California


First, I apologize to the people at Dolce Wines, a sister winery to Far Niente, Nickel & Nickel and EnRoute, for holding on to these samples for so long before tasting and writing about them, but I wanted to see how a few years in the fridge would affect them. The examples in question are Dolce 2007, 06, 05 and 04, dessert wines in half-bottles, and what they reveal across four years is a remarkable and gratifying consistency in tone, structure, flavor profile and balance. Differences? Of course, and I will discuss those variations in more detail further in this post.

The partners in Far Niente conceived of the project — a small winery devoted to a single dessert wine — in 1985; the first vintage introduced commercially was 1989, released in 1992. The production of dessert wine depends on geographical and climatic conditions — foggy, with a subtle balance between warm and cool — suitable for the inoculation of the botrytis mold, the “noble rot,” that can attack grapes, suck out the moisture and reduce them to concentrated sugar bombs. This invasion occurs grape by grape, not cluster by cluster, so harvesting a vineyard affected by botrytis can take several weeks and many passes through the rows. Because of the vagaries of weather, botrytis doesn’t occur every year or it may happen in a scattered and spotty fashion, so those vintages do not result in wine. The practice is tedious, time-consuming and expensive, and great attention must be paid to detail in the vineyard and winery. The 20-acre Dolce vineyard is in Coombsville, east of Napa city, at the base of the Vaca Mountains, in an area where fog often lingers until midday, encouraging the growth of the homely but beneficial mold. The Dolce dessert wines evince a great deal of power, typically built on a base of super-ripe and seemingly roasted peaches and apricots and building other aspects of detail and dimension as the vintage dictates; their grace comes from what feels like fathomless acidity and limestone minerality that offers exquisite balance to the immense ripeness and richness. These are world-class dessert wines.
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Dolce 2007, Napa Valley. This blend of 82 percent semillon grapes and 18 percent sauvignon blanc aged 31 months in all-new French oak barrels. The residual sugar is 12.5 percent. Color is medium gold with a faint green highlight; I could smell the roasted peaches and apricots when I poured the wine into the glass. What other elements? Creme brulee, hazelnuts and almond skin, hints of mango and papaya, notes of mandarin orange and pineapple. This is, in other words, a very sweet wine, in the mouth viscous and satiny, spiced and macerated, rich, honeyed and buttery, yet electrified by vibrant — I almost wrote “violent” — acidity, so the whole musky, dusky package resonates with liveliness and frank appeal. Alcohol content is 13.5 percent. Drink now through 2025 to 2027. Excellent. About $85 a half-bottle.
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Dolce 2006, Napa Valley. For 2006, Dolce contains the most sauvignon blanc of this quartet, 20 percent against 80 percent semillon. It aged 31 months in all-new French oak barrels. Residual sugar is 13 percent, the highest of this group. The color is radiant medium gold; the bouquet is pungently smoky, ripe with creamy honeyed peaches and apricots enlivened with cloves and sandalwood, hints of coconut and pain perdu. It’s smooth as silk on the palate, round, dense and viscous, with undertones of orange marmalade, preserved lemon, lime peel and cinnamon toast; clean acidity ramps up the vibrancy and resonance, creating a finish that’s almost dry and bursting with limestone minerality. Alcohol content is 13.8 percent. Drink now through 2026 to 2030. Excellent. About $85 a half-bottle.
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The word for Dolce 2005, Napa Valley, is “otherworldly.” The blend is 90 percent semillon, 10 percent sauvignon blanc; again the oak regimen is 31 months, all-new French oak barrels; the residual sugar is 12 percent. King Midas would envy this golden richness, but this example of the wine is not only rich and ripe but elegant, almost delicate; that’s a paradoxical quality, though, because this elegance and sense of delicacy encompass sumptuous notes of roasted peaches and apricots, caramelized mango, pineapple upsidedown cake, exotic spices, all wrapped in a creamy, honeyed texture that manages to be both sophisticated and feral. The lithe, supple finish, charged with vivid acidity and scintillating limestone minerality, is the driest of this group. Alcohol content is 13.8 percent. Drink now through 2025 to 2030. Exceptional. About $85 a half-bottle.
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It’s interesting that Dolce 2004, Napa Valley, embodies the highest alcohol level of this quartet — 14.1 percent — and, logically, the lowest residual sugar at 10.8 percent; a notion of sauvignon blanc that’s almost subliminal, at 1 percent; and the least time in the typical all-new French oak barrels, 28 months, still a considerable span, of course. The color is pure shimmering gold; aromas of peach tart and apple turnover, deeply caramelized citrus and stone fruit, feel elevating and balletic, yet this is the earthiest of these wines, the one most imbued with limestone and flint minerality, all a shade darker in smoke and the redolence of toasted Asian spices. Still, it’s rich and ripe — slightly over-ripe — and, as is essential, brightened by an arrow of rigorous acidity that aims straight for the dry, uplifting finish. Drink now through 2020 to 2024. Excellent. About $85 for a half-bottle.
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Just six weeks ago I made the Flora Springs Chardonnay 2012, Napa Valley the Wine of the Week, and, darn it, I can’t help but put the Flora Springs Soliloquy Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc 2013, Oakville, in the same spot today. The grapes derive from a two-block proprietary vineyard in Napa Valley’s Oakville District AVA, and, in fact, the vineyard receives more prominent display on the label than the grape variety does. Is that device helpful to consumers? Probably not, but it makes for a very elegant and typographically balanced label, one that matches the balance and elegance of the wine. Thoughtful work by winemaker Paul Steinauer puts the wine through seven months in a combination of concrete and stainless steel tanks, oak barrels and steel drums, the result being a sauvignon blanc of unusually appealing texture, subtlety and suppleness, as well as being fresh and crisp. The color is very pale gold, almost invisible; aromas of apple peel and lime peel are woven with lemon balm and lemongrass and back-notes of celery seed, hay, fennel and thyme. Brisk acidity energizes what is otherwise a sleek and suave sauvignon blanc that encompasses stone-fruit and citrus flavors enmeshed with hints of cloves, freshly-mown grass and pink grapefruit. The finish engages the palate with a touch of grapefruit bitterness and an unexpected feral tang. 14.2 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2015 as a delightful aperitif or with grilled or roasted salmon or swordfish. Excellent. About $25.

A sample for review.

Today’s notes feature eight rosé wines, four from France, three from California and one from the state of Virginia. In style they range from ephemeral to fairly robust. I have to take shots at a couple of these examples, but those are the breaks in the realm of wine reviewing. No attempt at technical, historical, geographical or personal information here (you know, the stuff I really dote on); instead, the intent is to pique your interest and whet your palate. Except for the Calera Vin Gris of Pinot Noir 2013, these were samples for review. Enjoy!
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Chateau de Berne Terres de Berne Rosé 2013, Côtes de Provence, France. 13% alc. 50% each grenache and cinsault. Very pale onion skin hue, almost shimmers; light kisses of strawberry, peach and orange rind, hints of dried thyme; bone-dry, crisp and vibrant, loads of scintillating limestone minerality. Really well-made and enjoyable but packaged in an annoying over-designed bottle that’s too tall to fit on a refrigerator shelf. Excellent. About $20.
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Bila-Haut Rosé 2013, Pays d’Oc, France. 13.5% alc. Cinsault and grenache. (From M. Chapoutier) Pretty copper-salmon color; orange zest and raspberries, dusty minerals, notes of rose petals and lavender; quite dry, with limestone austerity, a fairly earthy, rustic style of rose, not in the elegant or delicate fashion. Very Good. About $13.
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Calera Vin Gris of Pinot Noir 2013, Central Coast. 14.7% alc. 466 cases. Bright copper-peach color; think of this as a cadet pinot noir in the form of a rosé; currants and plums, raspberry with a bit of briery rasp; notes of smoke and dried Provencal herbs, hints of pomegranate and orange zest; very clean, fresh and vibrant with a damp limestone foundation. Excellent. About $17.
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Dunstan Durell Vineyard Rosé of Pinot Noir 2013, Sonoma Coast. 13% alc. 92 cases. Light but bright copper-salmon-topaz hue; strawberries and red currants, both fresh and dried, blood orange, note of pomegranate; lovely, lithe and supple but energized by brisk acidity; floral element burgeons and blossoms in the glass, as in rose petals and camellias; very dry, delicate, ethereal yet with a real bedrock of limestone minerality; a touch earthier than the version of 2012. Excellent. About $25.
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Domaine de la Mordorée “La Dame Rousse” 2013, Tavel, France. 14.5% alc. 60% grenache, 10% each cinsault, syrah and mourvèdre, 5% each bourboulenc and clairette. Brilliant strawberry-copper color; strawberries, raspberries and red currants with a touch of peach; very dry and fairly robust for rosé; notes of dried herbs and summer flowers, dominant component of limestone and flint, almost tannic in effect, but overall high-toned and elegant. Excellent. About $30.
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Notorious Pink 2013, Vin de France. Alc% NA. 100% grenache. (Domaine la Colombette) Better to call this one Innocuous Pink. Carries delicacy to the point of attenuation; very pale onion skin color; faintest tinge of strawberry, bare hint of orange zest and limestone; fairly neutral all the way round. Comes in an upscale frosted bottle, woo-hoo. Good. About $20.
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Stinson Vineyards Rosé 2013, Virginia, USA. 12% alc. 100 percent mourvèdre. 120 cases. Ruddy onion skin hue; fresh strawberries and raspberries with cloves and slightly dusty graphite in the back; notes of orange pekoe tea and dried red currants; a little fleshy and floral; bright acidity and a mild limestone-like finish. Very Good+. About $18.
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Robert Turner Wines Mosaic Rosé of Pinot Noir 2013, Santa Lucia Highlands. 14% alc. With 15% cabernet franc. 25 cases. Pale copper-onion skin color; musky and dusky melon, raspberry and strawberry with notes of pomegranate and rhubarb; finely-knit texture, delicate, elegant, lively, with a honed limestone finish. Excellent. About $22.
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…might be called the Isabel Mondavi Deep Rosé Cabernet Sauvignon 2013, Napa Valley, and in case any of you winemakers out there are thinking, “What a great name! I think I’ll use ‘deep rose’ for my label,” there’s a little trademark symbol that protects the name from other use. Anyway, this is 100 percent cabernet sauvignon, from vineyards in the Altas Peak, Rutherford and Howell Mountain AVAs, made all in stainless steel after a long cool fermentation. The color is an entrancing medium ruby-magenta hue, a little darker and richer than the color of most rosé wines. The impressions are fresh and grapey, with notes of red currants and raspberries and a lift of just-cut Braeburn apple; hints of cranberry and rhubarb linger in the background. The freshness, bright berryish qualities and element of earthiness remind me of Beaujolais-Villages, particularly in the bouquet, but in body and dark spicy red and blue fruit flavors it feels like what in Bordeaux is called clairette, a wine that’s darker and exhibits slightly more heft than a Bordeaux rosé but is lighter than a “regular” cuvée. The combination of freshness, elegance and substance makes the Isabel Mondavi Deep Rosé 2013 a versatile match with all sorts of summertime fare. Alcohol level is a sane and manageable 13.2 percent. Winemaker for the Isabel Mondavi label is Rob Mondavi Jr. Drink now into 2015. Excellent. About $20.

A sample for review.

Gewurztraminer might not be as off-putting to so many people if its name were changed to Steve or Samantha, but there it is, a grape that can be made into one of the most beautiful wines in the world with a name that is almost unpronounceable. So be it. Gewurztraminer thrives in Alsace, where France nestles uneasily against Germany, and to some extent in the northeastern Italian region of Alto Adige, in the Tyrol Alps just south of Austria. There are outposts in other countries, such as Australia and New Zealand, and also in the states of Oregon and California, and it’s to the latter that we turn for today’s Wine of the Week, the Gundlach Bundschu Estate Vineyard Gewurztraminer 2013, Sonoma Coast. The vineyard lies at a fairly low elevation in the southwestern foothills of the Mayacamas range. Ninety percent of this clean, fresh, crisp wine was made in stainless steel, the rest in neutral oak barrels. The color is very pale gold; aromas of rose petals, lychee and spiced pear are highlighted by notes of white pepper, peach and lime peel, all subtly and delicately woven. Acidity is essential to the success of gewurztraminer — as in any wine, truly — to balance the potentially overpowering floral and fruity elements, and this example has acidity in spades, a factor that contributes to its appealing liveliness and its deft poise. Citrus and stone-fruit meld seamlessly in the mouth, while the spicy, limestone-laced finish brings in a hint of grapefruit pith bitterness, savory, astringent and exciting. 14.3 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2019 to ’22 with — I know this is the cliche — moderately spicy Thai or Vietnamese cuisine, with grilled shrimp or mussels, with seafood risotto. Excellent. About $22.50.

A sample for review.

In the ancient Occitan language of the South of France, picho means “petit,” hence la pitchoune is a diminutive for “little one.” That’s the name that Julia Child and her husband Paul gave to the cottage they built in the village of Plascassier in Provence, now a cooking school. And that’s the name of a small-production winery, founded in 2005, that makes tiny amounts of wine from Sonoma Coast grapes. Winemaker and partner is Andrew Berge, and he turns out, at least in the samples I was sent, wines of wonderful finesse and elegance.
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The color of La Pitchoune Vin Gris of Pinot Noir 2012, Sonoma Coast, is vivid copper-salmon. A bouquet of slightly fleshy strawberries and raspberries opens to notes of watermelon, spiced tea and flint; this is bone-dry but juicy and tasty with raspberry, melon and dried red currant flavors, a rosé of nuance and delicacy enlivened by crisp acidity, a slightly leafy aspect and a finish drenched with damp limestone minerality. 14.2 percent alcohol. Production was 39 cases. I could drink this all Summer long. Excellent. About $30.
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La Pitchoune Pinot Noir 2012, Sonoma Coast, offers a transparent medium ruby color and enticing aromas of rhubarb, cranberry and pomegranate wreathed with sassafras and cloves, rose petals and lilac. The texture feels like the coolest, sexiest satin imaginable, riven by acidity as striking as a red sash on a blue coat; the resulting sense of tension, resolution and balance is the substance of which great wines are made. Oak is subliminal, a subtle, supple shaping influence, so the wine feels quite lithe and light on its feet; flavors of spiced and macerated black cherries and plums emit a curl of smoke and a wisp of ash as prelude to a lively finish permeated by notes of briers, brambles and loam. 14.2 percent alcohol. Production was 279 cases. Sublime pinot noir for drinking through 2017 or ’18. Exceptional. About $60.
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You’ll have to do a little searching for this beauty, My Readers, because the production is limited, but if you’re a fan of rosé wines, this is worth a phone call or visit to the winery website. The MacPhail Family Wines Rosé of Pinot Noir 2013, Sonoma Coast, offers a radiant copper-salmon color and bright aromas of dried red currants and strawberries with a hint of peaches and orange zest. The wine is clean, fresh and dry, but nor austere; an earthy, slightly brambly background encompasses notes of wild berries and cloves, over a dusty limestone element; there’s even a touch of tannic power under the vivid acidity, but this is not one of those serious rosés that neglects its higher purpose: to be delightful and pleasurable and vivacious. 14.5 percent alcohol. 400 cases. James MacPhail founded the winery in 2002; it is now part of Hess Family Estates. Excellent. About $22.

A sample for review.

Your eyes do not deceive you, My Readers. Today’s Weekend Wine Notes offer 10 wines priced under $20, in actuality, from about $12 to $19. We flaunt our eclectic nature today, reaching from various regions of California to Germany, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Argentina and Australia, and embracing many grape varieties and styles of wine. As usual with the Weekend Wine Notes I dispense with large quantities of technical, historical and geographical data to bring you quick incisive reviews meant to pique your interest and titillate your taste buds. Remember, please, that all wines are not available in all areas of our country nor even in all retail stores in the same city. That’s just the mechanics of distribution and consumer interest. In any case, enjoy these selections where you find them, in moderation, of course. Except for one wine, these were samples for review.
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Adobe Pink 2013, Paso Robles. 46% syrah, 37% grenache noir, 17% mourvèdre. 14.5% alc. Brilliant salmon-peach color with a tinge of copper; pure strawberry and raspberry and lightly curranty, hints of tangerine and candied kumquat; watermelon and raspberry in the mouth, quite dry but ripe and juicy; snappy acidity, plenty of limestone minerality and a slightly earthy, austere finish. Drink up. Very Good+. About $14.
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Bonny Doon Albariño 2013, Central Coast. 100% albariño. 13.2% alc. Pale gold color; seductive bouquet of roasted lemon and lemon balm, quince and ginger, notes of camellia, almond blossom and lime peel; quite dry and spare, savory, saline, bracing acidity; large component of limestone and oyster shell minerality; attractive, vibrant and resonant. Now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $18.
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Isabelino 2012, Rueda, Spain. 85% verdejo, 15% viura. 13% alc. Bright straw-yellow; earthy, savory and briny, seashell and limestone; roasted lemon and yellow plum, a hint of spiced pear and overripe peach and a shade funky; lovely silken texture riven by vibrant acidity. Line up the oysters fresh from the deep. Drink up. Very Good. About $12.
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Poggio Anima Belial 2011, Toscana I.G.T., Italy. 100% sangiovese. Medium ruby color, tinge of garnet; red and black currants and cherries, cloves and allspice; violets and potpourri; orange zest, oolong tea, slightly earthy and leathery; very dry with rousing acidity and lip-smacking tannins, lots of presence and personality for the price. Through 2015. Very Good+. About $16 (Discounted to $13 at the retail shop where I purchased it.)
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Reichsgraf von Kesselstatt “RK” Riesling, 2012, Mosel, Germany. 100% riesling. 10% alc. Pale gold color; lemon and lychee, rubber eraser, heather and hay, wisps of jasmine and honeysuckle; modestly sweet entry then bone-dry from mid-palate through the finish; spiced peach and pear, slightly earthy; lithe and lively and with scintillating limestone minerality balanced by moderate lushness in texture. A sleek, tasty beauty. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $19.
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Souverain Sauvignon Blanc 2012, North Coast. 100% sauvignon blanc. 13.5% alc. Light gold hue; lime peel, pink grapefruit, lemongrass, celery seed, hints of lilac and tangerine; quite bright, fresh, crisp and lively; lots of limestone and flint minerality; grapefruit rind and almond skin finish, with a hint of bracing bitterness. Super attractive. Now through 2015. Very Good+. About $13.
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Vale do Bomfim 2011, Douro, Portugal. From the House of Dow’s. 14.5% alc. 40% tinta barroca, 25% touriga nacional, 25% touriga franca, 10% tinta roriz. Deep ruby-purple with a magenta rim; very engaging aromas: black cherries, blackberries and mulberries, lavender and potpourri, hints of graphite and blueberry jam; quite dry, sleek and supple, peppery, with raspy and briery tannins, touches of leather and woodsy spice. Now through 2015. Very Good. About $12.
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Vina Robles White(4) 2013, Paso Robles. 14.9% alc. Viognier 46%, verdelho 19%, vermentino 19%, sauvignon blanc 16%. Very pale gold hue; mango, ginger and quince, citrus and stone-fruit with emphasis on rinds and stones; jasmine and yellow plums; spare and slightly astringent floral and mineral elements; lovely texture, shapely and silky, almost lush but cut by bright acidity for liveliness and crispness. Now through 2016. Very Good+. About $16.
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Wakefield Promised Land Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, South Australia. 100% cabernet sauvignon. 13.5% alc. Dark ruby-purple; cedar, tobacco, dried rosemary; intense and concentrated notes of black currants, raspberries and cherries; hints of black olive, leather and loam; dense, chewy, sleek and lithe; ripe and tasty black fruit supported by earthy, leathery, very dry tannins and a touch of spicy oak. Grill a steak; open a bottle. Now through 2016 or ’17. Very Good+. About $13.
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William Cole Columbine Special Reserve Pinot Noir 2012, Casablanca Valley, Chile. 100% pinot noir. 13% alc. Medium ruby color; pomegranate and rhubarb, cloves and sassafras, notes of leather, tomato skin, tobacco leaf and briers, a little rooty; smooth and satiny; smoke, black cherry, fairly earthy yet with a spare, ethereal character. An interesting interpretation of the grape. Now through 2015. Very Good+. About $17.
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My Readers, about two weeks about I posted to this blog a piece that concerned the cabernet-based red wines of Renaissance Vineyards and Winery, tasted during an all-day event at the winery. Those red wines ranged from 2012 back to 1983. Today, it’s the turn of the winery’s white wines, table wines first and then dessert wines going back to 1989. Remember that these wines are made in small, even minute quantities. Eddie Schulter has been winemaker since 2012. Gideon Beinstock was winemaker from 1994 to 2011. Original winemaker was Karl Werner. Renaissance frankly wants to figure out what to do with the surprisingly large quantities of library wines it possesses, an issue about which I will express an opinion in a few days. The appellation is North Yuba, Sierra Foothills.
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Dry (or dry-ish) wines:

>Semillon 2013. Pale gold color; figs, roasted lemon; sunny and leafy; quince and ginger; rich, ripe, “golden,” but very dry and with spanking acidity. Lovely wine, seductive and elegant. .

>Roussanne 2013. Bright medium gold; straw, thyme, camellia; spiced pear; rich, viscous, creamy, balanced by clean acidity and an undertow of limestone minerality.

>Roussanne 2007. Bright yellow-gold hue; spicy and exotic, slightly honeyed, ripe and almost fleshy, more subtly floral; sandalwood, lilac, yellow plums and roasted lemon; quite dry with a close to austere finish. Needs three or four years.

>Late Harvest Roussanne 2006. Bright gold hue; lychee, mango and petrol (or call it diesel or rubber eraser); quince jam, crystallized ginger; slightly sweet entry but dry from mid-palate back; powerful and resonant acidity. Not so much a dessert wine as a notably intense and fruity table wine.

>Roussanne 2005. Medium gold color; quince, mango, fig and apricot; nougat and roasted honey, but dry, almost tannic in character; exquisite balance among fruit, acidity and limestone minerality; crystalline transparency and a dynamic presence. Drink now through 2020 or so.

>Roussanne 2002. Bright gold color; touch of maturity in notes of tobacco leaf, slightly overripe peaches and soft plums; bracing acidity, wet stone minerality and slightly bitter grapefruit and almond skin keep it honest.

>Viognier 2002. Medium gold hue; riesling-like nose, petrol, jasmine, bee’s-wax and lanolin; ripe and honeyed but lithe and sinewy on the palate; very dry, tremendous acidity. Lacks expression and balance.

>Riesling 2002. Medium gold color, green tinge; pure riesling: petrol, lychee, mango and pear, notes of camellia and jasmine; very intense, vibrant and resonance; wonderful supple texture buoyed by burgeoning acidity and a scintillating limestone element. In a restaurant with a sophisticated clientele, a canny sommelier could sell the hell out of this.
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Dessert wines:

>Late Harvest Semillon 2006. Medium gold-amber color, not quite sweet, not quite dry, needs four to six years to come together.

>Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc 1994. Medium amber color; maple syrup and toffee, pine, glazed peaches and apricots, candied lime; momentous acidity and limestone minerality. Drink now through 2020 to ’24.

>Late Harvest Riesling 1992. Entrancing medium gold-amber hue; jasmine and honeysuckle, baked peaches and pears, loads of cloves and sandalwood; caramelized grapefruit; seductive almost viscous texture but not cloying, cut by vibrant acidity; actually fairly light on its feet. Drink now through 2020 to ’24.

>Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc 1991. Bright gold-amber color; orange marmalade and flan, caramelized peaches and apricots, generous dollops of cloves and nutmeg; all supported by scintillating acidity that keeps a fine balance between lush fruit and taut structure. Drink now through 2018 to 2022.

>Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc 1989. Almost 25 years old and about as perfect as it gets. Medium gold-amber; cloves and allspice, orange zest and toffee; honeyed richness with a contrasting note of almond skin bitterness; nervy, lithe and supple; roasted peaches and hints of pears and grapefruit; lovely confidence and completeness. Now through 2019 to ’24.

>Late Harvest Riesling 1989. Dark amber-maple color; honeyed apricots, baked peaches, spiced pears, salted caramel and toffee, intensely floral; quite spicy and savory; very dense and viscous, slides across the palate like money, with brilliant acidity providing the saving grace. At its peak now but drink through 2019 to ’24.
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Though I have been writing about the wines made by Gideon Beinstock for 20 years, I met him for the first time three weeks ago at a dinner party in the Sierra Foothills, northeast of Sacramento. Around dusk, a group of us were sitting outside, and Beinstock opened a bottle of his Clos Saron Out of the Blue 2013, a blend of 90 percent cinsault and five percent each syrah and graciano grapes. This was also my first encounter with a wine under the Clos Saron label, which he and his wife Saron Rice launched in 1996, while he was winemaker for Renaissance Vineyard and Winery. You know how it is, friends. You sniff a wine, take a sip, and you know that this is the real thing, an amalgam of such intensity and expansiveness, of such vibrancy and resonance that most other wines seem amateurish in comparison. The next day, I visited Clos Saron and tasted through the winery’s currant releases and wines in the barrel. My colleagues on this occasion were Gary Paul Fox, owner and winemaker of Bangor Ranch Vineyard & Winery, and Cara Zujewski, who with her partner Aaron Mockrish, operates the local Three Cedars Ranch, she doing produce, he raising sheep.

The Israeli-French Beinstock arrived at what became Renaissance in the 1970s and helped plant the original vines. He spent most of the 1980s working in vineyards in Burgundy and the Rhone Valley. and when he returned to Yuba County, he took the position as assistant winemaker to Diane Werner, widow of the estate’s first winemaker Karl Werner. Beinstock became winemaker for Renaissance in 1994, a job he held until 2011. He told me that for his last few years at Renaissance, his “heart was not in it,” and he extricated himself from the Fellowship of Friends, the spiritual organization that owns the estate, and took up the reins of Clos Saron full-time.

Clos Saron occupies a rustic compound near the community of Oregon House — motto: “We’re not actually in Oregon!” — where the structure in which he and his wife and children live lies a few steps from the winery. The Home Vineyard extends practically from their front door down a slight slope. Also on site are sheep, chickens and geese. Beinstock’s methodology is about as minimal as winemaking gets. The winery possesses neither a crusher nor a destemmer; all crushing is done by foot-stomping, and fermentation takes place with stems in open-top casks; because of the stems, fermentation is relatively short, that is, four to 10 days. Grapes are not inoculated with commercial yeast, but fermentation is impelled by natural yeast on the grape skins. Acidity is never “corrected.” New oak makes no appearance at Clos Saron. Battonage (stirring) and racking do not occur while wines are in barrel; wines are only racked directly to bottle. Sulfur dioxide is applied at a minimum degree, 20/25 parts per million. Red wines are neither fined nor filtered.

The result, to my palate, are wines that display a remarkable measure of authenticity and integrity, purity and intensity, the exhilarating quality of a wine that goes almost directly from the vineyard to the glass. I asked Beinstock if he missed working with cabernet sauvignon, the grape that put Renaissance on the map, admittedly a small map considering the limited production. He said, “Truly, what I’m most fascinated with is soil, not the grape. I worked with cabernet at Renaissance because of the microclimate. It’s one of the world’s best sites for cabernet. Here I work with different grapes because of the location. A lean soil over layers of volcanic ash and decomposed granite.” The Home Vineyard slopes gently to the northeast at 1600 feet above sea-level.

How do you find these wines, usually made in a total quantity of about 800 cases a year? They’re available at a handful of restaurants and retailers in California, New York and around Boston and Washington D.C.; or from the winery website: clossaron.com

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Current and recent releases:
>Clos Saron Syrah 2013. An experimental blend of Stone Soup syrah with 30 percent (white) verdejo; powerful, very spicy and fruity; seductive body and texture. $NA.
>Clos Saron Stone Soup Syrah 2013. Inky purple, penetrating graphite and granitic minerality; very intense and concentrated, very spicy. Try 2017 or ’18 through 2023 to ’25. Typically 60 to 150 cases. About $50
>Clos Saron Stone Soup Syrah 2012. A touch more open and approachable than the ’13; slightly fleshy and meaty, grounded in iodine and iron, bright acidity; fresh with ambient elegance. 2015 through 2025. About $50
>Out of the Blue 2013. 90 percent cinsault, 5 percent syrah, 5 percent graciano. The cinsault vines were planted in 1885, and the vineyard is still owned by the same family. Lovely heft and body, profoundly lively, vibrant and appealing; black and blue fruit scents and flavors, permeated by briers and brambles, graphite and dusty tannins. Approximately 170 cases. About $30.
>A Deeper Shade of Blue 2013. 56 percent syrah, 38 percent old vine grenache, 6 percent verdejo. Quite spicy and minerally, currants and blueberries and plums, slightly macerated and roasted; smooth and polished but earthy, rooty, slightly granitic. About $35.
>Pinot Noir 2011. Grapes from the Home Vineyard. Dark ruby with a violet tinge; deeply earthy and minerally, a bit of iron; but fresh and clean and penetrating, currant and plum fruit, tremendous presence, vibrancy and tenacity; dusty tannins but sleek supple texture; one of the most individual and expressive pinot noirs I have tasted. Approximately 108 cases. About $60.
>Stone Soup Syrah 2011. Awesome purity, intensity and concentration; you feel the rock-strew soil of that precipitous vineyard, the deep foundation of tannin and acidity, the cut and edge of graphite, the spareness and elegance yet the paradoxically voluptuous aura of ripe blackberries, currants and plums. Approximately 104 cases. About $50.
>Heart of Stone Syrah 2009. With 10 percent viognier. Very earthy, piercing graphite minerality, deeply and darkly spicy, intense and concentrated, black and blue fruit; powerhouse acidity and tannin, briery and brambly, root-like; incredibly supple texture. 125 cases. About $45.
>Cuvee Mysterieuse 2009. 64 percent syrah, 30 percent merlot, 6 percent viognier. Lovely, rich and warm but intense, well-knit, vibrant, supple, resonant; quite floral, very spicy, earthy and imbued with a huge lithic minerally component. About 96 cases. Price $45.
>Black Pearl 2008. 65 percent syrah, 27 percent cabernet sauvignon, 6 percent petit verdot, 2 percent merlot. Ripe, spicy and minerally; black and red cherries and currants with a touch of plum; smoky, briers and brambles, touch of old leather, dusty tannins, vibrant acidity. Approximately 97 cases. About $45.
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From the barrel:

First, we tried a couple of wines made from fruit purchased in Lodi, a Tickled Pink Rose 2013 that won’t be released until 2015, 100 percent graciano grapes, a dry, spare, elegant and intellectual rose; and the Carte Blanche 2013, a half-half blend of verdelho and albarino grapes that builds remarkable density and character in the glass while remaining bright, clean, fresh and elevating.

Then, we moved on to the components of pinot noirs from 2013 and 2012, getting an impression of what the separate blocks or lots in the vineyard offer.

For 2013, the North Block (planted in 1999) is a radiant dark purple hue, deep and spicy, with notes of lavender and violets, very dry, bastions of tannin. The South Block is quite earthy and loamy, delivering rooty briers and brambles and tannins that are dominant but not punishing. The Lower Block is indeed the “blockiest,” the most inchoate and unformed, even feral. Older Block, grafted in 1995 to cabernet stock planted in 1980 and interplanted between, feels the most complete and comprehensible as pinot noir, very dry, with spanking acidity but with spice and violets and lovely fruit. Finally, in this group, we tasted the Pinot Noir 2013 that’s a blend of these separate blocks, a wine that’s inky-purple, very dry, impressively vibrant and resonant and starting to be expressive.

For 2012, the North Block offers a hint of floral character but is incredibly intense and concentrated and wrapped by tight tannins. Lower Block is deep, dark and spicy, roiling with earth and loam and quite tannic. Older Block delivers a thread of spice, dried flowers and black fruit through the vibrant acidity and minerally tannins. The blend of these three vineyards — we didn’t taste the 2012 from South Block — felt almost like real pinot noir, complete, confident, both deep and elevating.

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