Corvina


It’s chilly and brisk today in what’s called the Mid-South in these here parts, putting me in mind of a hearty but not overdone or blockbusterish red wine. Such a candidate would be the Scaia Paradiso 2013, a Rosso Veronese from Tenuta Sant’Antonio, a noted producer of parrs13_art210Valpolicella and Amarone. The wine is a blend of 50 percent corvina grapes, 20 percent each corvinone and rodinella and 10 percent cabernet sauvignon. The wine undergoes a second fermentation on the skins of dried cabernet grapes for about 10 days, in the ripasso method of Valpolicella, though cabernet is unusual in this respect. The wine aged for a year in 500-liter oak casks, about 132 gallons, compared to 59 gallons for the standard French barrique. This is a gritty, loamy, smoky wine — there are three of the Dwarfs — whose dark but not over-extracted ruby-garnet color testifies to an innate transparency and lightness of being. Aromas of deeply spiced and macerated black and red cherries offer notes of cherry skin and pit, along with a foresty element of briers and brambles; a few moments in the glass bring out hints of mint and blueberry. A nicely chiseled graphite element pervades the texture, serving as backdrop for a barky and rooty quality, like some black tea concocted by monks, and a bit of Damson plum, licorice and violets, all animated by enlivening acidity and a touch of dusty tannins. None of these characteristics are unduly emphatic or dominate, the whole package being a model of balance and integration. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2019 or ’20 with full-flavored pasta dishes, grilled red meat or dry aged cheeses. Excellent. About $18, representing Real Value.

Imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif. A sample for review.

The Zenato estate was founded in 1960 by Sergio and Carla Zenato, just east of Lake Garda, and focused from the beginning on the white trebbiano di Lugana grape. Today, the property makes a variety of wines, including the red Valpolicella Classico and Amarone. The estate is now operated by Sergio and Carla’s daughter Nadia and son Alberto, who have introduced a new wine to the Zenato roster is the Alanera Rosso Veronese, today’s Wine of the Week. Alanera means “black wing.”

So, the Zenato Alanera 2012, Rosso Veronese, is a blend of 55 percent corvina grapes, 25 percent rondinella, 10 percent corvinone and 5 percent each merlot and cabernet sauvignon. That latter percentage of grapes associated more with Bordeaux or California or indeed Tuscany instead of the Veneto is why this wine carries a Rosso Veronese designation rather than Valpolicella; merlot and cabernet sauvignon are not allowed in “official” Valpolicella at any level. Fifty percent of the grapes were dried. The wine aged 12 months in 300 to 500-liter tonneaux and 100 to 150-hectoliter tanks, meaning fairly large to quite large vessels — 100 HLs equal 2,641.7 gallons — and no new oak, these barrels all being two or three years old. The wine is a dark ruby color with a purple tinge at the rim; scents of ripe black currants, blueberries and plums are permeated by notes of licorice, lavender and violets, with a penetrating graphite element, the overall impression being spicy, roasted and a little fleshy. It’s quite dry but succulent, a bit velvety on the palate but buoyed by bright acidity and pert flint-like minerality; and boy is it tasty, with its black fruit flavors touched with fruitcake and oolong tea. Moderate and slightly chewy tannins lend heft from mid-palate back through the clean, chiseled finish. A very manageable 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $20, representing Great Value.

Imported by The Winebow Group, New York. A sample for review.