wood and stainless steel. Chateau de Reignac 2008, Bordeaux Superieur, is a blend of 75 percent merlot, 25 percent cabernet sauvignon. The color is very dark and intense black-ruby with the slightest fading at the rim; notes of tobacco leaf, walnut shell and dried rosemary point toward the structural elements in this wine, finding a complement on the palate in dry, tightly focused tannins and sleek graphite-tinged minerality. The texture is lithe, supple and sinewy and supports concentrated, spicy black currant and cherry flavors showing a hint of plum. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2025 to ’28. Excellent. About $31.
Imported by Fruit of the Vines, Inc, Long Island City, N.Y.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Paul Barre, owner of the 17-acre estate Chateau La Grave in Fronsac, was a pioneer of biodynamic practices in Bordeaux, having instituted la gravesuch methods to his vineyard 25 years ago. The word “chateau” carries many implications in the region, and at Chateau La Grave there is no 18th Century mansion; rather; rather, Barre, his wife and son and daughter-in-law live and work in a farmhouse in the midst of the vines. The vineyard is plowed by horse, the grapes are hand-harvested and only native yeasts are employed to start fermentation. Chateau La Grave 2011, Fronsac, is a blend of 66 percent merlot, 26 percent cabernet franc, 8 percent malbec. A very dark ruby robe shades to a bright magenta rim; there’s broad appeal and even charm here, in a wine that displays slightly fleshy, spiced and macerated black currants and raspberries in a dense, almost chewy texture bolstered by moderate tannins and vibrant acidity; it’s peppery and juicy on the palate, and as the moments pass, the wine acquires more substance and heft, through to a somewhat honed, graphite inflected finish. 13 percent alcohol. Now through 2019 to ’21. Excellent. About $32.
Imported by Grand Cru Selections, New York. Image by Christine Havens.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
The vineyards at tiny Clos du Jaugueyron — 7.4 acres divided into 16 separate parcels — are certified organic and biodynamic. The Clos du jaugueyron Jaugueyron 2012, Haut-Medoc, is a blend of 53 percent cabernet sauvignon, 40 percent merlot and 7 percent petit verdot, aged 12 months in French oak, 75 percent older barrels, 25 percent new. The color is dark ruby, with slight fading at the rim; the glass bursts with notes of mint and cedar, iodine and graphite and black fruit steeped in spiced black tea. These elements segue seamlessly onto the palate, where the wine takes on aspects of forest and loam and dry, well-knit tannins, animated by bright acidity. Granitic minerality in the finish feels chiseled and almost transparent. 12.5 percent alcohol. Beautifully fashioned and well-balanced for drinking through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $36
Imported by Selection Massale, Oakland, Calif.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Next Page »