California


LL made pappardelle with chanterelles; I opened the Smith-Madrone Chardonnay 2011, Spring Mountain District, Napa Valley. Ka-wham! Synergy. Meeting of true minds. Cosmic twins. Sublime dish with a divine wine. I could probably stop there, but you know I won’t. The wine is made from a high-elevation dry-farmed — that means no irrigation — vineyard planted 39 years ago. What’s remarkable is that the wines went through complete barrel-fermentation and aged in 100 percent new French oak barrels, yet it retains no sense of being woody or over-oaked or stridently spicy; those excellent mature grapes soaked up that oak and came out as a supple, subtly spicy and deeply nuanced chardonnay. The color is brilliant medium gold; aromas of pineapple, grapefruit and roasted lemon carry notes of jasmine and camellia, a hint of cloves, a bell-tone of mango. The wine is unusually dense and substantial without being heavy or viscous; it’s quite dry, almost tannic in effect, but it feels permeated with light and grace and elegance. a lithe and resonant construct of stones and bones, which is to say, abandoning metaphor, that it’s thoroughly enlivened by bright acidity and scintillating limestone minerality. The Smith brothers do it again. 14.2 percent alcohol. Production was 463 cases. Drink now through 2021 to ’23. Exceptional. About $30, a price more than fair for the quality.

This wine was a sample for review.

Because the Wine of the Week is a couple of days late, here’s a twofer, a red and a white. These wines were samples for review.
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The white is the Jekel Vineyards Riesling 2012, Monterey, a medium gold-colored wine that exudes winsome notes of golden apples, grapefruit and lime peel with touches of mango, lychee and candied orange rind; there’s just enough mineral action going on, in the form of a scintillating limestone element, and bright acidity, to keep it on the straight-and-narrow path. Faintly sweet on entry, with spiced peach and grapefruit flavors, the wine turns bone-dry through the finish. 13 percent alcohol. Winemaker was Charlie Gilmore. Drink now through 2014. Quite charming. Very Good+. About $16.
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For the bonus wine, we’ll go with the Noble Vines 1 Red Blend 2011, carrying a California designation. This well-made amalgam of merlot, cabernet sauvignon and zinfandel is a product of DFV Wines, that is to say, the umbrella of the Indelicato family for a wide range of labels. Their legacy in Monterey goes back to 1924 and vines planted by Italian immigrant Gaspare Indelicato. The color is medium ruby with a magenta tinge; scents of black raspberries, black currants and plums include notes of graphite, lavender and blueberry tart. Tasty and spicy black and blue fruit flavors are ably supported by moderately dusty, chewy tannins, a clean mineral element and bright acidity. Lots of verve and personality. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2015. Very Good+. About $15.
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It’s true that Thanksgiving has come and gone, but I wanted to offer my notes — made in the kitchen, not at the table; that would be impolite — on the wines we imbibed during and after the great feast. I always offer a riesling, this year two, a zinfandel and a pinot noir, and I don’t usually deviate from the actual wines. Of course, Christmas is coming right up, and many households will mount the same or a similar meal, so these wines, or ones like them, would be equally appropriate. The idea, as you have doubtless read a thousand times in the past few weeks, is to serve wines that somehow encompass the range of Thanksgiving dinner’s complimentary and contradictory sweet and savory sensations. This trio has stood the test of the FK/LL groaning board for years, changing only vintages as time rolls along; the added riesling is one that I have tasted from several past vintages and never been disappointed. Unless indicated, these wines were purchased by me. Today’s reviews in Weekend Wine Notes are rather more full-bodied than usual. Enjoy!
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The additional wine this year was the Smith-Madrone Riesling 2012, Spring Mountain District, Napa Valley, produced by brothers Charles and Stuart Smith, who share growing and winemaking duties. The color is a shimmery pale gold with fleeting green highlights; aromas of green apple, pear and lemon are infused with jasmine, lime peel and limestone. Flavors of roasted lemon, lychee and peach are fresh, ripe and lightly spiced, while crisp acidity and scintillating limestone and flint minerality lend the wine verve and excitement. 12.5 percent alcohol. Production was 463 cases. Drink now through 2018 to 2020. This was a sample for review. Excellent. About $27.
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The Trefethen Dry Riesling, Oak Knoll District, Napa Valley, has appeared at our Thanksgiving dinner for years. I tend to like this riesling with a year or two of age — in 2011, we drank the ’08; in 2010, we drank the ’07 — to give it some golden burnish, and I mean that in terms of color but also metaphorically in a sense of sensual glow. The 2012 was what my local wine merchant had on the shelf, though, and he remembered that I like this wine at the present festive time of year. So, the color of the Trefethen Dry Riesling 2012 is very pale straw-gold; a bouquet of apple, pear and lychee wreathes notes of peach and honeysuckle and an intriguing hint of petrol or rubber eraser. In the mouth, flavors of roasted lemon and spiced pear are pointed with ginger and quince and equipped with a spare elegant texture that features crackling acidity and high-toned chalk and flint qualities. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2016 to ’18. Excellent. About $23.
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In 2010, we drank the Domaine Serene Yamhill Cuvée Pinot Noir 2007, Willamette Valley, with Thanksgiving leftovers. This year was the turn of the Domaine Serene Yamhill Cuvée Pinot Noir 2009. The Yamhill Cuvée is the winery’s cadet pinot noir, made from estate vineyards but not as a single-vineyard or reserve wine. I first tasted the 2009 at a trade event in the middle of February this year; I bought a bottle last week, and it feels as if the wine — or at least this bottle — is reaching the peak of its development. The color is radiant medium ruby with a touch of garnet; notes of black cherries, plums and black currants are touched with elements of fruitcake, smoked game and loam. A few minutes in the glass bring out hints of melon and sour cherry that linger above a supple satiny texture buoyed by moderate tannins and slightly fading acidity. Quite delicious but not as fresh and vibrant as the example I tried nine months ago. Very Good+. About $45.

Image, much cropped, from sipswirlsavor.com.
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It’s not exactly cheating, but this year, instead of buying a bottle, as I usually do, of the Ridge Vineyards Three Valleys, a red blend that includes zinfandel, I substituted a 100 percent zinfandel wine, the Ridge Benito Dusi Ranch Zinfandel 2011, Paso Robles. This, I think, was the Wine of Night. Made from vines planted in 1923, and aged 12 months in a combination of one- to five-year-old American oak barrels, the Ridge Paso Robles Zinfandel 2011 — the label, as you see, emphasizes the AVA rather than the single vineyard — offers a lovely dark ruby color with a lighter magenta rim; a bright and lively bouquet of raspberries, black currants and plums is highlighted by notes of red cherries, briers and brambles and a touch of black fruit compote. On the palate, the wine weaves smoke and leather and graphite with raspberry and black currant flavors wrapped around an intense core of violets, lavender and dried thyme, all supported by moderately dusty and chewy tannins and a fine line of crisply etched acidity. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $30 .
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The black kite of the winery name is not a fabrication of paper and sticks tossed on the wind at the end of a long string but a species of bird. Black Kite Cellars traces its origins to 1995, when Donald and Maureen Green bought a 40-acre parcel by the Navarro River just west of Philo in Mendocino County, in a cool area eight miles from the coast. They replanted an old vineyard with pinot noir vines and developed two more blocks on a hill above the river. The first crop was harvested in 2003, and the decision to retain a portion of the grapes to make their own wine brought the concept of Black Kite Cellars, named for a bird indigenous to the region, to fruition. Jeff Gaffner became winemaker in 2004; the first wines he worked on comprised the 2005 bottlings of distinct blocks within the estate. Black Kite pinot noirs showed up on my lists of 50 Great Wines of 2009 and 50 Great of 2011.
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Black Kite “Kite’s Rest” 2010 and Black Kite “Kite’s Rest” 2011, Anderson Valley. 14.5 and 14.3 percent alcohol respectively. These spend about 11 months in French oak, 40 percent new barrels. The ’10 version offers a medium ruby-magenta hue and enticing aromas and flavors of rhubarb, sassafras, beetroot and cranberries; the wine is lively and vibrant, with piercing slate-like minerality and slightly dusty tannins. Lovely purity and intensity. 541 cases. Now through 2018 or ’19. Excellent. About $45. The ’11 rendition displays a light ruby-red cherry color; it’s much more reticent than the ’10 and more structured, with leathery tannins, briers and brambles and a pronounced graphite mineral element. Pretty tightly wound. 953 cases. Try from 2015 through 2020. Very Good+. About $45.
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Black Kite Soberanes Vineyard Pinot Noir 2010 and Black Kite Soberanes Vineyard Pinot Noir 2011, Santa Lucia Highlands.
The alcohol content is 14.6 percent for 2010, 14.9 percent for 2011. These wines also age about 11 months in French oak but in 50 percent new barrels. The ’10 sports a vivid dark ruby-garnet color; the wine is ripe and a little fleshy and funky, with a dollop of briery earthiness and tinges of smoke. Scents and flavors of black cherries, currants and blueberries are infused with cloves and sandalwood for an overall sense of spicy warmth. 149 cases. Drink through 2018 or ’19. Excellent. About $55. The Soberanes ’11 is perhaps the most attractive of this group of pinot noirs from Black Kite. The color is lustrous medium ruby; heady aromas of sassafras, rhubarb, cranberry and blueberry are permeated by notes of cloves, macerated black cherries, briers and brambles; the wine is super satiny yet a touch raspy and underbrushy; you feel the earth and the roots; bright acidity keeps it lively, while mild slightly dusty tannins add depth. Great purity and intensity. 273 cases. Drink through 2018 to ’20. Excellent. About $55.
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Black Kite Stony Terrace Pinot Noir 2010, Anderson Valley. The color is medium ruby, slightly lighter at the rim; a sniff opens a trove of cloves, lavender and lilacs, black cherries and red currants, a hint of plums and mint; lip-smacking acidity and smacky tannins give the wine a lively and somewhat substantial structure, though the whole impression is of a pinot noir that revels in being clean, fresh and wild. 14.6 percent alcohol. 153 cases. Now through 2018 or ’19. Excellent. About $52.
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Black Kite Redwood’s Edge Block Pinot Noir 2010, Anderson Valley. The color is medium ruby with a mulberry tinge; violets and lavender form the leading edge of a bouquet that teems with notes of red and black currants and red and black cherries, highlighted with cloves, sassafras and underbrush. In the mouth, this pinot noir is super succulent and supple, spicy and savory, but it’s also quite dry and — speaking of redwood — the oak emerges to a slightly obtrusive degree. 14.6 percent alcohol. Perhaps a year or two with help it smooth out. 149 cases. Very Good+. About $55.
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Black Kite Rivers Turn Pinot Noir 2010, Anderson Valley. The medium ruby color carries a touch of magenta; this is cool with penetrating graphite-tinged minerals; warm with clove-spiked spice; lively with arrow-bright acidity; succulent with black and blue fruit flavors; shapely with mildly dusty tannins and oak; richly detailed with notes of rose petals, pomegranate, cranberry, briers and brambles. I love it. Drink now through 2018 or ’19. 152 cases. Excellent. About $52.
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Black Kite Angel Hawk Reserve Pinot Noir 2010, Anderson Valley. This reserve wine, which sees 20 months in French oak, derives from the winery’s Kites Rest Vineyard. The color is a limpid medium ruby with marked intensity of hue, I mean fucking gorgeous; aromas of spiced and macerated plums and red and black cherries and currants are permeated by hints of rose petals and lilac. It’s a substantial pinot noir, as befits a reserve wine, but it does not overwhelm with sheer size or oaken influence; it is, instead, supple and mouth-filling, and it displays layers of briers, brambles, graphite and moderately dusty tannins for foundation and framing. 14.9 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2019 to ’20. 114 cases. Excellent. About $80.
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The holiday season stretching from Thanksgiving to Twelfth Night, with Christmas and New Years monumental stops on the road, is almost upon us. If you’re looking for a house sparkling wine that’s far better than cheap tank-generated sparklers but nothing as expensive and thought-provoking as the more luxurious examples from California and Champagne, here’s a candidate. The Laetitia Brut Cuvée, a nonvintage sparkling wine from San Luis Obispo County’s Arroyo Grande Valley, is a blend of pinot noir, chardonnay and pinot blanc grapes, produced in the traditional champagne method by a winery noted for its precisely made single-vineyard pinot noirs. The color is pale gold with a slight shimmer of silver in the upward surge of tiny bubbles. This feels like steel and snow, biscuits and lemon curd, apples and pears, with cloves and almond skin in the background and a foundation of scintillating limestone. A few moments in the glass bring in notes of tangerine and grapefruit, the whole package enlivened by crisp and vibrant acidity. Laetitia Brut Cuvée spend 24 months en tirage – no, not triage — that is, two years in the bottle resting on the lees of the yeast cells and touch of sugar that stimulated the second fermentation. 12.5 percent alcohol. Production was 3,600 cases. Thoroughly enjoyable and engaging, close to elegant. Very Good+. About $25.

A sample for review.


Edoardo Seghesio and his wife Angela put down roots in Sonoma County’s northern Alexander Valley in 1895, building a house and planting their Home Ranch to zinfandel vines. The historic winery, owned by Crimson Wine Group since 2011, has a long tradition, then, of making zinfandel wines, though the family didn’t start bottling under its own label until 1983. The example suggested today as Wine of the Week is the Seghesio Zinfandel 2011, Sonoma County, a blend of zinfandel grapes from vineyards in Alexander and Dry creek Valleys. It aged 10 months in American and French oak barrels, 75 percent and 25 percent respectively. This deep ruby-purple hued zinfandel bursts with notes of blackberries, blueberries and black currants seemingly steeped in graphite and lavender with bass-tones of earthy briers and brambles. Vibrant acidity keeps the wine lively and appealing, while moderately dense and dusty tannins and granitic minerality lend weight and vigor. Spicy black and blue fruit flavors are juicy and lip-smackin’ ripe, but not at all over-ripe or jammy. The complete effect is of a creature slightly untamed but essentially balanced and integrated. 14.8 percent alcohol. The Seghesio Zinfandel 2011 is drinking perfectly now and would be ideal for Thanksgiving’s groaning board. Excellent. Suggested price for the wine is $24, but many retail outlets around the country have it discounted to $20.

Tasted at a wholesaler’s trade event.

Anyone who keeps up with this blog — bless your bones and may your tribe increase! — will deduce that I receive a great deal of cabernet sauvignon wines from California as review samples. In fact, I would say, anecdotally, that I receive more samples of California’s premier wine that any other type or genre, hence the attention paid to such wines on these pages. The 12 examples under consideration today mainly, that is with one exception, do not fall into the over-ripe, over-oaked, high alcohol category that we frequently encounter, and that exception has to do with the oak influence. Primarily, these are well-balanced fruit-filled cabernets amply supported by essential tannins, acidity and mineral qualities to ensure liveliness and some measure of longevity. Several of them are among the best California cabernets I have tried in 2012. As usual in the Weekend Wine Notes, I deliberately downplay details of history, geography, personality and technical matters in order to provide quick reviews designed to whet your palate and pique your interest. These wines were all samples for review. Enjoy!

The image is of cabernet sauvignon grapes at Jordan Vineyards.
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Cimarone Wines Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Three Creek Vineyard, Happy Canyon of Santa Barbara. 14.5% alc. Dark ruby with a magenta rim; nicely balanced, clean and fresh, tasty black and red fruit flavors; rather rigorous tannins, with classic touches of walnut shell and wheatmeal, but deftly integrated; hints of black olive, thyme, cedar and graphite; pleasing detail and dimension. Now through 2018 to 2020. Very Good+. About $35.
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Cimarone Le Clos Secret 2010, Three Creek Vineyard, Happy Canyon of Santa Barbara. 14.5% alc. 62% cabernet sauvignon, 14% petit verdot, 10% cabernet franc, 9% merlot, 5% malbec. 198 cases. Dark ruby shading to a slightly lighter ruby/mulberry hue; layered bouquet of walnut shell, graphite, cedar, thyme and rosemary; spiced and macerated aromas and flavors of red and black currants and cherries, ripe and slightly stewed; dense, intense, concentrated; exquisitely balanced but with a powerful structure and dynamic acidity for length and vitality. Now through 2019 to ’22. Excellent. About $40.
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Ferrari-Carano Trésor 2009, Alexander Valley, Sonoma County. 14.4% alc. 76% cabernet sauvignon, 8% merlot, 8% petit verdot, 6% malbec, 2% cabernet franc. Deep ruby-purple color; dusty walnut shell, fig and black olive, cedar and thyme; very intense and concentrated, tightly-wound; spiced and macerated black and blue fruit scents and flavors; iron-sides clasped with graphite; vibrant acidity and resonant tannins; a little inchoate and chthonic presently, try from 2015 or ’16 through 2022 to ’25. Very Good+ with Excellent potential. About $52.
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Franciscan Estate Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Napa Valley. 13.5% alc. 85% cabernet sauvignon, 11% merlot, 3% syrah, 1% malbec. Dark ruby color, slightly lighter at the rim; oak is the defining feature, the only one of these 12 wines to be so thoroughly imbued with wood; very dry, dense and chewy; walnut shell and wheatmeal, underbrush and forest floor; austere finish; for those who like their red wines to hit back. Not recommended. About $28.
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Jordan Cabernet Sauvignon 2009, Alexander Valley. 13.5% alc. 75% cabernet sauvignon, 19% merlot, 5% petit verdot, 1% malbec. Dark ruby-mulberry color; the most highly structured Jordan cabernet I have encountered, fortunately stimulated by bright acidity and gorgeous black and red fruit; wheatmeal, walnut shell, graphite, cedar and rosemary; very pure, intense and high-toned, with penetrating granitic minerality; very dry but seductively flavorful; bolstered by dense, tense tannins. Try from 2015 through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $53.
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Louis M. Martini Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Sonoma County. 13.9% alc. With dollops of merlot and petite sirah. Dark ruby color; black currants, plums, raspberries, undertones of smoky and macerated black cherries; very dry, dusty, minerally and tannic; full-bodied, with taut acidity, chewy and velvety texture; gets drier and dustier, with briers and branches, underbrush and loam qualities; finishes fairly austerely. Try 2015 through 2018 or ’19. Very Good+. About $18.
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Louis M. Martini Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Alexander Valley, Sonoma County. 14.5% alc. With 10% petite sirah. Intense dark ruby-magenta color; cool mint, iodine, iron and graphite; raspberries, black currants and plums, cedar and thyme; touch of spicy black cherry jam, earth and loam; rigorously structured, dense and chewy, with dust-permeated oak and tannins leading to austerity leavened by juicy black fruit flavors. Try 2015 or ’16 through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $30.
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Chateau Montelena Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Calistoga, Napa Valley. 13.9% alc. With 7% merlot and 2% cabernet franc. Radiant medium ruby color; a typical, classic and gratifying blend of sensual appeal and structural precision; very ripe yet intense and concentrated scents and flavors of spiced and macerated black currants and black cherries, touches of cloves and sandalwood, cedar and tobacco, bare hints of black olives and rosemary (with the latter’s redolent and slightly resinous character); iodine and iron, licorice and bitter chocolate; dignified tannins with a display of hauteur and some asperity, yet a cabernet of great appeal and potential. Who needs a $500 cult cabernet when you can have this? Now (with a steak or braised lamb shanks) through 2020 to ’24. Excellent. About $50.
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Ramey Wine Cellars Annum 2009, Napa Valley. 15% alc. With 12% petit verdot. Intense dark ruby-purple color; whoa, just a huge wine in every respect, epitome of the old iron-fist-in-velvet-glove concept, and with an uncanny sense of alertness; very dense, very chewy but the highly polished oak and tannins are not only not punishing but balanced and integrated; graphite, cedar and tobacco; ripe, spicy, racy and slightly roasted black currants, black cherries and plums, every aspect permeated by granitic minerality. A benchmark Napa cabernet. Try from 2015 or ’16 through 2022 to ’25. Excellent. About $95.
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Rodney Strong Estate Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Alexander Valley, Sonoma County. 14.5% alc. Deep ruby color, with a violet tinge at the rim; cool and clean, teeming with black currant, black cherry and plum scents and flavors; freighted with powerful and dusty tannins, grainy and chewy, yet a supple, lithe cabernet; quite intense and concentrated, robust and dynamic; all wrapped around a penetrating core of licorice, lavender and bitter chocolate; long, dense but smooth finish. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $28.
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St. Supéry Estate Cabernet Sauvignon 2009, Napa Valley. 14.7% alc. With 5% merlot. Deep ruby-purple color with a mulberry rim, opaque at the center; wonderfully fresh, clean and intense; thyme and cedar; walnut shell, toast and tapenade; black currants and black raspberries, iron and iodine; dense, chewy, dusty, gritty yet pretty suave and supple, background, though, of gravel and tar; gets bigger, denser, deeper, more minerally and spicy; opens the box on black tea and bitter chocolate, fruitcake and sandalwood; leathery tannins, underbrush for the finish. Quite a performance. Now through 2020 to ’23. Excellent. about $30.
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Stone Edge Farm Surround 2009, Sonoma Valley. 14.4% alc. 56% cabernet sauvignon, 44% merlot. 692 cases. Dark ruby-magenta color; intense and concentrated, graphite, lavender and licorice; piercing iodine and iron minerality, a smoke and charcoal edge; very dry, with velvety tannins that coat the palate, dusty graphite and granitic mineral elements; deep spice-drenched black fruit flavors, cedar, tobacco and black tea; long oak-and-tannin-permeated finish. Best from 2015 through 2019 or ’21. Excellent. About $40.
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Almost 50 years after its founding in 1965, on a property purchased in 1862 by Jacob Schram, it has become a cliche that Schramsberg is one of the leading producers of sparkling wine in California and that Jack and Jamie Davies, both deceased, were pioneering visionaries in the field, especially in Napa Valley. Cliche or not, however, under the leadership of Jack and Jamie’s son Hugh — winemaker along with Keith Hock — the Schramsberg winery continues to produce world-class sparkling wine using the champagne method of second fermentation in the bottle. It was a pleasure to taste — nay, drink — these three examples of the Schramsberg line sent to me as review samples. My notes follow. Each of these, or all of them, would make ideal additions to your roster of Yuletide and New Year libations.
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The Schramsberg Blanc de Blancs Brut 2010, North Coast, is made completely from chardonnay grapes — “white from white” — that derive from these North Coast counties: Napa 60 percent, Sonoma 37 percent, Marin 2 percent and Mendocino 1 percent. The color is shimmering pale gold; the effervescence is exuberant and persistent. Notes of roasted lemon and lemon balm are highlighted by quince and ginger, hints of lime peel and grapefruit, freshly baked bread and limestone. This sparkling wine is bright and crisp on the palate, with tingling acidity that buoys a lovely, almost creamy texture that nonetheless is characterized by lithe and lively and slightly angular minerality. The overall effect is of balletic elegance and finely-wrought stones and bones. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2017 to ’18. Excellent. About $38.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ The composition of the Schramberg Blanc de Noirs Brut 2009 — “white from black” — is 87 percent pinot noir and 13 percent chardonnay; the North Coast county components are 34 percent Sonoma, 32 percent Napa, 26 percent Mendocino and 8 percent Marin. Pale gold in color, this sparkling wine features a constant stream of tiny silvery shivery bubbles; the initial impression is clean and fresh, with aromas of slightly macerated strawberries and raspberries, lightly buttered cinnamon toast with cloves and candied orange rind. These elements persist into the flavor profile, where the wine takes on degrees of earthy, flinty minerality and notably crisp acidity, arrayed in a spare, elegant body for a high-toned character. 13 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2019 or ’20. Excellent. About $40.
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Last of this trio is my favorite, the Schramsberg Brut Rosé 2009, a blend of 70 percent pinot noir and 30 percent chardonnay, with North Coast contributions of 44 percent Sonoma, 28 percent Napa, 24 percent Mendocino and 4 percent Marin counties. The color is old rose-gold enlivened by an upward surge of tiny glinting bubbles. Aromas of dried red currants and raspberries carry hints of peach, orange rind and a touch of tropical fruit, all enveloped in limestone; a few minutes in the glass add notes of pomegranate and biscuits. This sparkling wine is juicy but very dry, a tissue of delicate nuance, spare and elegant, wrapped in a fleet-footed expression of bright acidity and scintillating limestone minerality; its elegance does not belie a sense of tautness and urgency. A beautifully-wrought brut rosé. 13 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018 or ’19. Excellent. About $43.
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Belle Glos is the pinot noir arm of the Wagner Family of Wines that includes the iconic Caymus cabernet sauvignons and the popular Conundrum white and red blends (yes, there’s a red now). The Meiomi label represents the more moderately priced and accessible pinot noir from the Belle Glos line. Winemaker is Joseph J. Wagner. Meiomi means “coast” in the languages of the Wappo and Yuki tribes that once thrived in California, and the wine is indeed a coastal product, derived from vineyards in three coastal counties, Monterey, Santa Barbara and Sonoma. (Though I have to say that every time I see a bottle of this wine I think, “Me-oh-my!”) The color of the Meiomi Pinot Noir 2012 is dark ruby with a tinge of magenta; the wine generally is dark, spicy, berryish, with heady aromas of black and red cherries and currants and plums touched with cranberries and cloves and a hint of sassafras. It’s super satiny on the palate, and its ripe and spicy black and red fruit flavors are permeated by smoke and leather that lead out to a keen graphite edge, all set midst moderately dense, dry and slightly dusty tannins. At 13.8 percent alcohol and with this panoply of effects, it’s a stylish crowd-pleaser. Now through 2016. Excellent. About $22.

A sample for review.

This post started as the Weekend Wines Notes on Friday, but if you follow me on Facebook, you know that this was a weekend of dog rescuing and transporting, so I was not able to finish until this morning. So be it.

First, allow me to mention that zinfandel is not “the all-American grape” that some writers still inexplicably assert, mainly in popular magazines. It’s a European vinifera grape just like cabernet sauvignon, merlot, pinot noir, chardonnay, riesling and so on. Second, while capable of being made into fine wine indeed, zinfandel has the problem of being too versatile, that is, it can be made into a confusing array of styles so that consumers don’t know what they’re getting when they choose a bottle at their favorite retail store, but that’s why knowledgeable sales clerks exist, n’est-ce pas? In today’s edition of Weekend Wine Notes, I look at products from three producers that focus on zinfandel; in the case of two of these, McCay Cellars and Wine Guerrilla, the wines are designated single-vineyard. One style of zinfandel is full-throttle, super-ripe, dense and alcoholic; that’s the style favored by Wine Guerrilla winemaker Bruce Patch. It’s not my favorite manner — I think it distorts the grape’s character and results in undrinkable wines — and that stance is reflected in the reviews that follow. I liked three of Patch’s 2009s better, and I admire him for working with these historic old vine field blend vineyards; here are the more positive reviews. These wines were review samples. Unfortunately, label images for McCay’s recent releases don’t exist; at least I couldn’t find any.
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McCay Cellars Equity Vineyard Zinfandel 2010, Lodi. 14.4% alc. 288 cases. Dark ruby color, tinge of mulberry; intense and concentrated, graphite and briers, black currants, blackberries and plums, licorice and lavender; sleek and polished but dry; vibrant acidity plows through the center; loads of dusty tannins and oak; notes of cloves, sandalwood, fruitcake, hint of pomegranate; dense and chewy, a real mouthful of wine that flows beautifully on the palate. Try from 2015 through 2018 to ’20. Excellent. About $32.
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McCay Cellars TruLux Vineyard Zinfandel 2010, Lodi. 14.4% alc. 278 cases. Slightly darker and more intense ruby color than the previous example; iodine, iron and graphite; fruit and floral elements both fresh and dried; black currants, blackberry and blueberry; potpourri, bitter chocolate, heaps of briers, brambles and underbrush; very intense and concentrated, even brooding, but quite vibrant and resonant; finish is packed with granitic minerality, dusty tannins and dried spices. Try from 2015 or ’16 through 2019 or ’20. Excellent. About $32.
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McCay Cellars Jupiter Vineyard Zinfandel 2010, Lodi. 14.6% alc. 449 cases. Dark ruby color with a touch of magenta; intense minerality yet warm and spicy; very dry dusty grainy tannins and oak sanding the circumference, but zinging acidity adds liveliness; a dense, deeply spicy and dusty graphite propelled zinfandel that needs a year or two; presently a bit inexpressive. Try from 2015 or ’16 to 2020 or ’21. Very Good+. About $28.
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McCay Cellars Contention Vineyard Zinfandel 2010, Lodi. 14.9% alc. 223 cases. Dense dark ruby-purple color; spiced and macerated blackberries, black raspberries and plums, rather fleshy and meaty; iron and iodine; a very intense and savory core of potpourri, lavender, fruitcake, bitter chocolate and graphite; a huge mouthful of wine with austere tannin-oak-and-mineral-infused finish. Try from 2015 or ’16 to 2020 or ’22. Very Good+ with Excellent potential. About $64.
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Renwood Zinfandel 2011, California. 14.5% alc. 86% zinfandel, 10% primitivo, 2% roussanne, 1% each mourvedre and souzao. Bright medium ruby color; black currants, plums and blueberries with a touch of red raspberry; briers and brambles, intriguing hints of mocha and cherry cola; shapely and moderate tannins. A tasty zinfandel. Now through 2014. Very Good+. About $15, representing Good Value.
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Renwood Premier Old Vine Zinfandel 2010, Amador County. 15.5% alc. 92.5% zinfandel, 5.8% syrah, 1.7% souzao. Medium ruby color; spiced , macerated, roasted and fleshy; bristly black and red currants, a rasp of raspberries and rose hips; fresh and clean but with the dried spice, espresso bean and fruitcake note of old vines; finish is fairly austere and somewhat unbalanced with a touch of alcoholic heat and sweetness. Drink through 2015. Very Good. About $20.
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Renwood Fiddletown Zinfandel 2011, Amador County. 14.8% alc. 99% zinfandel, 1% mission grapes. Lovely medium ruby color, slightly lighter at the rim; red and black currants, red and black cherries, notes of blueberries; briers and underbrush elements, violets and tobacco leaf, cloves, mocha and a beguiling hint of pomegranate; very satisfying balance and integration; dusty graphite and tannins, a dry but not austere or forbidding red wine, perfect for Thanksgiving dinner. Now through 2015. Excellent. About $25.
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Wine Guerrilla McClain Vineyard Zinfandel 2011, Alexander Valley, Sonoma County. 14.5% alc. 80% zinfandel, 20% petite sirah. Dark ruby-purple color; very ripe boysenberry, blueberry, blackberry, with iodine, mint and graphite, smoke, lavender, violets; juicy blue and black fruit flavors permeated by dusty granitic minerality and tart acidity, all set in a structure of powerful tannins; a not pleasing sensation of a dry red wine that feels sweet; will a few years tone down the effect? Good. About $35.
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Wine Guerrilla Clopton Vineyard Old Vine Zinfandel 2011, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. 14.5% alc. A field blend of zinfandel, palomino and alicante bouschet. Dark ruby-purple color; blackberry, blueberry tart, super-ripe sweet fruit packed with cloves, allspice, sandalwood and hints of rhubarb and beetroot and loam; big, dense and powerful, relentlessly dry yet almost cloying with sweet ripeness so the balance feels off; will a few years bring coherence? Good. About $40.
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Wine Guerrilla Carreras Ranch Block 2 Old Vine Zinfandel 2011, Dry Creek Valley, Sonoma County. 14.5% alc. A field blend of zinfandel, petite sirah, Napa gamay, alicante bouschet, chasselas dore. Dark ruby-purple, almost opaque; deep, rooty, loamy and earthy; smoke, leather, briers and brambles; intense and concentrated, very dry, dusty and minerally; dense, almost viscous, has the dignity and power of old vines — these planted in 1916 — as well as the intensity and concentration. Now through 2019 to ’20. Excellent. About $40.
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WG Sonoma Monte Rosso Vineyard Block E44 Zinfandel 2010, Sonoma Valley. 15% alc. 200 cases. Very dark ruby-purple color; smoke, plums and blueberry tart; heady notes of cloves and sandalwood, violets and lavender; deeply earthy and mineral-laden in the graphite and granite range; stout, dusty leathery tannins; feel some heat on the finish; next morning, quite dense, austere, almost astringent oak and tannin influence; will the fruit survive? Not recommended except for those who want to take a chance. About $35.
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Wine Guerrilla Conte Vineyard Zinfandel 2010, Russian River Valley. 15.6% alc. 120 cases. 85% zinfandel, 10% petite sirah, the rest grenache and carignane. Deep ruby color with a magenta rim shading to garnet; very ripe, stridently spicy; boysenberry and blackberry tart; sweetish alcohol; both super-ripe and austere; uncoordinated and unbalanced. Not recommended. About $30.
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