Chardonnay


Let’s say this right up front: These four chardonnays from Grgich Hills Estate are world-class wines, competitive with chardonnays from any country and any region. They embody everything about the marriage of grace and power that characterizes the best examples of the grape, as well as the volumes of intuition, knowledge and experience required to produce such wines. The use of oak barrels is particularly thoughtful and deft. While the talented and skillful winemaker for Grgich Hills is Ivo Jeramaz, over all hovers the benign and venerable presence of Miljenko “Mike” Grgich, one of Napa Valley’s great pioneers. Devotees of the finest chardonnay wines will want these in their cellars.

These wines were samples for review, as I am required to inform My Readers by dictate of the Federal Trade Commission.
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The lean, tight and focused Grgich Hills 40th Anniversary Chardonnay 2014, Napa Valley, was fermented and aged 10 months in the standard 60-gallon French oak barrique, in this case 70 percent new barrels, the rest neutral. It’s a chardonnay of magnificent power and range, detail and dimension; it was shaped to offer a sense of poise and dignity that leans close to austerity while also delivering the complete package of juicy pear, pineapple and grapefruit flavors (slightly macerated and roasted) and encompassed in a texture that deftly balances incisive crispness with talc-like softness. I cannot emphasize enough what an impression of dynamism and completeness this wine makes on the palate or how powerful the influence of limestone minerality is from beginning to end, making for a chardonnay that feels perfectly poised between crystalline vibrancy and delicacy, on one hand, and the potent earthiness of smoke, ash and loam, on the other. 14.1 percent alcohol. A wonderful achievement, commemorating the winery’s 40th anniversary in 2017. Now through 2024 to ’28, if properly cared for. Exceptional. About $50.
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The Grgich Hills Miljenko’s Selection Chardonnay 2014, Napa Valley-Carneros, was fermented (with native yeast) and then aged 11 months in 900-gallon oak casks, and in case My Readers wonder about the size of the barrels, think in comparison that the standard barrel, the one you see when you tour wineries or in atmospheric photographs of aging cellars, contains 60 gallons. The color is pale straw-gold; it’s permeated by yellow fruit and flowers — pears, peaches and quince; jasmine and honeysuckle — bolstered by definitive notes of limestone, flint and graphite, heather and damp dusty roof tiles. Boy, this chardonnay offers tremendous presence on the palate; it’s dry and dense, even chewy, bursting with energy and vitality yet, withal, beautifully knit, almost elegant in its balance, this character lasting through the long, vibrant, mineral-laden finish. 14.1 percent alcohol. Production was 882 cases. Now through 2020 to ’24. Excellent. About $62.
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The Grgich Hills Miljenko’s Selection Chardonnay 2015, Napa Valley-Carneros, received the same oak treatment as its cousin from 2014, also with fermentation induced by native yeast — the yeast that naturally occurs in the vineyards and on the grapes — and did not undergo malolactic. In a testimony to consistency, these stablemates are very similar in character, though the 2015 possibly offers a slightly more refined, brighter aspect. The color is light straw-gold; aromas of pineapple and grapefruit are permeated by notes of mango and toasted coconut, apple and spiced pear, graphite and gun-flint. The lovely balance the wine displays is exquisite; all elements feel strung along a finely wrought line of fleet acidity and delicately chiseled limestone. A few moments in the glass bring out hints of lilac and camellia, while the structure, nicely dense yet lithe and supple, leads to a mineral-packed finish. 13.5 percent alcohol. Production was 875 cases. Drink now through 2022 to ’25. Excellent. About $60.
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Talk about lots of oak! The Grgich Hills Paris Tasting Commemorative Chardonnay 2014, Napa Valley, fermented in and then aged 12 months in French barriques, 70 percent new, and then six more months in French oak foudres, that is barrels that hold 1,500 gallons, though foudre is a flexible term. How did the wine emerge from this regimen? Crystalline with chiming acidity, scintillating with limestone minerality, vibrant, resonant, earthy and powerful, yet elegant, almost delicate in its marshaling of detail: notes of slightly baked pineapple and grapefruit, pear compote, smoke and cloves, mango, jasmine and almond skin. The color, by the way, is light gold; the wine is quite dry, yet so sleek, suave and supple that the texture comes close to being luxurious; its heft on the palate is glamorous and dynamic. 14.1 percent alcohol. Production was 942 cases. Drink now through 2022 to ’25. Exceptional. About $94.
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I’ll say right here, at the beginning of this post, that the result of tasting a short roster of chardonnay and pinot noir wines from the acclaimed Patz & Hall Wines was a conclusion too common in this series: I loved the pinot noirs, abhorred the chardonnays. The former I found exciting, multi-layered and slightly unpredictable, replete with pinot noir character yet each creating its own sense of detail and dimension. The chardonnays were entirely too predictable in the line of the dominant California style: too ripe and sweet with baked fruit qualities, too spicy, too oaky and intrinsically unbalanced. Those who disagree with me about these chardonnays and consider them and others like them some sort of epitome are, I know, manifold, and they are entitled to their opinion. The factors involved and of most importance for this blog are my nose and palate, and I can do naught else but follow their dictates.

Donald Patz and James Hall, who met while working for Flora Springs Winery, founded their enterprise, with their partners, in 1988. The winery owns no vineyards but makes wine on long-term contracts from highly acclaimed vineyards, primarily in Sonoma County. They sold the company to Ste. Michelle Wine Estates in April 2016.

These wines were samples for review.
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The color of the Patz & Hall Pinot Noir 2015, Sonoma Coast, is dark ruby fading to a transparent and then ethereal magenta rim. The wine aged in 40 percent new French oak barrels. This is a pure, bright, intriguing pinot noir, whose scents of red, black and blue fruit compote are spiked with notes of beetroot and rose petals, sandalwood and lavender; the wine is lithe, lean and supple on the palate, taut and spicy, and a few minutes in the glass bring in touches of wood smoke and autumn leaves, along with hints of pomegranate and cranberry. This is a cuvee blended from a roster of top Sonoma Coast vineyards, including Chenoweth, Dutton and Gap’s Crown. 14.2 percent alcohol. Now through 2020 or ’21. Excellent. About $48.
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The Patz & Hall Jenkins Ranch Pinot Noir 2015, Sonoma Coast, aged in 50 percent new French oak barrels. The color is a beautiful dark mulberry shading to a lighter magenta rim; concentrated aromas of black cherries, currants and plums feel dredged in dried baking spices and hints of rose petals and sassafras, fig and braised fennel. The wine displays a loamy, untamed character, framed by moderately dusty tannins and a burnished, slightly sanded texture, through which bright acidity cuts a swath; macerated and lightly roasted red and black fruit flavors open notes of smoke and damp ash, leading to a finish both generous and chiseled. 14.6 percent alcohol. Production was 650 cases. Now through 2022 to ’25. Excellent. About $60.
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The chardonnays in question are the Patz & Hall Chardonnay 2015, Sonoma Coast ($40); Patz & Hall Dutton Ranch Chardonnay 2015, Russian River Valley ($44); Patz & Hall Alder Springs Vineyard Chardonnay 2015, Mendocino ($60). These are bold and assertive wines in every respect: super-ripe fruit with baked apple and roasted pineapple and grapefruit scents and flavors, dense textures, no-holds-barred spiciness and drenching oak. I understand that many critics and consumers adore chardonnays fashioned in this manner, but I find them to be ruinous to the potential purity and crystalline clarity of which the chardonnay grape is wonderfully capable. The Alder Springs I found to be particularly egregious in its stiff and drying oak influence. If these rich, glossy and exaggerated examples mark your favorite style of chardonnay, go for them by all means. For me and my palate, I find them unpleasant, strident and undrinkable, either on their own or with food.
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Well, here’s a milestone of sorts: The 300th entry in the Wine of the Day series. My Readers may remember that I started the Wine of the Day in May 2015 when a broken right arm interfered with my writing abilities and I was able only to type in short, erratic bursts. Like Topsy, the thing just grew and two years and three months later, here we are at No. 300. Shall I continue? I would like to hear from you about this issue, bless your little pointy heads and may your tribes increase.

For this 300th posting in the series, I’ll nudge across the line to a celebratory mode and offer a new label and product from the distinguished Champagne house of Laurent-Perrier. This is the Laurent-Perrier La Cuvée NV, which replaces the former Brut NV — “non-vintage” — in the house’s roster. Composed of 55 percent chardonnay, 35 percent pinot noir and 10 percent pinot meunier, the Champagne contains 30 percent reserve wines and attains 94 percent premier cru rating. It spends a minimum of four years in bottle on the yeasts before disgorgement. The color is very pale gold, and I’ll say right here that this was the most energetically effervescent bottle of Champagne I have ever opened; tiny, glinting bubbles surged in what seemed to be an endless foaming fountain in the glass. Aromas of slightly roasted pears, peaches and quince are incredibly fresh, clean and enticing, with touches of just-baked brioche and almond skin and a lightly honeyed aspect of bee’s-wax and white flowers. Incisive acidity cuts a swath through a chiseled texture that feels like the transfigured quintessence of limestone and chalk; paradoxically, on the palate this Champagne also delivers an element of talc-like softness, the resulting tension between the dry, honed quality and the powdery lushness providing a great deal of excitement as you drink. Ultimately, the Laurent-Perrier La Cuvée leaves the impression of fine-boned elegance matched to dynamic power. 12 percent alcohol. Cellarmaster is Michel Fauconnet. We loved drinking this one. Excellent. About $50.

Imported by Laurent-Perrier USA, Long Island City, N.Y. A sample for review.

The Côté Mas Brut Rosé, Crémant de Limoux, barely qualifies as a rosé wine by most measures, being a blend of 70 percent chardonnay, 20 percent chenin blanc and 10 percent pinot noir. In other words, 90 percent of this charming sparkling wine is white, with only a few dollops of a red grape to lend the requisite rosé color, in this case a beguiling light copper-salmon hue animated by a stream of tiny, glinting bubbles. The nose is pure raspberry, peach and lime peel; a few moments in the glass bring out notes of heather and seashell. This is crisp, dry and tart on the palate, where lip-smacking acidity keeps it lively and engaging and the minerality of damp limestone and flint delivers reasonable structure for nice heft and balance, all these elements supporting subtle flavors of roasted lemon and strawberry. 12 percent alcohol. A lovely aperitif. You could sell about a million glasses in bars and restaurants. Very Good+. About $16 and often found discounted to $13 or $14.

Limoux has an interesting history, because the first sparkling wines were apparently developed there as early as 1531, at the Abbey St.-Hilaire, and pre-dating sparkling Champagne by 150 years. These wines, traditionally made from the mauzac grape, underwent a natural process of second fermentation in the bottle in the Spring after the harvest, as the temperature warmed. The fairly rustic Blanquette de Limoux sparkling wines were supplemented in 1990 by the creation of Crémant de Limoux, designed to be more modern and to exploit the increasing acreage in the region devoted to chardonnay and chenin blanc grapes. Limoux — pop. 9,781 souls — a commune and subprefecture in the Aude department in the vast Languedoc-Roussillon region, lies a mere 30 kilometers or 19 miles south of the celebrated castle-city of Carcassonne, nestled in the French foothills of the Pyrenees mountains.

Imported by Esprit du Vin, Boca Raton, Fla. A sample for review.

I don’t often feature chardonnays made in California in the Wine of the Day series because basically it’s difficult to find examples that aren’t overblown with strident spice, rampant tropical fruit and strenuous oak. When I find one that matches my idea of what chardonnay should be, however, I will man the barricades for it. Such a one is the Ramey Wine Cellars Chardonnay 2014, Russian River Valley. David Ramey is one of the busiest people in the Golden State’s wine industry, overseeing his own roster of mainly single-vineyard chardonnay, cabernet sauvignon, pinot noir and syrah under his primary label, but also managing a recently launched second label, Sidebar, as well as consulting for a wide range of top producers. It requires a pinpoint sense of attention to detail to be able to carry off such a spectrum of activity and responsibility. The Ramey Chardonnay 2014, RRV, falls under the winery’s Appellation series that features wines made from grapes derived from vineyards including several that Ramey uses for his single-vineyard bottlings. The wine fermented by natural yeasts and underwent full malolactic and bâtonnage, that is, stirring of the lees while in barrel; it aged 12 months in French oak, only 13 percent new barrels, so the wood influence is almost subliminal, a subtle shaping. The color is pale straw-gold; the whole package feels like a fine sifting of fruit, spice, oak and minerals, animated by bright, persistent acidity. Scents of apple peel, pineapple and grapefruit open to smoky notes of roasted lemon, cloves and lemon balm, over layers of slightly dusty limestone. Notably clean and dry, this is one lithe and chiseled chardonnay that features ripe, spicy citrus and stone-fruit flavors washed by a texture that’s like pulverized flint; the sense of deftness combined with heft is remarkably gratifying on the palate. 14.5 percent alcohol. At close to three years old, this chardonnay is drinking beautifully and will continue to do so through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $40.

A sample for review.

Fathers & Daughters Cellars only made its first wine in 2015, though the family, longtime owners of the Ferrington Vineyard in Mendocino County’s Anderson Valley, for many years sold primarily pinot noir grapes to such highly regarded labels as Williams-Selyam, Flowers and Arista. The winery represents a collaborative and multi-generational effort of the “fathers and daughters” in the family: Patriarch Kurt Schoeneman, his daughter Sarah, Sarah’s husband Guy Pacurar, their daughter, Ella, and Guy’s older daughter, Taylor. Winemaker is Phillip Baxter. I was mightily and sort of incrementally impressed with the trio of wines reviewed on this page today, particularly the limited production Ella’s Reserve Pinot Noir 2014, which any devotee of West Coast pinot noirs should search for diligently.

These wines were samples for review.
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First, a sort of jeu d’esprit of a lightly effervescent sparkling wine, the Fathers & Daughters Cellars Sarah’s Rustic Bubbles 2016, Anderson Valley. With no second fermentation in the bottle as is the case with most sparkling wines, including Champagne (or in tank, in the Charmat process), this delightful and intriguing wine is made in what in parts of France is called the methode ancestrale or methode rurale, that is, a young wine is bottled before all the residual sugar has transformed into alcohol, so the fermentation that continues in the bottle produces carbon dioxide, hence: bubbles. For this wine, the initial fermentation was in all neutral French oak barrels. Sarah’s Rustic Bubbles ’16 was made completely from chardonnay grapes, being, in reality, a blanc de blancs. The color is pale yellow-gold, animated by a steady but narrow stream of tiny, foaming bubbles; the bouquet is characterized by freshly cut lemons, ginger, cloves and seashell salinity; the whole effect is of light, delicate brightness, garden freshness, but exhibiting a touch of muscat’s foxy petrol nature and hints of peach, heather and chalk. 13.9 percent alcohol. Could be an essential Summer quaff, except that production was 100 cases. Contact the winery to see if the tasting room can ship you a few bottles. Very Good+. About $19.
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A blend of sauvignon blanc, gewurztraminer and chardonnay, the Father’s & Daughters “The Dance” 2016, Anderson Valley, is a perfect wine for Summer sipping. Fresh as a daisy, with a sort of fruit cocktail-pear compote quality, the wine offers a pale straw-gold color and a light, delicately sweet apple character touched by a broad floral nature and hints of straw and meadowy herbs and flowers. It’s a bit musky — the gewurztraminer speaking — and very dry from mid-palate back through the finish blithely furnished with notes of spiced peaches, quince, lemongrass and limestone minerality. 13.7 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018. This one really grew on me. Excellent. About $28.
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All right, the previously mentioned wines were attractive, interesting and entertaining, certainly worthy of attention. The Father’s & Daughters Ella’s Reserve Pinot Noir 2014, Anderson Valley, however, is something else, as in among the very best pinot noirs I have tasted this year, a wine of profound yet ineffable elegance and power. The grapes were hand-harvested, and fermentation was accomplished by native yeasts; the wine saw no new oak but aged 18 months in 30 percent once-used French barrels and 70 percent neutral barrels. The color is lovely limpid cherry shading to a delicate invisible rim; aromas of ripe black and red currants are permeated by notes of cloves and rose petals, cranberry and loam, beetroot and rhubarb. The wine is beautifully balanced and integrated, lithe, supple and satiny on the palate but pulling up a burgeoning tide of iodine and graphite, briers and brambles and a touch of flinty austerity; a few moments in the glass unfold elements of sandalwood and cherry compote. Energized by bright acidity, the wine delivers a long follow-through for the finish. 13.8 percent alcohol. Drink through 2020 to ’22. Production was 110 cases. Exceptional. About $42.
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Doubtless white Burgundies of more profound depth and dimension are produced in the great appellations of Meursault, Puligny-Montrachet and Chassagne-Montrachet in the Côte de Beaune, but you would be hard-pressed to find one that offers a more beautiful expression of the chardonnay grape than the Domaine Marc Roy “Les Champs Perdrix” Marsannay 2015. The interesting point here is that Marsannay is the northernmost of Burgundy’s appellations, lying only 6 to 8 kilometers southwest of the city of Dijon. This is primarily red wine — that is to say, pinot noir — territory, as is true of the Côte de Nuits down past the city of Beaune. Chardonnay is a distinct minority in Marsannay — interestingly, pinot blanc is allowed — which is also the only appellation in Burgundy with its own designation for rosé. Domaine Marc Roy owns only four hectares of vines, just under 10 acres, which is minuscule even by Burgundian standards. Most of these are in Gevrey-Chambertin — no Grand Cru or Premier Cru vines — with a slim portion for the chardonnay in Marsannay; the estate is headquartered in Gevrey. Winemaker is fourth generation Alexandrine Roy. Grapes are hand-harvested; the wines ferment by natural yeasts and are given a very conservative oak regimen, this “Champs Perdrix” seeing only 10 percent new oak. The chardonnay vines are 40 years old.

The color is pale gold; at first, the wine delivers pure lemon in every respect, gradually adding an infusion of lime peel and heather, a hint of grapefruit, a touch of seashell; a lovely talc-like texture is riven by bright acidity that adds a keynote of crisp liveliness. The wine is quite dry, but juicy with slightly spiced and macerated pineapple and grapefruit flavors that take on a depth of loamy-damp ash earthiness and limestone-flint minerality; a few moments in the glass unfurl ethereal elements of jasmine, lilac and orange rind. 13 percent alcohol. We drank this bottle last night with seared salmon marinated in olive oil, lemon juice and soy sauce and given a coffee rub-urfa-and-maresh crust. The pairing was absolutely right. A beguiling and seductive model of varietal purity and intensity. Drink through 2020 or ’21. Excellent. About $50.

Production was seven barrels, about 175 cases, so mark this one Worth a Search. Purchased recently at Le Dû’s Wines in New York. The label image is one vintage behind. Imported by Michael Skurnik Wines, Syosset, N.Y.

What more is there to say after “delightful and charming”? These are wines designed to provide your weekend — or the whole week, for that matter — with pleasure, deliciousness and elegance. We range widely in this post: Greece, Germany, Oregon, California, Long Island, Mendoza and Chablis. All single-variety wines, their grapes include assyrtiko, indigenous to the island of Santinori; pinot gris, not that common in the Rhineland; riesling and sauvignon blanc; gruner veltliner and pinot blanc; semillon and chardonnay. As usual in these Weekend Wine Notes, I largely eschew technical, historical and geographical data for the sake of quick, incisive reviews meant to pique your interest and whet your palate. With one exception, the wines were samples for review. Enjoy! (In moderation, of course.)
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argyros
Estate Argyros Assyrtiko 2015, Santinori, Greece. 14% alc. This one will make you wish you were sitting in a little cafe looking out at the wine-dark Aegean Sea. It sees 20 percent French oak and was made from 150-year-old ungrafted vines. Very pale straw hue; dusty, dry marsh and seashore grasses and herbs; roasted lemon and faint spiced peach; quite ethereal and summery but displaying bracing acidity, notes of limestone-seashell minerality and an aura of yellow meadow flowers. Very Good+. About $25.
Athenee Importers and Distributors, Hempstead, N.Y.
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binz
Weingut Binz Nackenheimer Pinot Gris Kabinett 2015, Rheinhessen, Germany. 12% alc. Bright straw-gold color; jasmine and camellia, preserved lemon and lemon balm, lime peel and pear skin; a hint of mango-like tropical character; crisp and tart, taut with vibrant acidity, very dry yet ripe and juicy on the palate; long, lean, lithe finish. Truly delightful and lots of personality. Excellent. About $14, marking Great Value.
Winesellers Ltd, Niles, Illinois.
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brooks riesling
Brooks Riesling 2015, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 12.5% alc. Pale straw-gold; a direct hit of petrol and rubber eraser, followed by notes of heather and meadow, peach and lychee, with burgeoning hints of jasmine and quince and, after a few moments, ginger beer; limestone minerality offers a tremendous presence for a sense of dimension, without diminishing such fine details as bay leaf and nuances of mango and guava; the whole enterprise feels etched with bright, dry acidity. Just great. Excellent. About $20, representing Wonderful Value.
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2016SauvBlanc
Freemark Abbey Sauvignon Blanc 2016, Napa Valley. 13.4% alc. Very pale straw-gold color; notes of lime peel, grapefruit, lemongrass and spiced pear, highlighted by hints of pea-shoots, hay and heather and undertones of sunny, leafy figs; really lively, vibrant, super drinkable, yet spare, dry, lithe, nothing flamboyant or over-done; a finish chiseled from limestone and flint but wreathed in lilac. Excellent. About $24.
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Illahe Estate Gruner Veltliner 2016, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 13.5% alc. 650 cases. Very pale straw-gold; classic ILLAHEHEADER_famowned notes of hay, lilac and pine, with roasted lemons and yellow plums, a hint of lime peel and peach; very crisp, lively and engaging, with clean acidity and crystalline minerality cutting through a juicy, talc-like texture; terrific personality and appeal. Excellent. About $17.
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Lieb Cellars Reserve Pinot Blanc 2015, North Fork of Long Island. 11.9% alc. And this one will make you wish you were sitting on a terrace in the Hamptons, gazing out at the cerulean Atlantic. Very very pale, almost invisible in the glass; notably clean, fresh and spare, quite crisp and vibrant, with delicate strains of peach and spiced pear, rose petals and candied lime peel and a tremendous volume of limestone minerality; slightly herbal and resinous finish. Lovely character. Excellent. About $22.
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Una Seleccion de Ricardo Santos Semillon 2016, Mendoza, Argentina. 13.5% alc. Medium green-gold hue; sunny, leafy figs Santos_SM_NV_labeland guava, apple skin and lightly baked pear; a haze of smoke and jasmine; quite clean, spare and elegant, with a beguiling texture that balances moderate lushness of fruit with zinging acidity and flint-graphite minerality, though that aspect emerges on the finish. Wholly delightful and pleasingly complex for the price. Excellent. About $16, marking Good Value.
Global Vineyards, Berkeley, Calif.
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chablis
Christian Simon Petit Chablis 2014, Chablis, France. 12% alc. Drinking beautifully at about two and a half years old. Pale straw-gold; shimmers with steel and limestone and a snap of gunflint, lustrous with lightly spiced lemon and apple; a texture both dense and powdery, lithe and supple; warms to subtle floral notes; lovely shape and resonance. Excellent. About $22, a local purchase.
Matinicus Wines, Beverley Hills, Fla.
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No, film buffs, I am not referring to the great and controversial film by Spanish director Pedro Almodóvar, released in 1990, but to this pair of wines that feature tied-up and chained captives on their labels, reproductions of etchings by Goya, and are named The Prisoner and Blindfold. Not surprisingly, the wines, a red and a white, are bold, passionate and vivacious, qualities that work for the red but not, as you will see, for the white. As often happens in California, the tale of The Prisoner is complicated. Dave Phinney created this popular zinfandel blend shortly after founding Orin Swift Cellars in 1998, increasing sales to about 80,000 cases annually. He sold the brand to Huneeus Vintners early in 2010, who in turn sold The Prisoner Wine Company to Constellation Brands in April 2016 for about $285 million. Meanwhile, Phinney sold Orin Swift to E&J Gallo in June last year. There’s a lot of money flowing around the West Coast, I’d say. Winemaker for The Prisoner Wine Company is Chrissy Wittmann; consulting winemaker is Jen Beloz. These wines were samples for review.
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wine-hero-the-prisoner
First, the good, and My Readers will be surprised, because I don’t typically endorse a wine bearing alcohol degrees of 15 percent or higher. The Prisoner Red Wine 2015, Napa Valley, is a bold and exuberant blend that emphasizes zinfandel with the fairly unusual addition of cabernet sauvignon, petite sirah, syrah and charbono; the wine aged an unspecified amount of time in French and American oak, 30 percent new barrels. The color is opaque black-purple with a magenta rim, dark as a dungeon, you might say; a big snootful of graphite, lavender and wood-smoke assails the nose, woven with very ripe and spicy black currants, blueberries and plums; a few minutes in the glass bring in notes of cherries, iodine and fruitcake, with the latter’s component of figs, dried fruit, brandy-soaked raisins and baking spices. The wine displays undeniable grip and power, a tide of bright acidity, rollicking velvety dust-and-leather-girt tannins and a granitic edge, all the while allowing its elements of ripe black and blue fruit flavors plenty of play. 15.2 percent alcohol. Grilled ribs, perhaps, or pork chops rubbed with cumin and smoked paprika? Here’s your wine. Now through 2020 or ’21. Excellent. About $47.
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wine-hero-blindfold
The Blindfold White Wine 2014, carrying a general “California” designation, is predominantly chardonnay, with some chenin blanc and a coalition of Rhone varieties — roussanne, viognier, grenache blanc and marsanne. The wine aged for 10 months, 85 percent in a combination of French and Hungarian oak, 25 percent new barrels, and the rest in stainless steel. Sounds like a recipe for an interesting, even intriguing white wine, n’est-ce pas? Unfortunately, this one embodies everything that I abhor about overblown, exaggerated white wine from the Golden State, exhibiting all the unbalanced qualities of strident spice, cloying floral nature, over-ripe tropical character, butterscotch, toffee and burnt toast that make such wines undrinkable. Someone must like them, but I am not a member of that cohort. Not recommended. About $32.
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And here’s a tasty, accessible chardonnay for Wine of the Day, No. 257. The Martin Ray Chardonnay 2016, carries a Sonoma County MR-16-SC-Chard-frtdesignation, featuring grapes that derive from the Russian River Valley, Sonoma Valley and Carneros AVAs. Any wood influence is minimal, more in the shaping spirit of subtlety and suppleness; the wine sees 35 percent new French oak barrels. The color is very pale straw-gold; it’s a fresh, clean and crisp chardonnay that offers classic notes of clove-inflected pineapple and grapefruit, with hints of quince and ginger and a lovely, lively texture that feels as if you’re sipping liquid quartz, so, yes, there’s a tantalizing mineral aspect. The wine is quite dry but juicy on the palate with citrus and stone-fruit flavors, all leading to a bright, spicy, limestone finish. 13.8 percent alcohol. Now through 2018, maybe ’19, and a shoo-in for your house chardonnay, especially during the Summer, and for restaurant and bar by-the-glass programs. Very Good+. About $17.

A sample for review.

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