Cheap Wine


Readers, today’s Wine of the Day — after somewhat of an unintended hiatus — is not a great wine, but it is a great value. The rocks“Rocks!” label comes from Cornerstone Cellars, preeminently a producer of high-toned and powerful Napa Valley cabernet sauvignon wines as well as a second label, Stepping Stone, for a wider range of less expensive products. Rocks! is the bargain tier, offering now a white, a red and a rosé. Let’s look at the Rocks! White Wine 2014, California, a secret blend of chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, viognier and orange muscat. The latter two grapes don’t require a high percentage of physical presence to make an impact, and you feel them in the wine’s aura of honeysuckle, honeydew melon, bee’s-wax, spiced pear and fig and in the element of sweetness that’s fortunately balanced on the palate by a spine of clean bracing acidity. The wine offers notes of freshly mowed hay and lemongrass with fillips of lime peel and kumquat (with that peculiar bitter sharply citrus quality), while the finish is quite dry and accented by a savory and saline hit of cloves, grapefruit and limestone. The alcohol content is 12.5 percent. Drink up. Served quite chilled with fairly spicy Thai food, grilled shrimp or chicken salad. Very Good+. About $15.

A sample for review.

You know how we wine taster-writer-bloggers are, always scurrying around trying to find cool, excellent expressive wines that nobody has ever heard of, so we say recommend as Wine of the Day or whatever some product fashioned from a totally obscure grape by an 2014-Fume_304x773ancient family in an isolated valley in the foothills of an undiscovered mountain range in eastern France where normally grapes aren’t even grown and 100 cases are imported by a company in Minnesota with no national distribution and we can say: “Definitely Worth a Search!” And it costs $85 a bottle. Well, today I’m not doing that. In fact, I’m recommending a wine that is so well-known and widely available and so ubiquitous on restaurant wine lists of a certain order that you may fall down laughing, so boo-hoo-hoo to you. The wine is the Ferrari-Carano Fumé Blanc 2014, Sonoma County, produced in the amount of 85,000 cases and as tasty and reliable a sauvignon blanc as you will encounter on a daily basis. This is thoughtfully made, 60 percent in stainless steel and 40 percent in older French oak barrels, so the wood influence is subtle, almost subliminal, and acts as a shaping rather than a dominating factor. (Winemaker is Sarah Quider.) The color is pale gold; aromas of honeysuckle, lime peel, spiced pear and lemongrass are infused with notes of fig, fennel and dried thyme. The wine is quite lively on the palate, with bracing acidity and a scintillating limestone and flint element, and it asserts its dry yet delicious presence with an effect that’s both authoritative and tender. A lithe and supple texture leads to a finish drenched in grapefruit, mango and attentive salinity. 13.8 percent alcohol. Profound? Multi-dimensional? Revelatory? Of course not. Savory? Appealing? Satisfying? Absolutely. Very Good+. About $14, representing Terrific Value.

A sample for review.


Here’s a nifty red wine to quaff while chowing down on pizza, burgers, spaghetti and meatballs, nachos and other fare that’s terrifically satisfying and not so good for you — but the red wine cancels out the bad parts! Finca Resalso 2014, from Spain’s Ribera del Duero region, composed of 100 percent tempranillo grapes, is the youngest wine to issue from Bodegas Emilio Moro, made from vines five to 15 years old. It ages four months — a few heartbeats in the life of a more substantial wine — in French and American oak. Fresh, clean and ripe, the Finca Resalso 2014 offers a dark ruby-violet hue and gripping aromas of black and red currants and plums, with undertones of blueberry, cloves and lavender over a base of graphite. The wine is moderately full-bodied, tasty with its red and black fruit flavors and nicely firm in its slightly dusty branchy tannins, all elements tied together by bright acidity; a few minutes in the glass bring in notes of black tea and orange zest, all ensconced in a finish that feels lively and a bit feral. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink through 2016 or ’17 and don’t worry your pretty little heads about it. Very Good+. About $15, representing Real Value.

Imported by Moro Brothers Inc., New York. A sample for review.

In days gone by, we legions of wine-writers would lament the fact that nobody but us appreciated rosé wines and how wonderful they are and how versatile. We would deplore the notion that everyone in America associated rosé wines with sweetness — and the worst were sweet — when actually the best rosés are quite dry. That’s not the case now, when rosés have grown immensely popular and many wineries all over the world turn out the things as major or side projects, sometimes very seriously. Rosé wines have improved too, being generally made in clean, fresh, crisp mineral-infused fashion. Don’t worry about rosés, friends, they can take care of themselves. I offer today 10 examples of rosé wines made from a variety of grapes in differing styles, most tending toward pleasure and delight, although a couple invite more thoughtful contemplation. They’re not just for Spring and Summer either; several of these models carry enough heft and character to be consumed throughout the year, though you can’t beat them for picnics and backyard fetes in fine weather. Enjoy! In moderation, of course.

These wines were samples for review.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Domaine Saint-Aix AIX Rosé 2014, Coteaux d’Aix en Provence, France. 12.5% alc. Grenache, cinsault, syrah, counoise. Very pale pink, like the inside of a seashell; ineffable fragrance of dried strawberries and red currants assisted by mild notes of cloves and thyme; brisk acidity blows through it like a sea-breeze on damp limestone; lavender and orange zest in the background, all delicately chiseled and faceted. Excellent. About $19.
Imported by Massanois LLC, Scarsdale, N.Y.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Chateau Notre Dame du Quatourze Rosé 2014, Languedoc, France. 13% alc. Cinsault, grenache, syrah. Salmon-peach color; peach and strawberry, nicely ripe, slightly dusty terra cotta touch; pomegranate with a notes of cloves; limestone and dried herbs. Tasty and attractive. Very Good+. About $NA .
Imported by Val d’Orbieu America, New York.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Chateau de Jonquieres Cuvee Cersius Rosé 2014, Languedoc, France. …% alc. Cinsault, grenache, syrah. A pale pink shimmer; delicate and elegant, fine bones; rose hips and strawberries, notes of raspberries and orange zest; crystalline acidity and gravel-like minerality; quite dry but distinctly though ethereally flavorful. Lovely. Very Good+. About $NA .
Imported by Val d’Orbieu America, New York.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Los Vascos Rosé 2014, Colchagua, Chile. Les Domaines Barons de Rothschild (Lafite) 13.5% alc. 90% cabernet sauvignon, 10% syrah. Light salmon-pink color with a tinge of magenta; a summery burst of pure strawberry and raspberry; warm and spicy, racy acidity; a touch of plums garnished with dusty graphite and a dash of dried thyme; lovely shape and presence. Excellent. About $14, representing Great Value.
Pasternak Wine Imports, Harrison, N.Y.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MacPhail Family Wines Rosé of Pinot Noir 2014, Sonoma Coast. 14.5% alc. 100% pinot noir. 492 cases. Brilliant copper-salmon color; tomato skin and lime leaf, strawberries, raspberries and rose petals, hints of graphite and sea-salt, briers and brambles; a spicy, savory and fairly robust rose that doesn’t neglect delicacy and elegance in the upper register; lively, supple finish drenched with red fruit (hinting at the tropical) and mineral undertones. A superior rose. Exceptional. About $22.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Il Poggione Brancato 2014, Rosato di Toscana, Italy. 12.5% alcohol. 100% sangiovese. Vivid smoky topaz hue; strawberries, raspberries and peaches; a dusty, dusky minerality, like paving stones warmed by the sun; hints of cloves and dried thyme; beautiful balance between bright acidity and a moderately lush texture, but altogether spare and elegant. A gorgeous rosé, very much a presence on the palate. Excellent. About $18.
Imported by Terlato Wines International, Lake Bluff, Ill.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Chateau Ribaute “Senhal d’Aric” Rosé 2014, Corbiéres. 12.5% alc. Carignane, grenache, syrah, mourvèdre. Smoky topaz hue, slightly darker than onion skin; peach and strawberry, with a touch of raspberry in the background; warm and stony, damp roof tiles drying in sunlight — the whole “South of France” thing; ethereal but with a grounding in loam. Nicely layered for a rose. Excellent. About $NA.
Imported by Val d’Orbieu America, New York.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Stemmari Rosé 2014, Sicily. 12% alc. 100% nero d’avola grapes. Entrancing light ruby color with violet undertones; red fruit all round, with prominent strawberry and raspberry followed by notes of cherries and currants and touches of tart pomegranate and pink grapefruit; sunny, leafy, warm and spicy; refreshing and attractive; finish emphasizes brisk acidity and limestone-like crispness (with a hint of orange candied orange peel). Very Good+. About $10, a Real Bargain.
Prestige Wine Imports, New York.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Toad Hollow Vineyards “Eye of the Toad” Dry Rosé of Pinot Noir 2014, Sonoma County. 11.5% alc. 100% pinot noir. Vivid salmon-copper hue; notably fresh, clean and crisp; strawberries and rose petals, notes of pert cranberries and pomegranate; hint of orange rind; flinty texture for under-tones of minerality but lovely satiny flow on the palate. Very Good+. About $12, marking Great Value.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Two Shepherds Grenache Rosé 2014, Sonoma Coast. % alc. 100% grenache. 90 cases. The blissful incarnadine of bright ruby-cherry hue; pure raspberry with a suffusion of cherry-berry, melon ball and sour cherry; marked limestone minerality, very dry yet drenched with tart, slightly candied red fruit flavors; almost tannic yet never less than delightful and ethereal in the high notes and gradually unfolding depth unusual in a rose; finish brings in hints of apple, dried cranberry and thyme. Perfection. Exceptional. About $24.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Boy, the weather certainly has improved down in my neck o’ the woods. The temperature is reaching 75 this afternoon, and the sky is blue and clear as a bell. I see on the weather map that it’s going up into the mid 80s in southern Florida and California. Time, then, to break out a winsome, uncomplicated little white wine to sip while you’re out soaking up rays or relaxing on the porch or patio or perhaps while you’re in the kitchen rustling some dinner together. The wine is The Beach House Sauvignon Blanc 2014, from South Africa’s Western Cape region, and yeah, it’ll remind you of lying around on a beach or make you wish you were basking on one. It’s a blend of 75 percent sauvignon blanc and 15 percent semillon, made all in stainless steel for freshness and crisp immediacy. The color is very pale straw-gold, with a shimmer of light green; penetrating aromas of lemongrass, lime peel, grapefruit and mango are suffused with notes of figs and a kind of sunny-leafy quality. The brisk acidity and scintillating limestone elements start right at entry and continue to bring liveliness to the wine all through its passage of pineapple, peach, roasted lemon and hint of thyme through your happy mouth; an intriguing hint of grapefruit bitterness brings pizazz to the finish. The alcohol content is a nicely manageable 12.5 percent. Drink up and don’t worry your pretty little head about a thing, just nibble on some shrimp or chicken salad, deviled eggs, cucumber sandwiches; you get the idea. Very Good+. About $10, a Terrific Value.

Imported by Pacific Highway Wines & Spirits, Petaluma, Calif. A sample for review.

The idea behind Rotation Wines is to produce drinkable cross-vintage blends and sell them at reasonable prices. No sneakiness enters into the concept. It is acceptable to the TTB — widely recognized abbreviation for Federal agency, the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau — that if a vintage wine carries a general “California” designation, it must contain at least 85 percent of wine from stated vintage, or only 85 percent — see the TTB code: §4.27(a)(2). A vintage wine that displays a specific American Viticultural Area (AVA), like Russian River Valley or Paso Robles, must contain at least 95 wine from the stated vintage. So, the Rotation Red Blend 2012, California, is a blend of 60 percent merlot and 30 percent zinfandel from 2012 and 10 percent ruby cabernet from 2010; the zinfandel was briefly aged in oak barrels. The grapes derived from Napa Valley and “nearby areas.” One does not often see ruby cabernet mentioned as a grape on a label, and indeed its use even as a blending grape in California is diminishing. It’s a cross between carignan and cabernet sauvignon produced at the University of California, Davis, in 1936. And what about the wine under consideration today? The Rotation Red Blend 2012 offers an intense, dark ruby color and fleshy, meaty aromas of spiced and macerated black and red cherries and currants; the spice notes involved lean toward the woodsy side of cloves and sandalwood; there’s also a touch of lavender and graphite. On the palate, the wine is simple and direct, very tasty with black fruit edged with red (both ripe and slightly baked) and bolstered by moderate tannins and lively acidity. Drink through the end of this year or into 2016 with burgers and pizzas, with hearty pasta dishes and fajitas. Very Good. About — and here’s the great part — $9 to $10.

A sample for review.

Because I am late with the Wine of the Week, I offer a pair of products to atone for my procrastination. These are two bargain-priced wines from Bordeaux and are definitely Worth a Search. Each, incidentally, was acquired within the past few years by Russian and Chinese companies. Imported by The Wine Trust, Mattituck, N.Y. These wines were samples for review.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Chateau de Birot overlooks the Garonne River from its hillside in Cadillac Côtes de Bordeaux. Wine has been made on the estate for more than 200 years; the impressive chateau — the Dutch writer Hubrecht Duijker calls it “alluring” — dates from the second half of the 18th Century. Acquired by Eric and Hélène Fournier-Casteja in 1989, the estate was sold in December 2014 to the Chinese hospitality company New Century Tourism Group.

Blanc de Birot 2012, carrying a Bordeaux designation, is a blend of 65 percent sauvignon blanc grapes and 35 percent semillon; it aged 12 months in French oak, 20 percent new barrels. The color is pale gold; speaking of “alluring,” an extraordinary bouquet of lemongrass, pineapple, fig, lime peel and jasmine teases and tantalizes the nose; on the palate, the wine is clean and fresh, tart with lemon and grapefruit flavors and scintillating with bright acidity and crushed gravel/limestone minerality. The whole effect offers gratifying balance between sassy briskness and a soft talc-like texture. 13 percent alcohol. A wine that practically gets down on its knees and begs for a platter of just-shucked oysters, though it also serves handily as aperitif. Drink through 2016. Very Good+. About $13 or $14, a Bargain of the Decade.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
The red wine of this pair is Les Sources de Livran 2009, Medoc, the second label of Chateau Livran, an estate that traces its long history back to 1280, when King Edward I of England granted the right to brother knights Arnaud and Beraud de Got to build a fortress on the land, a few kilometers west of the Gironde estuary. Their more famous brother was Bertrand de Got, who served as Pope Clement V from 1305 to 1314. Nothing of that fortress remains, but the estate itself has produced wine for hundreds of years. In 1889, the property was acquired by the Englishman James L. Denman, and then in the mid-20th Century by Robert Godfren, under whose ownership the estate released what are usually described as “correct” and “adequate” wines. In 2008, however, Chateau Livran was purchased by a Russian investment firm, and if things can be turned around in a couple of harvests, that may have been the case here, because Les Sources de Livran 2009 is a lovely wine, not overly serious or weighty but delicious and satisfying, what the British call a “luncheon claret.”

This ’09 is a 50/50 blend of cabernet sauvignon and merlot, aged 12 months in oak. The color is dark ruby with a touch of garnet at the rim; aromas of dried currants and plums, cloves and sandalwood, violets and potpourri dominate a bouquet that meshes with dusty, woodsy notes, dried herbs and a hint of graphite. Animated by lip-smacking acidity and featuring a firm though not tight tannic grip, the wine is spare but not austere, slightly dusty and powdery in texture and decently furnished with black and blue fruit flavors that peel back touches of dried spices and lavender; in fact, the floral element grows as the moments pass. 13 percent alcohol. Drink this wine through 2016 or into ’17 with game terrines and patés, beef stew or leg of lamb. Very Good+. About $15 to $17, another Great Value.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

We can’t drink great wine all the time. Contrary to what My Readers may think, I certainly don’t. In fact, a diet of perfection would become cloying and wearisome, n’est-ce pas? Well, perhaps not, but let’s assume that most people really just want a decent bottle of wine to accompany a simple meal. Here, then, are two white wines and four reds designed to be to consumed with, say, a tuna sandwich or seafood risotto, on the one hand, or a burger or steak, on the other. Prices range from $12 to $17, with quality fairly evenly portioned along the Very Good to Very Good+ range. Will these wines — especially the reds — lodge in the memory as some of the best wine you’ve tasted? certainly not, but they get the job done, or better, at a reasonable price. If only everything in life turned out that way. Quick reviews here, intended to pique your interest and whet the palate. Enjoy!

These wines were samples for review.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Stepping Stone Rocks! White Wine 2013, North Coast, California. 13.3% alc. (Stepping Stone is the second label of Cornerstone Cellars; Rocks! is, well, the second label of Stepping Stone.) “Mystery” blend of chardonnay, viognier and muscat canelli. Very pale gold color; lilac, lemon-lime and pear, slightly grassy and herbal, hint of lemongrass; quite clean, crisp, fresh and dry, with a kind of gin-like purity and snap; taut, vibrant, lean but a pleasing, cloud-like texture; crystalline acidity and scintillating limestone minerality; slightly earthy finish. Extremely attractive white blend for short-term drinking. Very Good+. About $15, representing Excellent Value.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Tomero Torrontes 2013, Mendoza, Argentina. 13.5% alc. Pale gold color; jasmine and gardenia, spiced pear and lemon balm, lime peel and a touch of grapefruit, a few minutes in the glass bring in whiffs of lavender and lilac, though this is not overwhelmingly floral, all is subtle and nuanced; pert citrus and stone fruit flavors; lovely body, crisp, lithe and lively yet imbued with an almost talc-like texture that slides across the palate like silk; hint of grapefruit bitterness on the finish. A superior torrontes for consuming over the next year. Very Good+. About $17.
Imported by Blends, Plymouth, Calif.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Mandolin Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Central Coast. 13.8% alc. Brilliant dark ruby with a flush of mulberry at the rim; unfolds layers of cedar,
thyme and black olive, black currants and plums, hint of wild berry; notes of iodine and graphite; trace of wood in the slightly leathery tannins, quite dry but juicy with herb-inflected black fruit flavors; sleek and supple texture, lively acidity; spice-and-mineral-packed finish. Now through the end of 2015. Great personality for the price. Very Good+. About $12, an Amazing Bargain.
Image from brainwines.com.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Esprit du Rhône 2013, Côtes du Rhône, France. 13.5% alc. 60% grenache, 30% syrah, 5% carignan, 5% cinsault. 1,000 cases imported. Medium-dark ruby color shading to a transparent rim; aromas of ripe blackberries, blueberries and plum with notes of cloves, briers and leather; fairly dense and robust tannins and bright acidity keep the texture forthright and lively for the sake of tasty, spicy black fruit flavors. Now through 2016. Very Good. About $12.
Imported by Quintessential, Napa, Calif. Image from vivino.com.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Nieto Senetiner Malbec 2012, Mendoza, Argentina. 14% alc. Dark ruby-purple; briery and brambly blackberry and plum fruit deeply imbued with cloves, mocha and licorice; moderate and slightly chewy tannins for structure, an uplift of acidity; tasty black fruit flavors in a rustic, graphite-laden package. Now into 2015. Very Good. About $13.
Imported by Foley Family Wines, Sonoma, Calif.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Tercos Bonarda 2013, Mendoza, Argentina. (From the winery of Ricardo Santos). 13.8% alc. Dark ruby hue, almost opaque; spicy and feral, blackberries and plums with notes of wild cherry, tar, graphite and licorice; heaps of rough-hewn tannins make for a sturdy mouthful of wine, though nothing heavy or ponderous to detract from ripe, delicious blackberry and blueberry flavors; loads of personality. Now through the end of 2015. Very Good. About $14.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


My introduction to Ray Signorello’s Fuse, Edge and Trim line of cabernet-based wines was with the 2010 vintage in 2012. This is a side-project apart from his Signorello Estate. The motive was to produce inexpensive or moderately-priced red wines that performed above their price point. (Here is the post with my reviews of those initial releases.) Today’s Wine of the Week, the Trim Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, carrying a California designation, fulfills Signorello’s goal handily. The wine is a blend of 82 percent cabernet, 15 percent merlot and 3 percent malbec. The color is dark ruby with a hint of magenta at the rim. Aromas of black cherries and red and black currants are highlighted by notes of blueberries, cloves and lavender with undertones of dusty graphite. It’s sleek and supple in the mouth, propelled by vibrant acidity and oak-tinged tannins that do not detract from juicy and spicy black fruit flavors with a touch of dried fruit and flowers about them. The slightly chiseled finish is packed with spice and graphite-tinged minerality. 13.5 percent alcohol. Winemakers are Ray Signorello and Pierre Birebent. Drink now through 2016 to ’18. We had this quite successfully with a homemade pizza that featured roasted eggplant and duck breast. Very Good+. About — ready for this? — $11, a Bargain of the Century.

This wine was a sample for review.


All of today’s wines were imported by Kysela Pere et Fils, founded in 1994 by Fran Kysela and located in Winchester, Va. The company specializes in inexpensive or moderately priced wines from France, Spain, Italy, Germany, Chile and Argentina, and generally the price/quality ration can’t be bettered. None of these wines sees a smidgeon of oak, the emphasis being on freshness and immediacy, though those qualities don’t mean that they don’t offer some depth and complexity too. Buy them by the case for drinking over the next six to 12 months. I tasted these wines at a local wholesaler’s trade event. Enjoy!
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Royal Chenin Blanc 2013, Western Cape, Swartland, South Africa. 13% alc. 100% chenin blanc (“steen’). Pale gold color; hay and honeysuckle, green tea and lemongrass, hint of roasted lemon and spiced pear; lovely mild citrus flavors, brisk acidity, sleek texture, finish has a hint of grapefruit; very tasty and attractive all around. Very Good+. About $9, a Bargain of the Century.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Siegel Crucero Sauvignon Blanc 2013, Curico Valley, Chile. 13% alc. 100% sauvignon blanc. Very pale gold hue; a touch of resin, a hint of dry grass, lemon, pear and lime peel; a note of melon and fig on the palate; quite crisp and lively, with a snappy finish. Very Good+. About $13.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Palacios de Bornos Verdejo 2013, Rueda, Spain. 13.5% alc. 100% verdejo grapes. Pale straw-gold hue; tremendously seductive bouquet of jasmine and lilac, tangerine and lime peel, lemon verbena, with backnotes of licorice and limestone; pulls up an herbal, slightly grassy character on the palate, with pert citrus flavors and notably crisp acidity and flint-like minerality, all ensconced in a moderately lush texture. Excellent. About $14, a Great Bargain.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Wolfberger Pinot Blanc 2013, Alsace, France. 12.5% alc. 100% pinot blanc. Very pale gold color; fresh, clean, breezy and bracing; lemon, lime and spiced pear, hints of cloves and mango; tremendous crisp, lively acidity and scintillating limestone element, with a touch of honeyed, baked peach for tenderness and nuances of dried herbs and flowers. Lovely heft and complexity. Excellent. About $14, another Great Bargain.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Wolfberger Edelzwicker 2013, Alsace, France. 11.5% alc. 40% pinot blanc, 30% riesling, 15% gewurztraminer, 15% muscat. Looking for a terrific wine to pour at a party or reception? Here’s just what you need. This blend of the chief grapes of Alsace is quite floral and pretty, fresh, clean and crisp; with notes of peach, pear and lime bolstered by lots of limestone minerality; fleet acidity keeps you going back for another sip. Very Good+. About $15 for a one-liter bottle, though in my neck o’ the woods it’s $17.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Chateau de Ségries Tavel Rosé 2013, Tavel, France. 14% alc. 50% grenache, 30% cinsault, 15% clairette, 5% syrah. Pale salmon-copper hue; strawberries and raspberries with notes of dried currants and peach and a hint of the dry, dusty herbal-grassy character the French call garrigue; dry and stony but tasty with red fruit flavors; lovely rosé but displaying a serious mineral edge. Excellent. About $20.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

« Previous PageNext Page »