California


Maggy Hawk is an interesting name for a winery. It comes from the name of a racehorse owned by Barbara Banke, chairman and proprietor maggyof Jackson Family Wines and widow of Jess Jackson, the founder of it all who died in 2011. The property lies in the remote “deep end” of Mendocino County’s Anderson Valley and is one of this sub-AVA’s closest vineyards to the Pacific Ocean. The property encompasses 57 acres, much of it in redwood forest, with 22.55 acres planted to vines. That acreage is divided among five vineyards, planted in 2000, that vary in size from a tiny 1.23 acres to a relatively expansive 10.03 acres. These five vineyards are named for off-spring of Maggy Hawk: Jolie, Unforgettable, Stormin’, Hawkster and Afleet, the latter a Belmont Stakes and Preakness winner. Maggy Hawk is one of the wineries that JFW counts among its Spire Collection of elite estates, though nothing fancy or luxurious there draws the Grant-Douglasvisitor. This is a place where vines, grapes and winemaking prevail over tasting rooms, winemaker dinners, tourism and wedding events. Winemaker is Elizabeth Grant-Douglas, pictured here, also the director of winemaking at La Crema, another JFW property, acquired by Jess Jackson in 1993. The soil on this hillside, where the elevation varies from 300 to 500 feet, is decomposed sandstone, offering little nutrition for the vines but terrific drainage, an ideal situation for growing excellent grapes. Morning fog, combined with warm afternoons and a wide diurnal swing in temperature, also provide salubrious conditions.

I tasted the 2012 versions of Jolie, Stormin’, Hawkster and Afleet — Unforgettable was not made in 2012 — back in March with Grant-Douglas at lunch in Sonoma and this month at home with review samples. It was interesting to observe that eight months built some weight into the now three-year-old wines as well as adding to their layering of fruit, flowers, spice and minerality. These are serious pinot noirs, thrilling to taste and drink, each a projection of the wine’s roots in the earth of a specific site. They should drink beautifully until 2020 or so.
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Maggy Hawk “Hawkster” Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley. This wine aged 14 months in French oak, 63 percent new barrels. The grapes derive from the estate’s Blocks 12, 13 and 14, adding up to 6.18 acres. The color is an uplifting transparent medium ruby hue; the complex layering of fruit, spice and minerals is beautifully knit and evocative, with notes of red and black currants, a hint of red cherry and touches of cranberry and pomegranate. Back in March, I wrote in my book that “Hawkster” was “the most spare — most slender in frame” of this quartet, though seven months have filled it out nicely, but, damn, it feels light as a feather while being supple and satiny and delivering a definite graphite-loamy edge. Sweet cherry fruit laden with cloves and smoke, briers and brambles slide across the palate with delicacy and nuance, while subtly dusty tannins and keen acidity provide support and staying power. Alcohol content is 14.5 percent. Production was 268 cases. Drink now through 2019 to 2022. Excellent. About $66.
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Maggy Hawk “Jolie” Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley. This wine comes from the steep slopes of 10.03-acre Block 7, by far the largest on the property; it aged 14 months in French oak, 64 percent new barrels. Here’s my impression from back in March: “Cloves and sassafras — spiced and slightly macerated cherries & currants — lovely fruit, loamy quality — spare, with a streak of vivid acidity.” This month, I would say: Fairly dark ruby shading to a lighter magenta rim; dominant elements of ripe black and red cherries and currants are permeated by notes of cranberries, pomegranate and cloves — there’s that consistency — though this is a more full-bodied wine than its cousins, but while it flirts with a lush texture, it pulls up plenty of graphite minerality and dry tannins, and exercises power that comes close to being muscular and sinewy. On the palate, it’s characterized by deeply spicy black and red fruit flavors and electric acidity. Alcohol content is 14.5 percent. Production was 312 cases. Drink now through 2020 to 2023. Excellent. About $66.
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Maggy Hawk “Afleet” Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley. Afleet, the smallest production of this pinot noirs from 2012, comes from the Maggy Hawk estate’s Block 4 vineyard, measuring only 1.23 acres; it aged in French oak for 14 months, 43 percent new barrels. Seven months put a little weight and depth on this wine from when I tasted it in March. Initially, I was impressed with its spareness and elegance, as well as its dusty, loamy quality and its smoky, spicy cherry and plum fruit. Presently, I was taken by a beautiful transparent medium ruby color; by its notes of red and black currants and cherries permeated by hints of cloves and pomegranate; by its deep, dark, spicy rooty character and its foundation in the earth, because this Afleet is a pinot noir that feels as if it’s still drawing nourishment from the soil and bedrock of the vineyard. The texture is almost powdery graphite and talc-like elements, though energized by (ahem) fleet acidity. Alcohol content is 14.5 percent. Production was 156 cases. Drink now through 2022 to 2024. Exceptional. About $66.
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Maggy Hawk “Stormin'” Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley. This Stormin’ pinot noir saw the least new oak of this foursome, meaning 41 percent, aging for the standard 14 months; the grapes derived from the estate’s 3.47-acre Block 6 vineyard, adjacent to the Jolie Block 7. Despite its lovely transparent medium ruby-magenta hue, almost an expression of lustrous fragility, the wine seethes with elements of leather and loam, with wild and briery red and black currant and cherry scents and flavors, and an array of domestic and exotic spices ranging from cloves and sassafras to allspice and sandalwood. Mainly, though, this is a resolutely vibrant and structured wine that reveals remarkable purity and intensity of the grape and its feeling for a patch of land; a few minutes in the glass bring out more delicate touches of violets and lilac and hints of tobacco and bitter chocolate. 14.5 percent alcohol. Production was 223 cases. Drink now through 2019 to 2022. Excellent. About $66.
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Let’s get right to it. You should buy the Louis M. Martini Cabernet Sauvignon 2013, Sonoma County, by the case for drinking over the martini cabnext three or four years, in the Summer with grilled steak, pork chops and barbecue, in Winter with braised short ribs, hearty pasta dishes, burgers and pizzas. Or anytime, all year-round. Made primarily from cabernet sauvignon grapes, with dollops of merlot and petite sirah, the wine derives from vineyards in Dry Creek Valley and Alexander Valley. It aged an unspecified amount of time in French and American oak barrels, a deviation from the philosophy of founder Louis M. Martini, who eschewed the use of any kind of oak in favor of 1,500-gallon redwood vats, employed by his son and grandson until 1989. Anyway, the color is opaque ruby-purple with a magenta rim; this is really classic Sonoma County cabernet that displays riveting aromas of ripe black currants and cherries with notes of cloves and graphite, cedar and rosemary and touches of smoke and sage. Dense and supple, this exuberant wine is supported by dusty, graphite-laden tannins and bright acidity, filling the mouth with lively black and blue fruit flavors leading to a mineral-packed finish that opens to nuances of lead pencil, black olive and bay leaf. Alcohol content is an eminently sensible 13.8 percent. Drink now through 2018 or ’19. Excellent. About $20, representing Great Value.

A sample for review. The winery has been owned by E.&J. Gallo since 2002.

I see by this morning’s weather map that most parts of the country, except for the desert Southwest, are experiencing radical (but expected) dips in temperature, and, in fact, the first frosts and snows of the season are occurring in the Upper Midwest and New VR_Label_12_Petite_Sirah_FrontEngland. Seems to me that what you’re looking for is a robust red wine to accompany the robust fare you’re doubtless cooking this week and for several months to come. I’m speaking of braised shanks of various animals, braised short ribs, hearty soups and stews and such, the sort of food that fills kitchens with redolent meaty, saucy, winy aromas. Here, then, is a prime example of this sort of wine. The Vina Robles Estate Petite Sirah 2012, Paso Robles, derives from three of the winery’s five estate vineyards. It ages a total of 20 months in oak barrels, mainly French but also American and Hungarian. I say “a total of 20 months” because the component parts age separately for eight months, and then the wine made from the blend of the vineyards ages for a year. The winery was founded in 1996 by Swiss entrepreneur Hans Nef; winemaker is Kevin Willenborg.

The Vina Robles Estate Petite Sirah 2012 offers an opaque purple-black hue that shades to a glowing magenta rim; notes of blackberries, blueberries and plums are steeped in leather and black pepper, graphite, lavender and bitter chocolate. Bold, shaggy, dusty tannins with elements of briers and brambles provide structure for very spicy flavors of roasted black and blue fruit, everything kept from being ponderous by bright acidity and a keen granitic edge. The finish is packed with spiced black tea, minerals and touches of tar and burnished oak. Alcohol content is a manageable 14.3 percent. Drink now through 2018 to 2020. Nothing elegant, subtle or nuanced here, but that’s not what we want when we’re cozying up to a slow-cooked pork shank. Excellent. About $29.

A sample for review.

The word “interesting,” of course, is a double-edged sword, as when one says that someone’s boyfriend or girlfriend is interesting, meaning “What a dork!” No, I don’t mean that! I mean interesting as “of real interest to My Readers” and white wines to look out for as alternatives to chardonnay, sauvignon blanc and riesling. Not that there’s anything wrong with those grapes — well, chardonnay is too often over-made and fiddled with — and I’m distinctly fond of sauvignon blanc and especially reisling. Many more types of white wine exist, however, and it’s in that less-traveled direction that I send My Readers today. We touch many countries and regions and a variety of grapes, both single and in fascinating and somewhat exotic blends. Look particularly at the wines priced between $11 and $17; real bargains abound there. As usual, I avoid lengthy mentions of technical, historical and geographical information in this Weekend Wine Notes — though I dote on that sort of material — for the sake of quick, incisive reviews deigned to pique your, ahem, interest and whet your palates. Enjoy!

These wines were either samples for review or encountered at wholesaler trade events.
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scaia-garganega
Tenuta Sant’Antonio Scaia Bianca 2014, Delle Venezia IGT, Italy. 12% alc. 55% garganega, 45% chardonnay, according to the label; website and printed material say 50% garganega, 30% chardonnay, 20% trebbiano Soave. Medium straw-gold color; ripe, lively, crisp, bristly; brimming with notes of green apple and melon, lemon and peach; a few minutes in the glass bring in hints of jasmine and gardenia, lime peel and grapefruit; very dry, zings and sings across the palate with bright acidity and tantalizing limestone elements; heaps of personality. Excellent. About $11, a Raving Amazing Bargain.
Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif.
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villa-wolf-2012-pinot-grigio-gris-gris-pfalz
Villa Wolf Pinot Gris 2012, Pfalz, Germany. 13% alc. 100% pinot gris grapes. Medium burnished gold hue; straw, melon and orange rind; lemongrass and ginger, jasmine and honeysuckle; saline and savory, a touch exotic in its ripe, spicy yellow fruit and yellow flower elements; quite dry, with clean acidity and a sense of fading limestone and flint minerality; quite attractive, but drink up. Very Good +. About $12, representing Real Value.
Loosen Bros. USA, Salem, Oregon.
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Alamos Torrontés 2014, Salta, Argentina. 13% alc. 100% torrontés grapes. Pale straw color; jasmine and gardenia, very lemony, hints of lemongrass and figs, honeydew and greengage; a little musky; saline briskness and crisp acidity; lovely, lively silken texture. Very Good+. About $13.
Alamos USA, Haywood, Calif.
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Les Vignes de Bila-Haut 2014, Côtes du Roussillon, France (Michael Chapoutier). 13% alc. Grenache gris, grenache blanc, macabeu (or sometimes maccabeu). Pale straw-gold color; ripe and fleshy, apple peel and peach skin; lemon, lime peel, tangerine and yellow plum; cloves and a wisp of dried thyme; crisp and sassy, very spicy and quite dry but with spare and tasty stone-fruit flavors. Very Good+. About $13.
An R. Shack Selection, HB Wine Merchants, New York.
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pecorino
La Valentina Pecorino 2014, Bianco Colline Piscarese, Italy. NA% alc. 100% pecorino grapes. Pale gold hue; very fresh, clean and appealing; lemon balm, lime peel, almond skin and almond blossom; limestone and oyster shell, savory with a salt marsh-sea breeze edge of vitality; pert and lively, a burgeoning of stone-fruit and meadowy herbs; extremely charming but with a thread of seriousness. Very Good+. About $16.
Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa Calif.
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Vina Robles “White 4” 2014, Paso Robles, California. 14.9% alc. 54% viognier, 22% vermentino, 15% verdelho, 9% sauvignon blanc. Pale straw color with faint green highlights; delicate, lightly spicy, a slight sense of sunny, leafy figs and briers; all citrus with a flush of stone-fruit; a few minutes in the glass bring in heady notes of lilac and Evening in Paris; very appealing, with a beautiful texture and structure that fill the mouth with almost powdery talc-like elements cut by bright acidity. Drink now through 2017. Excellent. About $16.
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alleme
Bodega de Txakoli Tadai Berri Alleme Txakolina 2014, Getariako Txakolina. NA% alc. 100% hondarribi zuri grapes. The wine is pronounced chakoli; txakolina means “the txakoli.” The hondarribi zuri grape is primarily grown, where it is cultivated at all, in Spain’s Basque country. Very pale straw color; just faintly effervescent, as a sort of quiet, persistent tickle; white flowers and yellow fruit, let’s say, gardenia, peach and yellow plums, all quite gently expressed, with hints of almond blossom and lychee; lively, crisp, clean, caressing. Drink up as a very pleasant and unusual aperitif; these wines are not meant to last. Very Good+. About $17.
Kysela Pere et Fils, Winchester, Va.
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ponzi pb
Ponzi Vineyards Pinot Blanc 2014, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 13.4% alc. 1,000 cases. 100% pinot blanc grapes. Very pale straw-gold hue; roasted lemons and spiced pears, notes of quince, nectarine and ginger; subtly floral, like some tiny white slightly astringent flower; mountainy and meadowy; incisive acidity with elements of steel and limestone and a haze of smoke and talc; quite dry but immensely appealing and satisfying. Excellent. About $20, representing Great Value.
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amity-vineyards-pinot-blanc-2013-bottle
Amity Vineyards Pinot Blanc 2013, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 13% alc. 181 cases. 100% pinot blanc. Medium straw-gold hue; lemon balm, lime peel, slightly caramelized grapefruit; intriguing notes of cedar and hay; a fresh, breezy and bracing wine, lovely purity and intensity; hints of quince, peach skin and ginger; lithe and supple on the palate with crystalline acidity and vibrant limestone minerality. Now through 2016. Excellent. About $22.
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mccay viognier
McCay Cellars Viognier 2014, Lodi, California. 14.1% alc. 100% viognier grapes. Very pale gold color; peach, roasted lemon and lavender; slightly honeyed, with notes of beeswax, dried thyme and rosemary, with the latter’s hint of resiny quality; very clean, pure and intense, lovely presence and weight; more on the graceful, spare and elegant side of the grape, though a hint of caramelized fennel lends something exotic; a lingering finish that turns a bit austere with limestone and flint minerality. Now through 2018 to 2020. Excellent. About $24.
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Clos le Vigneau 2013, Vouvray, Loire Valley, France. (Alexandre Monmousseau). NA%alc. 100% chenin blanc grapes. Bright straw-gold hue; vouvrayhay, damp stones, jasmine; hazelnuts and almond skin; notes of peach, apricot and yellow plums; lean and lithe, chiseled limestone minerality and chiming acidity yet a soft approachable texture; a hint of sweetness on the entry but very dry from mid-palate back through the spice and mineral freighted finish. Now through 2018 to 2020. Excellent. About $19.
Kysela Pere et Fils, Winchester, Va.
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anaba white
Anaba Wines Turbine White 2013, Sonoma Valley, California. 14% alc. 42% roussanne, 20% grenache blanc, 20% picpoul blanc, 18% marsanne. 354 cases. Shimmering pale gold hue; roasted lemon, dried thyme, beeswax, lanolin, lilac; notes of heather and peach and a hint of some exotic floral and pressed nut oil; bountifully presents a full-bodied, seductive texture packed with spiced and roasted peach and apricot flavors but balanced by riveting acidity and an element of damp-stone minerality. Super appealing, practically glitters in the glass. Excellent. About $28, and Worth a Search.
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clayhouse cab
My Weekend Wine Notes post on Saturday featured red wines suitable for drinking with simple hearty fare like pizza, burgers, spaghetti and meatballs and such priced from $10 to $17. Let’s move up the scale one dollar and talk about the Clayhouse Cabernet Sauvignon 2013, Paso Robles, derived 100 percent from the estate’s certified-sustainable Red Cedar Vineyard. The color is deep ruby-purple with an opaque motor-oil like center and a magenta rim. Seductive aromas of licorice and lavender, spiced and macerated black currants, blueberries and plums are infused with notes of pungent graphite, fruit cake, boysenberry and bitter chocolate. Dense and chewy on the palate, yet sleek and chiseled, this cabernet sauvignon — a blend of 87 percent cabernet, 11 percent petit verdot, 2 percent malbec — aged 10 months in French and American oak barrels, a process that lent spice to the flavors and suppleness to the texture. It’s a dry, lively wine, sporting dusty and fairly austere tannins to balance the succulence of its ripe, cedary black and blue fruit flavors. Just writing this paragraph makes me long for a medium-rare ribeye steak, hot and crusty from the cast-iron skillet. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018 or ’19. Very Good+. About $18.

A sample for review.

Here we go, nine red wines entirely fit for drinking with such fare as pizza, hamburgers, lasagna, spaghetti and meat balls, hearty sandwiches and so forth. These reviews are brisk, brief, incisive — forgoing technical, historical and geographical detail for the sake of immediacy. All these wines were samples for review or were tasted at a wholesaler’s trade event. Enjoy! ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Illuminate-2012RedBlend_NorthCoast-frontIlluminate Red Blend 2012, North Coast. 13.9% alc. 95% merlot, dollops of cabernet franc, malbec and petit verdot. (A second label of Kimmel Vineyards) Red and black berries with a touch of roasted plum; smoke, cedar and tobacco, hint of black olive; pleasing heft, lively and appealing; slightly slappy and sappy tannins, soft and dusty. For enjoyable, quaffable drinking. Very Good. About — ready for this? — $10, so Buy by the Case.
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neprica
Tormaresca Neprica 2011, Pulgia. 13.5% alc. 40% negroamaro, 30% primitivo, 30% cabernet sauvignon. (Tormaresca is Antinori’s outpost in Puglia.) Very deep ruby-purple; very dark and spicy red and black berry notes, permeated by dust and graphite, tar and oolong tea with hints of licorice, lavender and leather; robust and rustic in the best way, bristly, briery and juicy; lively acidity and chewy tannins in a dense but polished package. Tremendous personality for the price. Very Good+. About $11 (and often discounted around the country), marking Terrific Value.
Imported by Ste. Michelle Wine Estates, Woodinville, Washington
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gnarly head
Gnarly Head “1924” Double Black 2013, California. 15% alc. Zinfandel, merlot, syrah. A “limited edition” wine though number of cases is unspecified. (A label of Delicato Family Vineyards) Inky purple-black with a magenta rim; nothing subtle here but a strapping, muscular and juicy number, with ripe, spiced and macerated blackberry, blueberry and loganberry scents and flavors; briery and brambly, graphite and violets, bitter chocolate; pert and lively acidity, a core of mocha, lavender and velvety tannins; both concentrated and generous. Very Good+. About $12, Real Value.
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Castelmaure Col des Vents 2014, Corbières, France. 13.5% alc. 50% carignan, 35% grenache, 15% syrah. Always a favorite. Medium ruby color; thyme and sage, spiced and macerated blackberries and currants and a hint of blueberries; juicy, tasty, lively; a note of graphite minerality over moderately dusty, slightly rustic tannins. Very Good+. About $12, a Great Bargain.
Imported by Kysela Pere et Fils, Winchester, Va.
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Charles Thomas Côtes-du-Rhône Rouge 2013, Côtes-du-Rhône, France. 13.5% alc. (From Maison Jean-Baptiste Bejot) 50% syrah, 40% grenache, 10% mourvedre. Vibrant dark ruby hue; lovely evocation of the southern Rhone: lavender, cloves, leather, sage; blackberries, currants and plums; a few minutes bring in hints of lavender and licorice; well-developed, ripe and spicy black fruit flavors bolstered by graphite, bright acidity and slightly chewy, medium-impact tannins. Very Good+. About $12, Amazing for the Price.
Imported by Kysela Pere et Fils, Winchester, Va.
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valentina
La Valentina 2012, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, Italy. 13% alc. 100% Montepulciano d’Abruzzo. Dark ruby-purple hue with a violet rim; red currants and raspberries with a nod toward black currants and blueberries; cloves, lavender and black pepper, sage and briers; brisk acidity and bright red and blue fruit flavors buoyed by moderately plush, dusty tannins; a robust finish, packed with spice, dried flowers and graphite. Very Good+. About $14, Excellent Value.
Imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif.
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segries
Chateau de Ségriès Côtes-du-Rhône 2013, Côtes-du-Rhône, France. 14% alc. 50% grenache, 30% syrah, 10% each cinsault and carignan. Talk about an over-achiever! Dark ruby hue, tinge of violet at the rim; mint, smoke, leather and a touch of iodine; blackberries, black and red currants and plums; violets and lavender; lithe and supple texture, flows deliciously across the palate, but tannins feel burnished and slightly roughened, as though polished with fine sandpaper; a finish packed with spice and granitic minerality. Drink now through 2018 or 2020. Excellent. About $15, an Unbeatable Bargain.
Imported by Kysela Pere et Fils, Winchester, Va.
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hito
Cepa 21 Hito 2014, Ribera del Duero, Spain. 14.5% alc. 100% tempranillo. Dark ruby with a violet-magenta rim; an inky, savory and saline tempranillo, with notes of lavender and graphite, leather and lilac, black cherries, currants and plums, all smoldering in the glass; a few minutes unfold hints of iodine and mint; cozy and cushiony tannins have a lithic-briery bite; clean acidity runs through it, lending energy and verve; the ripe, dusty black fruit flavors persist through a dense, slightly austere finish. Lots of presence for the price. Now through 2019 to 2021. Excellent. About $16.
Imported by Moro Brothers Inc., New York
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hess treo
Hess Select Winemaker’s Blend 2012, California. 13.8% alc. 38% petite sirah, 29% syrah, 22% zinfandel, 11% merlot. Dark ruby hue, faintly purple; and then if “purple” had a smell and taste: inky but not brooding, spiced and macerated black and red currents, red raspberries and a hint of mulberry, all infused with cloves, graphite and lavender; robust but more sleek than rustic, vibrant acidity to keep your taste-buds wanting more; non-threatening tannins frame it nicely along granitic lines. Now through 2016 into 2017. Very Good+. About $17.
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Do I have to defend the right or necessity to drink rosé wines all year around? Do I have to man the barricades, go to the wall, belly up to the bar to convince nay-sayers that a shimmering, scintillating, beautiful rosé wine — dry, vibrant, fruity, subtle: not sweet — is appropriate in every month and season? If I have to do that, then my case may be hopeless, as far as the die-hard opposition goes, but those who have followed this blog for a considerable period will require no further persuasion, gentle or not. A clean dry rosé may serve as a refreshing aperitif in December as well as June, and few wines go better with fried chicken, for example, or various terrines or the egg-based dishes that front the sideboard for big family breakfasts during the upcoming holidays. Thanksgiving dinner itself is a good test for rosé wines. No, friends, do not neglect the rosé genre, from which I offer 10 models today. The Weekend Wine Notes eschew detailed technical, historical and geographical data (which we all adore) for the sake of incisive reviews ripped, almost, from the very pages of my notebooks, though arranged in more shapely fashion. These eclectic wines were samples for review. Enjoy!
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billa haut
Bila-Haut Rosé 2014, Pays d’Oc (from M. Chapoutier). NA% alc. Grenache and cinsault. Pale copper-salmon hue; orange zest, strawberries and raspberries; a pleasing heft of limestone minerality with cutting acidity; juicy and thirst-quenching, but dry as sun-baked stones; a finish delicately etched with chalk and dried thyme. Very Good+. About $14.
An R. Shack Selection, HB Wine Merchants, New York.
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blair rose
Blair Vineyards Delfina’s Vineyard Rosé of Pinot Noir 2014, Arroyo Seco. 13.3% alc. 117 cases. Bright peach-copper color; ripe strawberries macerated with cloves, raspberries, hints of tomato skin and pomegranate; paradoxically and deftly fleshy and juicy while being quite crisp and dry and tightly tuned with limestone and flint. A superior rosé. Excellent. About $22.
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Bonny Doon Vin Gris de Cigare 2014, Central Coast. 13% alc. 35% grenache, 18% mourvedre, 16% grenache blanc, 12.5% roussanne, 8% carignane, 8% cinsault, 1.5% marsanne, 1% counoise. Very pale onion skin hue with a topaz glow; quite delicate, almost fragile; dried strawberries and raspberries with a touch of peach and hints of lavender and orange rind; gently dusty and minerally, like rain-water drying on a warm stone; a note of sage in the finish. Elegantly ravishing. Excellent. About $18.
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bridge lane
Bridge Lane Rosé 2014, New York State (from Lieb Cellars). 11.9% alc. Cabernet franc 63%, merlot 21%, pinot blanc 8%, riesling 5%, gewurztraminer 3%. Ethereal pale peach-copper color; delicate notes of peach, strawberry and raspberry with a touch of watermelon and spiced pear; a hint of minerality subtle as a river-stone polished with talc; incisive acidity for liveliness; develops more floral elements as the moments pass: lavender, rose petal, violets, all beautifully knit. Excellent. About $18.
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heintz rose
Charles Heintz Vineyards Rosé of Pinot Noir 2014, Sonoma Coast. 13.5% alc. 250 cases. Beautiful salmon scale-light copper hue; blood orange, tomato skin, strawberries and raspberries, hints of violets and lilac, a note of cloves and damp limestone; red fruit on the palate with an undertone of peach; quite dry and crisp, lithe on the palate, but with appealing red fruit character and an element of stone-fruit and chalk-flint minerality. A gorgeous rosé. Excellent. About $19.
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cornerstone corallina
Cornerstone Stepping Stone Corallina Rosé 2014, Napa Valley. 13.1% alc. 100% syrah. Very pretty pink coral color; strawberries and raspberries, hint of pomegranate and a fascinating note of spiced tea and apple peel compote; a few minutes in the glass bring in touches of tomato aspic and red currants; full-bodied for a rose, with a texture that would be almost lush save for the bristling acidity that keeps the whole package energized. Drink through 2016. Excellent. About $18.
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Crossbarn Rosé of Pinot Noir 2014, Sonoma Coast (from Paul Hobbs). 12.5% alc. Pale copper-salmon color; intriguing musky-spicy note, crossbarn roselike rose hips, camellias, pomegranate, cloves and sandalwood macerated together; strawberries and orange rind; hints of pink grapefruit and peach; lively and crisp, with a chalk and flint edge to the supple texture; gains a fleshy and florid character on the finish. Very Good+. About $18
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loomis air
Loomis Family “Air” Rosé Wine 2013, Napa Valley. 12% alc. 41% grenache 36% mourvedre 13% counoise 10% syrah. 125 cases. Light copper-salmon hue; dried strawberries and raspberries, notes of lavender and red cherry; hints of watermelon and cloves; incisive acidity and limestone minerality bolster juicy red fruit flavors and an elegant and supple texture that retains a crisp chiseled character; a fillip of grapefruit rind and lemongrass provide interest on the finish. Drink through 2016. Excellent. About $18.
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cipressato
Santa Cristina Cipresseto Rosato 2014, Toscano IGT. 11% alc. Sangiovese, cabernet sauvignon, merlot, syrah. (An Antinori brand since 1946.) Light pink-peach color; delicately floral and spicy, notes of raspberries and red currants and a hint of dried thyme and heather; clean acidity and limestone minerality offer gentle ballast for tasty but spare red fruit flavors. Very Good+. About $14.
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stinson rose
Stinson Vineyards Rosé 2014, Monticello, Va. 13% alc. 100% mouvèdre. 175 cases. Classic onion skin hue with a tinge of darker copper; pink grapefruit, rose petals, cloves; raspberries and strawberries delicately strung on a line of limestone minerality and bright acidity; from mid-palate back notes of cranberry, pomegranate and grapefruit rind leading to a tart finish; lovely balance and integrity. Excellent. About $19.
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Readers, today’s Wine of the Day — after somewhat of an unintended hiatus — is not a great wine, but it is a great value. The rocks“Rocks!” label comes from Cornerstone Cellars, preeminently a producer of high-toned and powerful Napa Valley cabernet sauvignon wines as well as a second label, Stepping Stone, for a wider range of less expensive products. Rocks! is the bargain tier, offering now a white, a red and a rosé. Let’s look at the Rocks! White Wine 2014, California, a secret blend of chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, viognier and orange muscat. The latter two grapes don’t require a high percentage of physical presence to make an impact, and you feel them in the wine’s aura of honeysuckle, honeydew melon, bee’s-wax, spiced pear and fig and in the element of sweetness that’s fortunately balanced on the palate by a spine of clean bracing acidity. The wine offers notes of freshly mowed hay and lemongrass with fillips of lime peel and kumquat (with that peculiar bitter sharply citrus quality), while the finish is quite dry and accented by a savory and saline hit of cloves, grapefruit and limestone. The alcohol content is 12.5 percent. Drink up. Served quite chilled with fairly spicy Thai food, grilled shrimp or chicken salad. Very Good+. About $15.

A sample for review.

You know how we wine taster-writer-bloggers are, always scurrying around trying to find cool, excellent expressive wines that nobody has ever heard of, so we say recommend as Wine of the Day or whatever some product fashioned from a totally obscure grape by an 2014-Fume_304x773ancient family in an isolated valley in the foothills of an undiscovered mountain range in eastern France where normally grapes aren’t even grown and 100 cases are imported by a company in Minnesota with no national distribution and we can say: “Definitely Worth a Search!” And it costs $85 a bottle. Well, today I’m not doing that. In fact, I’m recommending a wine that is so well-known and widely available and so ubiquitous on restaurant wine lists of a certain order that you may fall down laughing, so boo-hoo-hoo to you. The wine is the Ferrari-Carano Fumé Blanc 2014, Sonoma County, produced in the amount of 85,000 cases and as tasty and reliable a sauvignon blanc as you will encounter on a daily basis. This is thoughtfully made, 60 percent in stainless steel and 40 percent in older French oak barrels, so the wood influence is subtle, almost subliminal, and acts as a shaping rather than a dominating factor. (Winemaker is Sarah Quider.) The color is pale gold; aromas of honeysuckle, lime peel, spiced pear and lemongrass are infused with notes of fig, fennel and dried thyme. The wine is quite lively on the palate, with bracing acidity and a scintillating limestone and flint element, and it asserts its dry yet delicious presence with an effect that’s both authoritative and tender. A lithe and supple texture leads to a finish drenched in grapefruit, mango and attentive salinity. 13.8 percent alcohol. Profound? Multi-dimensional? Revelatory? Of course not. Savory? Appealing? Satisfying? Absolutely. Very Good+. About $14, representing Terrific Value.

A sample for review.

Looking for a pinot noir that takes an approach more intense and brooding than elegant and elusive? While I am extremely fond of the pncc13 front proofelegant and elusive manner, I’ll offer a candidate for the intense and brooding position in the CrossBarn by Paul Hobbs Pinot Noir 2013, Sonoma Coast. Hobbs is well-known as a producer of pretty intense wines across the range for his eponymous label. CrossBarn is a distinct label with separate vineyard sources and a different winemaker — Greg Urmini — and is no slouch in the intensity category either. The CrossBarn Pinot Noir 2013, Sonoma Coast — there’s a cousin pinot noir from Anderson Valley — aged 10 months in French oak, only 10 percent new barrels. The color is a beautiful deep ruby-mulberry hue, entrancing as a glass of red wine in a Dutch still-life painting. Aromas of spiced and macerated black and red currants and plums are infused with notes of cloves and sassafras, pomegranate and cranberry, and after a few minutes elements of loam, oolong tea and new leather rise like a dark tide. Not surprisingly, this pinot noir is firm and dense on the palate, suoer-satiny and supple in texture and riven by incisive acidity and an underbrush quality; tannins feel etched by dusty graphite under the spare blandishment of tasty though subdued black cherry, currant and plum flavors. All in all, perfectly balanced and integrated for the earthy, thoughtful style. 14.1 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018 or ’19. Excellent. About $35.

A sample for review.

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