Cabernet franc


Lordy, I haven’t posted a “Whither Napa Valley Cabernet” entry since June 30. That’s totally remiss for two reasons: First, I receive a ton of samples in that genre, and, second, California’s Napa Valley is one of the best places in the world for producing excellent cabernet sauvignon wines. Not that Napa Valley has a lock on delivering great cabernet-based wines in California; such an assessment would be unfair to Sonoma County’s Alexander Valley, Sonoma Valley and Knights Valley, to Paso Robles in San Luis Obispo County, and other pockets of congenial micro-climate here and there in the Golden State. Today’s post looks at nine examples of cabernet sauvignon and cabernet-based wines, mostly from 2013, with a few from 2012 and one from 2014. It’s a miscellaneous group falling under the general Napa Valley designation; two of these display more specific appellations, Oakville and Rutherford. Prices range from $45 to $90, an upper range that reflects not only supposed standards of quality but perceived reputation and the cost of doing business, as in the prices of grapes, cultivated acreage and new French oak barrels. The wines also reflect similarities and differences in philosophy and winemaking techniques. Oak regimens and blending percentages vary widely as does the scale of alcohol content. As with any consumer product, you pays yer money and you takes yer choice.

These wines were samples for review.
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The Acumen Wines Mountainside Red Wine 2013, Napa Valley, feels indeed as if it had been hewn from granite outcroppings, and in fact the grapes derive from organically farmed vineyards in Atlas Peak. The wine is a blend of 74 percent cabernet sauvignon, 14 percent malbec and 12 percent merlot that aged 18 months in French oak, 72 percent new barrels. The color is dark ruby with a glowing purple rim; notes of black currants, black cherries and blueberries are imbued with elements of graphite, iodine and iron that after a few minutes in the glass emit hints of rosemary, cedar and celery seed and an intense aroma of wood smoke. Steep gritty tannins and profound granitic minerality make for an experience that feels as if you’re drinking architecture, and these qualities inform the austere finish. Still, you sense the balance here, the shifting tectonic plates of structure gradually transforming itself to something equitable. A refreshing 13.3 percent alcohol. Try 2018 or ’19 through 2029-’33. Production was 1,200 cases. Winemaker was the well-known Steve Matthiasson. Excellent potential. About $45.
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The Amici Cellars Cabernet Sauvignon 2012 carries a Napa Valley designation but the grapes derive from specific AVAs amici_cs_napawithin the valley: 67 percent from Rutherford, 20 from Atlas Peak, 9 from Coombsville, 3 percent from Calistoga and a smidgeon of 1 percent from Spring Mountain. In other words, the wine is a canny blend of grapes from cool and warm districts, from flat areas and mountain slopes, all helping to establish a general “Napa Valley’ character to the wine. The blend is 85 percent cabernet sauvignon, 11 merlot, 3 cabernet franc and 1 petit verdot; the wine aged 20 months in French oak, 50 percent new barrels. Winemaker was Tony Biagi. The color is very dark ruby-purple with a magenta rim; while the emphasis is on dimension and circumference defined by dusty, velvety tannins, burnished oak and vibrant acidity, the wine allows classic notes of black olive, cedar and tobacco, ripe black currants and raspberries to assert themselves. A few moments in the glass bring in hints of plums and cloves, black pepper and mocha, as well as a graphite edge, so the wine feels both warm with spice and cool with minerals, all etched by chiseled minerality that extends through the finish. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink now — with a medium-rare ribeye steak, hot and crusty from the grill — through 2022 to ’24. Excellent. About $45.
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One of the flagship wines for Franciscan Estate is the Magnificat red wine blend based on cabernet sauvignon with franciscan-estate-2012-magnificat-meritage-label-frontcontributions from the other “noble” Bordeaux grape varieties. For 2012 and 2013, the wines received the same oak treatment, 20 months in French oak, 70 percent new barrels. The blends differ slightly, with the 2012 being 73 percent cabernet sauvignon with 19 percent merlot, three percent each petit verdot and malbec and two percent cabernet franc; the 2013 is also 73 percent cabernet sauvignon, with 24 percent merlot, two percent malbec and one percent cabernet franc, eliminating the dollop of petit verdot. Winemaker was Janet Myers. Not surprisingly, or perhaps disappointingly, these “meritage” wines are quite similar, the ’12 being slightly softer and more approachable than the ’13 but both focused on structure and foundation to a degree that feels not only solid but stodgy. The Magnificat 2012 displays real depth and breadth in its dark granitic minerality and sturdy tannins but not much in the way of the detail that makes a wine compelling and alluring, even at a relatively young age. The Magnificat 2013 feels like an ancient cathedral of a wine, very dense and intense, with dry austere tannins and profound granitic minerality; something slightly warm and spicy lends a touch of appeal but this is essentially a stout, rock-ribbed edifice established on palate-scouring tannins and acidity. After tasting this pair of cabernets, I wanted to say, “Hey, lighten up, even powerful and structured wines can be made with more deftness than these were.” Each features 14.5 percent alcohol. Each I rate Very Good+ with the admonition not to touch for five years. Each costs about $55.
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In the Galerie “Pleinair” Cabernet Sauvignon 2013, Napa valley, Laura Diaz Muñozcrafted a 100 percent varietal wine whose potential lies two or three years ahead. Aged 20 months in French oak, 53 percent new barrels, bottled unfined and unfiltered, this cabernet displays a deep opaque ebony hue and profound intensity and concentration. Its initial phase of iodine, iron and graphite segues into spiced and macerated currants, raspberries and plums opening to notes — after an hour — of walnut shell, cloves and allspice, roasted fennel and caraway seed. The wine is dense and chewy but lithe and supple, dark with rooty-loamy elements, woodsy and mushroomy, and a little knotty with aspects of briers, brambles and forest floor; the black and red berry flavors course over the palate animated by bright acidity. 14.5 percent alcohol. 2018 through 2028 to ’30. Production was 1,616 cases. Excellent. About $50.
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The Grgich Hills Estate Cabernet Sauvignon 2013, Napa Valley, reveals a gratifying consistency cs-2013-front_750-alcwith its cousins from previous vintages, while expressing a sense of individuality accorded by a great year. The blend is 79 percent cabernet sauvignon, 11 percent merlot, 5 petit verdot, 4 cabernet franc; the wine aged 21 months in French oak, 60 percent new barrels. The color is dense ruby-purple, while the whole package reflects that intensity and concentration; the initial impressions are all structural: earth, loam and walnut shell; dusty, graphite-laden tannins; a dense and chewy texture; a deep austere finish. Yet the wine is also vibrant, dynamic, resonant and strangely appealing, with its hints of tightly-packed and spicy black fruit flavors. Try from 2018 through 2028 to ’30. 14.6 percent alcohol. Excellent potential. About $69.
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The Grgich Hills Estate Miljenko’s Selection Cabernet Sauvignon 2013, Rutherford, is 100 percent2013-csrf_front_with-alc cabernet sauvignon that aged 18 months in French oak, 80 percent new barrels. The color is motor oil opaque shading to a medium ruby-hued rim; as with its stablemate mentioned just above, this wine is immense in structure, deep, intense and concentrated, which character does not prevent it from delivering classic notes of cedar, rosemary and tobacco, black olive and a hint of bell pepper, all buoying a finely-chiseled melange of black currants, raspberries and plums. In fact, for all its size and dimension, this cabernet offers a ripe, spicy, meaty and fleshy aspect not quite belied by its formidable dusty, loamy tannins and its tremendous dignity and authority. 14.3 percent alcohol. Try 2018 or ’19 through 2030 or ’33. Excellent potential. About $90.
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The Jayson label is the second line from Pahlmeyer Vineyards and comes in as slightly less jay-cabexpensive than the top tier, though these are not inexpensive by any means. The Jayson Cabernet Sauvignon 2014, Napa Valley, sees 5 percent cabernet franc with the balance cabernet sauvignon; the wine aged 17 months in French oak, 65 percent new barrels. The color epitomizes the entire experience of this wine, from its intense inky center fading to the transparent ruby-tinged rim, that is, from tremendous depth and dimension to an element of elegance and even delicacy. Most apparent, though, is the wine’s immense honed and chiseled granitic structure, abetted by polished oak and plush, dusty, rigorous tannins; it feels carved from mountainsides. Aromas of iodine and iron open to deliriously attractive notes of black currants, cherries and plums, highlighted by hints of blueberry and pomegranate, tapenade and ancho chili and wild notions of cedar and rosemary, wood smoke, lilac and lavender. Yes, this is damned heady stuff, richly layered and nuanced. The whole project is, not surprisingly, quite serious on the palate, yet its structure of wood and acidity, tannin and graphite-infused minerality does not advance on the punishing scale; the totality is balanced and integrated, though deep and multi-dimensional. 15.1 percent alcohol. Try from 2018 or ’19 through 2030 to ’34. Winemaker was Kale Anderson. This wine feels to me like the essence and apex of Napa Valley cabernet sauvignon. Exceptional. About $75.
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The Robert Mondavi Oakville Cabernet Sauvignon 2013, Napa Valley, utilizes the five classic Bordeaux red grapes: 81 percent cabernet sauvignon, 13 percent cabernet franc and 2 percent each malbec, merlot and petit verdot; the wine aged 22 months in French oak, 72 percent new barrels. The color could not be a more dark, dense and radiant ruby-purple that shades to a glowing magenta rim; in its incisive granitic minerality and dusty graphite-tinged tannins, the wine feels absolutely true to the Oakville model; it offers ripe and slightly fleshy notes of currants, raspberries and plums infused with cedar and rosemary — with a hint of the latter’s feral, woodsy astringency — black olives and lavender melded in a seamless array of superb balance and integration. It’s quite dry, and the chiseled mineral aspects bolster the long finish. 14.5 percent alcohol. Now through 2022 to ’25. Director of winemaking for Robert Mondavi is Geneviève Janssens. Excellent. About $60.
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More time in oak but less new oak than the previous wine was the regimen for the Robert Mondavi BDX 2013, Oakville, aging 29 months in French wood, 32 percent new barrels. BDX stands for Bordeaux; this wine is a blend of 68 percent cabernet sauvignon and 32 percent cabernet franc. I was impressed by the wine’s lovely balance and integration, for all its size and substance. A dark ruby hue shades to a bright magenta rim; aromas of ripe black currants, raspberries and plums are permeated by notes of iodine, iron and mint, making for a ferrous, sanguinary and slightly herbaceous red wine highlighted by touches of lavender and violets, cedar and tobacco. Yep, it’s a big one, quite dry and cushioned by supple dusty tannins, while animated by a beaming line of bright acidity; the finish is packed with graphite tinged minerality and an array of spicy black fruit flavors. 14.5 percent alcohol. You could drink this wine tonight with a steak or braised short ribs or wait a couple of years; it should develop beautifully through 2027 to ’30. Excellent. About $65.
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By “sweethearts,” I don’t mean sweet wines but wines that are so pleasing and engaging that they seem as irresistible and buoyant as a pair of young lovers, hand in hand, lightly treading the dewy grass on a bonny morning. This pair of wines, from the Anjou area of France’s vast Loire Valley region, is new to America and originates in a family-owned concern that dates to 1790. Chateau de la Mulonnière is a project of the Saget La Perrière family that owns 890 acres in the Loire Valley spread over six estates. Anjou lies southeast of the city of Angers, a beautiful town with a magnificent castle and a medieval quarter that features an array of half-timbered buildings. Vineyard cultivation and winemaking in Anjou go back to the 11th Century and except for the interregnums of war, plague and the phylloxera, have been pretty much unabated for a thousand years.

Pasternak Wine Imports, Harrison, N.Y. Samples for review.
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The M de Mulonnière Rosé 2015, Rosé d’Anjou, is a blend of 40 percent cabernet franc, 30 percent M rosegrolleau, 20 cabernet sauvignon and 10 gamay. It offers a bright medium copper-salmon hue — it’s not nearly as pale as its counterparts in Provence and the southern Rhône Valley tend to be — and strikingly pungent and pure aromas of strawberries and raspberries, lime leaf and tomato skin, red currants and, faintly, pomegranate. The wine is quite dry, but juicy with ripe red berry flavors flushed with orange rind, flowing on a silky texture over the palate. A firm line of limestone minerality and bright acidity contributes a welcome element of spareness to a fairly ripe and fleshy rosé. Quite delightful. 12 percent alcohol. Very Good+. About $15.
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The M de Mulonnière Chenin Blanc 2015, Anjou, is 100 percent varietal. The color is pale gold, lent a shimmer by a delicate pétillant quality; the nose on this wine is eminently attractive, composed of seamless notes of hay and spiced pear, yellow plums, lilac, heather and bay leaf, with a background of gunflint and graphite, all bound and permeated by a golden, slightly honeyed character. Not to imply anything sweet; the wine is seriously dry but presents a round, ripe and supple nature — all yellow fruit and meadow flowers — that slides with pure pleasure across the tongue. 12.5 percent alcohol. We drank this with swordfish — marinated in lemon juice, olive oil, soy sauce and rubbed with minced garlic and ginger, seared in the cast-iron skillet– but it would be equally appropriate matched with seafood risottos, trout amandine, quenelles of pike or grilled shrimp. Excellent. About $15, representing Great Value.
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Does Randall Grahm need four rosé wines among his current releases from Bonny Doon roseVineyard? One would have to take a dusky stroll through the shadowy, convoluted corridors of Grahm’s imagination to find an answer to that question. Sufficient to our task is the presence of these products — samples for review — not all of which are as straightforward as the term rosé would indicate. Two of these wines are based on Rhone Valley grape varieties, not a surprise since Bonny Doon specializes in wines made from such grapes, but another was made from ciliegiolo grapes, a distaff cousin or bastard child, as it were, to sangiovese, while the last is composed of grapes from France’s southwest region, tannat and cabernet franc. One of the wines produced from Rhone-style grapes aged in glass containers outside for nine months, a process that drained color from the wine and added a slightly oxidized, sherry-like character. Whatever the case, I guarantee that you will be intrigued and fascinated, if not delighted by these wines, which are arranged in order of hue from left to right, as indicated by the image above.
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The Bonny Doon Vineyard Vin Gris de Cigare is always a favorite rosé in our 15_VinGris_Domestic_750house, and the version for 2015, carrying a Central Coast designation, is no different. A blend of 44 percent grenache grapes, 20 percent grenache blanc, 13 carignane, 10 mourvèdre, 7 cinsaut and 6 roussanne, the wine offers a hue of the most ineffable pale pink, like the blush on a nymph’s thigh, and delicate, breezy aromas of watermelon, raspberry, strawberry, thyme and wet flint. Crisp acidity keeps this rosé keen and lively, while its macerated red berry flavors make it delicious and easy to drink; a background of limestone provides structure. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through the end of 2016. Exquisite poise, balance and freshness. Excellent. About $18.
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Tuile is the French word for the curved roof-tiles ubiquitous in the South of France 14_SunWine_082415(and also the term for the curved cookies that resemble them). The pale orange-brick color of the Bonny Doon Vineyard Vin Gris Tuilé 2013, Central Coast, resembles the hue of those roofs, to some extent, but also refers to a relatively obscure practice of leaving young wine exposed to the elements to mature. Composed of 55 percent grenache grapes, 23 percent mourvèdre, 10 roussanne, 7 cinsaut, 3 carignane, 2 grenache blanc, this wine was left al fresco for nine months in glass demijohns or carboys; the result is a sherry-like wine that displays fresh and appealing aromas of almonds and orange peel, spiced tea, smoke and cloves. True to the red grapes from which it primarily originated — the grenache, mourvedre, cinsaut and carignane — the wine displays a rooty, foresty element that bolsters notes of spiced pear, hibiscus and apricot and an aura that’s altogether savory and saline. 13 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018 or ’19. Intriguing and ephemeral, but with real spine. Production was 192 cases. Excellent. About $26.
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Tracy Hills is a small AVA, approved in 2006 by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, that straddles San Joaquin and Stanislaus counties about 55 miles south-southeast of San Francisco in the Central Valley. The Bonny Doon Il Ciliegiolo Rosato 2015, Mt. Oso Vineyard, Tracy Hills, marks the first time I have seen this AVA on a label. The ciliegiolo grape, from the Italian for “cherry,” is related to sangiovese, but whether as a parent or off-spring is a matter of dispute. Made from 100 percent ciliegiolo grapes, this rosé exhibits a bright cerise hue and aromas of cherries, cherries, cherries in every form — fresh, dried, spiced and macerated — with notes of wild strawberries and raspberries, a flush of rhubarb and pomegranate, a hint of tomato skin. It’s a woodsy rosé, sun-drenched, a bit dusty, quite dry and delivering some graphite-tinged tannins from mid-palate through the finish. 12.4 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018. One of the more interesting and complex rosés I have encountered. Production was 442 cases. Excellent. About $24. (A release for the winery’s DEWN Club.)
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The Bonny Doon A Proper Pink 2015, California, joins the roster of the winery’s “Proper” brand, and while the wines are serious, the back-label verbiage is strictly faux-British tongue-in-cheek — and rather long-winded, old boy. Composed, unusually, of 61 percent tannat grapes and 39 percent cabernet franc, the wine offers a provocative cherry-red color shading to salmon; it’s a warm, sunny, fleshy rosé that features aromas of spiced and macerated raspberries and strawberries and notes of tomato leaf and almond skin; a few minutes in the glass bring in hints of briers, orange rind and sour melon candy. A lip-smacking texture is leavened by lively acidity and a dusty quality like damp roof tiles. 13 percent alcohol. Now through 2017. Very Good+. About $16.
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For this edition of Weekend Wine Notes, I offer a miscellaneous group of red wines from California, dominated by cabernet sauvignon, but with entries from the merlot and pinot noir camps. Truth is, I probably receive more samples of California cabernets to review than from any other region and any other grape variety. State-wide, today, we range from Russian River Valley in the north to Paso Robles in the south. As is usual in this series of Weekend Wine Notes, I dispense with the technical, historical, geographical and personal data that I dote on for the sake of incisive and, I hope, vivid reviews ripped, as it were, from the pages of my notebooks. These wines were samples for review. Enjoy, and always consume in moderation.
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2011_Aleksander
Aleksander 2011, Paso Robles. 13.3% alc. 80% merlot, 20% cabernet sauvignon. 840 cases. Glowing medium ruby color with a transparent magenta rim; a very impressive merlot exhibiting structural qualities of generous, supple tannins, clean acidity and ebon-like minerality; mint and thyme, lavender and violets, iron and iodine, black currants and raspberries with a trace of dark plum, smoky and dusty; a little resiny with notes of rosemary and cedar; lovely shape, tone and presence. Now through 2020 to 2023. Excellent. About $75.
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cage pinot
J. Cage Cellars Nunes Vineyard Pinot Noir 2014, Russian River Valley. 14.5% alc. 119 cases. Deep, vibrant ruby shading to lighter magenta; warm and spicy yet with a dark meditative aura; macerated red currants, cherries and plums, with a touch of cherry skin and pit; loam, briers and brambles; opens to notes of tar, violets and rose petals, pomegranate and sandalwood; a dense and sinewy pinot noir, enlivened by the influence of brisk acidity; elements of lithic dust, some root-like tea and a bare hint of orange rind. I’ll say, “Wow,” and “Please, bring on the seared duck breast.” Excellent. About $40.
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2013 Merlot-small
Ehlers Estate Merlot 2012, St. Helena, Napa Valley. 14.2% alc. With 8% cabernet franc. Opaque black-ruby shading to a vivid purple rim; very intense and concentrated, coiled power; black currants and plums infused with lavender, licorice and graphite; a scintillating core of granitic minerality that almost glitters, magnified by the wine’s bright acidity; lots of vibrancy and resonance, marred, unfortunately, by the taint of toasty oak that dominates from mid-palate back through the finish. You know what I always say, friends: If a wine smells like oak and tastes like oak, there’s too much damn oak. Now through 2020 to ’24. Very Good+. About $55.
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Ferrari-Carano Tresor 2012, Sonoma County. 14.5% alc. 71% cabernet sauvignon, 9% petit verdot, 7% each merlot and malbec, 6% cabernet franc. Dark ruby color with a tinge of magenta at the rim; warm and spicy but with a cool mineral core of graphite and iron; cassis, black raspberry and plum, with notes of cedar, lavender, violets, leather and loam; dusty, velvety tannins coat the palate midst intense and concentrated black fruit flavors and bastions of wheatmeal, walnut shell and burnished oak; how the finish manages not to be austere is a wonder. Try 2017 or ’18 through 2024 to ’28. Excellent. About $60.
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Geyser Peak Pluto’s Fury Pinot Noir 2013, Russian River Valley. 14.4% alc. 1,379 cases. Medium transparent ruby color; first come spice and herbs: cloves, sandalwood, sage; slightly macerated black cherries and red currants, touch of pomegranate and rhubarb; sleek, supple, lithe and satiny; generous with burgeoning elements of violets and rose petals; a well-made pinot noir that lavishes fruit and bright acidity on the palate. Now through 2017 or ’18. Very Good+. About $36.
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grgich merlot
Grgich Hills Estate Merlot 2012, Napa Valley. 14.9% alc. With 5% cabernet sauvignon. Dark ruby hue from stem to stern; rooty and loamy, with finely sifted elements of forest floor, dried porcini and graphite; ripe raspberry and black currant aromas inflected by seductive notes of mocha, black licorice, allspice and sandalwood; very intense and concentrated on the palate, framed by sturdy tannins that feel slightly sanded and roughened; after an hour or so, the tannins and oak flesh out and take over, giving the wine a formidable, monumental quality. No punk-ass little merlot here; this one is for the ages, or through 2024 to ’28. Excellent. About $43.
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Charles Krug Family Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Howell Mountain, Napa Valley. 15.2% alc. (!) 80% cabernet, 18% petit verdot, 2% merlot. Very dark ruby-purple with a bright violet rim; despite the soaring alcohol content, this is a beautifully balanced and harmonious wine, with perfect weight and presentation, yet plenty of structure for support and the long-haul; a full complement of dusty, graphite-laden tannins bolsters black currant, cherry and blueberry flavors inflected by notes of lavender, licorice, black tea and black olive; a few moments in the glass bring up hints of cedar, rosemary and tobacco; girt by a framework of granitic, mountain-side minerality, this classic cabernet is still a lovely drink, though built for aging through 2022 through 2028. Excellent. About $75.
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Mt. Brave Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Mt. Veeder, Napa Valley. 14.5% alc. (Jackson Family Wines) brave logoOpaque black-ruby with a glowing purple rim; a focused line of graphite and granite defines the space for elements of spiced, macerated and roasted black currants, cherries and plums, permeated by iodine and iron, mint and lavender; a feral, ferrous and sanguinary cabernet, somehow both velvety and chiseled, seductive and lithic; it’s mouth-filling, dynamic, impetuous. Try from 2017 or ’18 through 2027 to ’30. Excellent. About $75.
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signorello
Signorello Estate Padrone 2012, Napa Valley. With 9% cabernet franc. Whoa, what is up with this 15.8 percent alcohol? That factor dominates this wine and throws it off balance, though initially it reveals deep, brooding qualities of cassis, bitter chocolate, briers and brambles, leather and loam that might blossom into harmony; sadly, the austere tannins, the astringent oak and, above all, the sweet, hot alcohol demolish that hope. Not recommended. About $150.
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tongue dancer
Tongue Dancer Wines Pinot Noir 2013, Sonoma Coast. 14.5% alc. Production was 125 cases. Transparent medium ruby shading to an invisible rim; indelible and beguiling aromas of pomegranate and cranberry, red and black cherries and currants, anise and lavender, with bare hints of rhubarb, thyme and celery seed; a thread of loam and graphite runs through this wine’s supple satiny texture, creating a sense of superb weight and heft on the palate, yet expressing eloquent elegance and delicacy of effect. Now through 2018 to 2020. I could drink this pinot noir every day. Exceptional. About $45.
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Trione Vineyards and Winery River Road Ranch Pinot Noir 2013, Russian River Valley, Sonoma Trione-2012-Pinot-NoirCounty. 14.5% alc. 1,408 cases. Medium transparent ruby hue; dark and spicy with cloves and allspice (and a hint of the latter’s slightly astringent nature); black and red cherries and currants, notes of cranberries and pomegranate; turns exotic with violets, lavender, mint and sandalwood; a lively and engaging pinot noir, incredibly floral; a lithe texture, moderate oak with lightly sanded edges. Now through 2018 to ’21. Excellent. About $39.
The label image is one vintage behind.
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Young Inglewood Estate Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, St. Helena, Napa Valley. 14.8% alc. 612 cases. With some percentage of merlot and cabernet franc. Dark ruby color; redolent of graphite, iodine and mint, cassis and blueberry, cloves and sage and ancho chile; acidity that runs silent and deep through canyons of dusty, granitic tannins; plenty of spice and scintillating energy, gradually opens reservoirs of lavender, licorice and violets and stylish, polished oak that carries through the brooding but not austere finish. Touches all the moves in the Napa cabernet playbook — meaning that it’s an exemple rather than an individual — but still very impressive. Now through 2024 through ’28. Excellent. About $90.
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Gary Andrus founded Pine Ridge Vineyards in 1978, acquiring 50 acres, planted mainly to chardonnay vines, on the Silverado Trail in Stags Leap District. After planting cabernet sauvignon vines and purchasing other vineyards, logo-Pine-Ridge-VineyardsPine Ridge earned a reputation for its full-bodied, multi-dimensional cabernet sauvignon wines, as well as chardonnay and, later, a popular and inexpensive chenin blanc-viognier blend that pays the rent. Anders put the winery on the market in 2000, and it was purchased by The Crimson Wine Group, which also owns Archery Summit, in Oregon, and Seghesio, in Sonoma County. Pine Ridge owns vineyard acreage in many parts of Napa Valley, and produces limited bottlings of wines from these classic AVAs. Under review today are the examples from Rutherford, Oakville District and Stags Leap District. Rutherford and Oakville stretch across the central Valley floor, while Stags Leap, backing up to the Vaca Range, is hillier, even fairly steep in places.

These three wines receive the same oak regimen, 18 months in French oak, 60 percent new barrels, but it’s interesting that the blend on each is different, making accommodations to the vineyards and the landscape and micro-climates involved. Wimemaker and general manager is Michael Beaulac. These are stalwart — and expensive — cabernets, that seem to me to epitomize what makes Napa Valley cabernet sauvignon so well-known in the world of both casual drinkers and astute wine collectors: the sense of acute minerality; the poised and rugged tannins; the deep black fruit permeated by the unique combination of tea, dried herbs, loam and dust; the ultimate balance and integration, in the best years. The vintage in question here, 2012, though a warm year, is undeniably one of the best.

These wines were samples for review.
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The Pine Ridge Oakville Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Napa Valley, is a blend of 76 percent cabernet sauvignon and 24 percent petit verdot. With its intensity and concentration, its huge, dynamic lithic structure and its exquisite balance that paradoxically verges on elegance, this wine conforms to my ideal of an Oakville cabernet. The color is very dark ruby with a tinge of purple at the rim; taking some time to swirl the wine and sniff allows whiffs of black fruit shading to blue and dried meadow flowers to emerge, almost reluctantly it seems, while the big build-up is in the precincts of dust and graphite, iodine and iron. Still, tannins are plush on the palate, and the wine, despite its depth and dimension and the tautness of its acidity, flows through the mouth with lively aplomb. A wine that needs some time to open, though it would be tempting with a medium-rare strip steak, hot and crusty from the grill. Try from 2018 or ’20 through 2030 to ’34. Excellent. About $85.
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The Pine Ridge Rutherford Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Napa Valley, offers a dark ruby hue with a glowing magenta rim; the nose is distinguished by incisive graphite minerality that bears hints of iodine and iron, ancho chili and bitter chocolate, opening gradually to deeply spiced and macerated red and black currants and raspberries; these aromas take on an incredibly floral aspect, blending lavender, violets and lilacs with a twist of black licorice. Though rigorous in structure, supported by bastions of dry, dusty tannins, this Pine Ridge Rutherford Cabernet Sauvignon 2012 is lively, vital and vigorous, almost engaging, though a few minutes in the glass give it burgeoning depth and dimension; oak stays firmly on the periphery, yet the influence is undeniably there. The finish is long, dense and freighted with a kind of powdery granitic quality. The blend is 82 percent cabernet sauvignon, 15 percent malbec, 3 percent petit verdot. 14.8 percent alcohol. Try from 2017 or ’18 through 2028 to ’30. Excellent. About $85.
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PRV_CabSauv_StagsLeap_main
Stylistically, the Pine Ridge Stags Leap District Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Napa Valley, bears resemblance to its cousins also mentioned in this post but feels even denser, more stringent, bottomless, as if it siphoned up all the bedrock of the steep hillside vineyards where it was born. It’s a blend of 77 percent cabernet sauvignon, 20 percent cabernet franc and 3 percent malbec. The color, of course, is dark, almost opaque ruby that shades to a lighter mulberry rim; the bouquet is a stirring melange of graphite, tar, ancho chili and bitter chocolate, roasted fennel and ripe, macerated red and black currants and cherries; a bit of time brings in notes of cloves, sage and rosemary. Yes, it’s massive on the palate, deeply tannic, yet fleet of foot too, aided by plangent acidity and a deft touch with oak, which feels polished and lightly sanded. It will need a few years aging to bring out more of the black fruit flavors, so try from 2017 to ’19 through 2030 to ’35. 14.7 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $125.
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Today’s post is for My Readers in the Northeast, since wines produced on Long Island or New York state generally don’t receive extensive national distribution. And good luck finding New York wines on the lists of New York lieb logoCity’s fine restaurants, though the Lieb Cellars Reserve Cabernet Franc 2013, North Fork of Long Island, would be a great addition to any restaurant’s roster of wines. This is a blend of 75 percent cabernet franc, 12 percent cabernet sauvignon, 7 percent malbec, 4 percent merlot and 2 percent petit verdot that spent 10 months in Hungarian oak barrels. The color is glossy dark ruby with a glowing magenta rim; aromas of black cherries and currants are highlighted by notes of tobacco, blueberries and dark plums, briers and brambles and fleeting hints of violets, lavender and graphite; a few minutes in the glass bring in touches of smoky black olives and dried thyme. The wine’s dusty tannic firmness on the palate is softened by a supple, silky texture and bright acidity that bolster its spicy, bosky ripeness of black fruit flavors. 12.8 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2018 or ’19. Production was 234 cases. Excellent. About $40.

A sample for review.

We tend to know when a wine is great from the first sniff and taste, because it possesses that ineffable yet very real quality called charisma. Renewed sniffing and tasting confirm that assessment, while adding depth and character. These factors hold true whether a wine costs $19 or $350, the range represented in today’s 2015 edition of the annual “50 Great Wines” post. I wouldn’t pay $350 for a bottle of wine — though apparently some people would — but I appreciate the occasional opportunity to encounter one. Of the wines on today’s roster, 18 rate Exceptional and 32 rate Excellent. Often the dividing line between Excellent and Exceptional is fine indeed, with permutations and intimations running silent and deep in each direction, but since my inclination is toward distinctions, rankings and hierarchies — that’s what graduate school will do for you — I always include a rating for each wine reviewed on BTYH. On the other hand, I refuse to employ the famous 100-point system; I would rather leave room for some ambiguity and imagination.

A great wine satisfies every point of interest and essence that we desire from a wine, exuding a feeling of utter completion and comprehension. Each wine accomplishes this purpose in a different way, of course, and to varying degrees, necessitating different responses. Some of these wines I admire, gravely and humbly; others, I adore rather shamelessly. The ultimate test, I think, is that when we drink a bottle of great wine, our conclusion is thus: “I wouldn’t want it to be anything other than this,” a sentiment we might also share with works of art and love affairs.

Today’s roster is presented alphabetically. Where a wine is a blend of grapes, I include the percentages that compose the blend. I also mention the case production for wines released in limited quantities, of which many on this list, not surprisingly, are. I do not include alcohol levels or names of importers or technical, geographical or historical date That sort of information is available in the reviews. These wines were selected from examples that I wrote about during 2015. The preponderance were samples for review, for which I thank the wineries, importers and marketing people who sent them.

For whatever eccentricities this list of “50 Great Wines of 2015” embodies, blame them on my taste, knowledge, experience and intuition. That is all I — or any of us — have to go on.
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achaval-ferrer-CMendoza-2013
Achaval Ferrer Cabernet Sauvignon 2013, Mendoza, Argentina. Excellent. About $25.
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valadorna 09
Arcanum Valadorna 2009, Toscana IGT, Italy. 85 percent merlot, 8 percent cabernet franc, 7 percent cabernet sauvignon. Exceptional. About $80.

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Argyle Nuthouse Riesling 2013, Eola-Amity Hills, Oregon. Exceptional. About $30.
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sangioveto
Badia a Coltibuono Sangioveto di Toscana 2009, Toscana IGT, Italy. 100 percent sangiovese. 750 cases. Excellent. About $60.
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Benovia-2013-Russian-River-Valley-Pinot-Noir
Benovia Pinot Noir 2013, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. Excellent. About $38.
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occultumlapidem2012us
Bila-Haut Occultum Lapidem 2013, Côtes du Roussillon Villages Latour de France. 50 percent syrah, 40 percent grenache, 10 percent carignan. Excellent. About $30.
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BlackKite
Black Kite Cellars Stony Terrace Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County. 200 cases. Excellent. About $60. (Not exactly the correct label, but this is what they look like.)
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terras gauda
Bodegas Terras Gauda O Rosal 2014, Rias Baixas, Spain. 70 percent albariño, 15 percent loureiro, 15 percent caiño blanco. Excellent. About $24.
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Riesling
Chateau Montelena Riesling 2014, Potter Valley. Excellent, About $25.
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Weingut Clemens Busch Grauen Schiefer Riesling Trocken 2012, Mosel, Germany. Excellent. About $30.
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Concha y Toro Terrunyo Los Boldos Vineyard Block 5 Sauvignon Blanc 2012, Casablanca Valley, Chile. Excellent. About $26.
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cornerstone 11
Cornerstone Cellars The Cornerstone 2011, Napa Valley. 85 percent cabernet sauvignon, 10 percent merlot, 5 percent cabernet franc. 100 cases. About $150.
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duckhorn merlot
Duckhorn Vineyards Merlot 2012, Napa Valley. With 7 percent cabernet sauvignon, 2 percent cabernet franc, 1 percent malbec. Excellent. About $54.
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ehlers
Ehlers Estate Sylvanie Cabernet Franc Rosé 2014, St. Helena, Napa Valley. Exceptional. About $28.
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FEL Savoy Vineyard Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County. 645 cases. Excellent. About $65.
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Foursight Jpeg Logo
Foursight Wines Charles Vineyard Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County. 224 cases. Excellent. About $46.
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FINAL 2013 ESS LABELb
Grgich Hills Estate Miljenko’s Selection Essence Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Napa Valley. 1,204 cases. Exceptional. About $55.
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Grgich Hills Estate Miljenko’s Selection Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Napa Valley. 485 cases. Exceptional. About $90.
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inman-rose
Inman Family Endless Crush Rosé of Pinot Noir 2014, Russian River Valley, Sonoma County. 1,500 cases. Excellent. About $25.
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iron-horse-brut-x
Iron Horse Brut “X” 2010, Green Valley of Russian River Valley. 69 percent pinot noir, 31 percent chardonnay. 500 cases. Excellent. About $50.
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jacquard
Champagne Jacquart Brut Rosé nv. 53 percent pinot noir, 35 percent chardonnay, 12 percent pinot meunier. Excellent. About $55.
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La Jota Vineyard Co. W.S. Keyes Vineyards Merlot 2010, Napa Valley. 296 cases. Exceptional. About $50.
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cuvee rose
Champagne Laurent-Perrier Cuvee Rosé Brut nv. 100 percent Grand Cru pinot noir. Excellent. About $99.
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laurent 2006
Champagne Laurent-Perrier Brut Millesime 2006. Excellent. About $65.
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lokoya
Lokoya Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Mount Veeder, Napa Valley. Exceptional. About $350.
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ember-site
Loomis “Ember” Red Wine 2012, Napa Valley. Syrah, grenache, mourvedre. 75 cases. Excellent. About $38.
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maggy
Maggy Hawk “Afleet” Pinot Noir 2012, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County. 156 cases. Exceptional. About $66.

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MFW_Rose_Face
MacPhail Family Wines Rosé of Pinot Noir 2014, Sonoma Coast. 492 cases. Exceptional. About $22.
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Marco Abella Loidana 2010, Priorat, Spain. 60 percent grenache, 25 percent carignane, 15 percent cabernet sauvignon. Excellent. About $30.
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mccay zin
McCay Cellars “Trulux” Zinfandel 2012, Lodi. 479 cases. Excellent. About $32.
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mcintyre
McIntyre Vineyards Estate Pinot Noir 2013, Santa Lucia Highlands, Monterey County. 368 cases. Exceptional. About $42.
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Morgan_2012_Double_L_Chardonnay
Morgan Winery Double L Vineyard Chardonnay 2012, Santa Lucia Highlands, Monterey County. 530 cases. Exceptional. About $42.
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beautiful pinot gris
Mt Beautiful Pinot Gris 2014, North Canterbury, New Zealand. 1,500 cases. Exceptional. About $19.
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Pahlmeyer and Jayson Wines Line Up
Pahlmeyer Merlot 2012, Napa Valley. Exceptional. About $85.
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pfendler
Pfendler Pinot Noir 2013, Sonoma Coast. 350 cases. Excellent. About $45.
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post and vine
Post & Vine Testa Vineyard Old Vine Field Blend 2012, Mendocino County. 42 percent zinfandel, 37 percent carignane, 21 percent petite sirah. 143 cases. Excellent. About $28.
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quivira zin
Quivira Zinfandel 2012, Dry Creek Valley, Sonoma County. With 10 percent petite sirah, 1 percent carignane. Excellent. About $26.
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innocent
St. Innocent Freedom Hill Vineyard Pinot Noir 2012, Willamette Valley, Oregon. 948 cases. Exceptional. About $42.
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sequoia grove cab
Sequoia Grove Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Napa Valley. With 11 percent cabernet franc, 10 percent merlot, 1 percent each petit verdot and malbec. Excellent. About $38.
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smith madrone 11
Smith-Madrone Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Spring Mountain District, Napa Valley. 1,070 cases. Excellent. About $45.
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tonella sb
S.R. Tonella Cellars Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Rutherford, Napa Valley. Excellent. About $29.
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2014EstateSauvBlanc
Stonestreet Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Alexander Valley, Sonoma County. Exceptional. About $35.

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tanner dafoe
Tanner Dafoe Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Santa Ynez Valley, Santa Barbara County. 141 cases. Exceptional. About $110.

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taylor
Taylor Fladgate Vargellas Vintage Porto 2012, Portugal. Exceptional. About $53.
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joon
Tin Barn “Joon” Coryelle Fields Vineyard Rosé of Syrah 2014, Sonoma Coast. 158 cases. Excellent. About $23.
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torre
Torre San Martino Vigna della Signore 2013, Colli di Faenza Bianco, Italy. Chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, albana grapes. Excellent. $NA.
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two shepherds logo
Two Shepherds Grenache Rosé 2014, Sonoma Coast. 90 cases. Exceptional. About $24.
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Vietti Castiglione Barolo 2011, Piedmont, Italy. 100 percent nebbiolo grapes. Excellent. About $50.
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Chateau Villa Bel-Air 2013, Graves, Bordeaux. 65 percent sauvignon blanc, 35 percent semillon. Excellent. About $25.
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2012-Jordan-PN-300x207
Youngberg Hill Jordan Block Pinot Noir 2012, Willamette Valley. 300 cases. Excellent. About $50.
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The Spire Collection comprises the top products in the expansive stable of Jackson Family Wines. These are limited edition wines, generally from specific AVAs, carefully made, aged with primarily new French oak barrels and priced accordingly. The Spire Collection labels are Anakota (Knights Valley); Arcanum (Tuscany); Capensis (Western Cape, South Africa); Capture (Sonoma County); Cardinale (Napa Valley); Cyneth (Napa Valley); Chateau Lessegue (Saint-Emilion, Bordeaux); Chateau Vignot (Saint-Emilion, Bordeaux); Galerie carpenter(Napa Valley); Hickinbotham (McLaren Vale, South Australia); La Jota Vineyard (Napa Valley); Lokoya (Napa Valley); Maggy Hawk (Mendocino County); Mt. Brave (Napa Valley); Verite (Sonoma County);Windracer (Russian River Valley, Sonoma County). Today we look at red wines from La Jota, Lokoya and Mt. Brave, made by Chris Carpenter, pictured at right. He is also the winemaker for Cardinale, the 2011 version of which I reviewed back in January (here) and Hickinbotham, whose wines I will save for a later post; I mean, Australia is so far away from Napa Valley, and I want to stick to a theme.

The wines of La Jota, Lokoya and Mt. Brave, products of mountainside vineyards, are true vins de garde, that is, wines intended for long aging, in the case of some of these from 10 to 15 years or more, yet they are — conforming to the California ideal — accessible at a fairly young age too. They are wines of character, serious and highly structured but not ponderous, dignified but not aloof. With prices ranging from $75 to $350 a bottle, a legitimate question is, who buys these wines? Who even cares that they exist, in their limited quantities? Loyoka doesn’t even have an online function to purchase its wines; the best one can hope for is to add your name to an allocation list.

The desirability of these wines is not merely an effect of their price and rarity, however. These are great — to use a subjective term — wines that deserve to be in the cellars of anyone who collects such products. As for the rest of us, well, I wouldn’t have access to them either if I weren’t a veteran wine-writer, and I don’t hesitate to say that I enjoyed the hell out of them.

These notes are a combination of tasting samples for review at home and tasting wines in Napa Valley in March this year.
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La Jota Vineyard Co. dates back to 1898, when Swiss immigrant Frederick Hess purchased 327 acres of George Yount’s Rancho La Jota land grant on Howell Mountain. (The jota is a Spanish folk-dance, in 3/4 or 6/8 time, that achieved broad popularity in the mid 18th Century.) Within a few years, La Jota wines were winning awards at national and international competitions. Phylloxera and Prohibition put an end to the winery’s accomplishments, and the estate did not see a revival until 1974, when the original stone winery and 40 surrounding acres were bought by former oilman Bill Smith and his wife Joan. They planted new vines and added acreage, developed several new varieties and were instrumental in persuading what was then the BATF to declare Howell Mountain a separate American Viticultural Area within Napa Valley. In 2001, Smith sold La Jota to Markham Vineyards and its parent company Mercian Corp. The late Jesse Jackson and his wife Barbara Banke acquired La Jota in 2005.
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La Jota Vineyard Co. W.S. Keyes Vineyard Merlot 2010, Napa Valley. 14.2% alc. 82% merlot, 18% cabernet sauvignon. 19 months French oak, 85% new barrels. W.S. Keyes Vineyard, planted in 1888, lies at 1,825 feet elevation on Howell Mountain. Very dark ruby hue with a slightly lighter rim; first note: “just beautiful”; quite rich, ripe and intense but without being opulent or overpowering; cloves and sandalwood, black cherries, currants and raspberries with a wild flash of blueberries; bitter chocolate, cedar, tobacco and mocha; wonderful balance and integration of all elements: dusty, supple tannins, spicy fruit, burnished wood, bright acidity and graphite-tinged minerality, all poised with real depth and precision. Drink now through 2020 to ’24. Production was 296 cases. Exceptional. About $150.
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La Jota Howell Mountain Merlot 2011, Napa Valley. 14.5% alc. 95% merlot, 5% cabernet sauvignon. 19 months French oak, 97% new barrels. Dark ruby with a magenta rim; laser beam concentration of ripe black cherry, current and raspberry scents and flavors; bitter chocolate and lavender, cloves and graphite; bright acidity with tremendous resonance and pinpoint balance; finish packed with granitic minerals, walnut-shell and dusty tannins. Now through 2022 to ’25. Excellent. About $75.
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La Jota Howell Mountain Cabernet Franc 2011, Napa Valley. 14.5% alc. 96% cabernet franc, 4% cabernet sauvignon. 19 months French oak, 96% new barrels. Opaque ruby-purple hue; cedar and tobacco leaf, rosemary and pine resin; intense black currant with wild notes of blueberry and raspberry; opens to hints of black olive, oolong tea, white pepper and allspice; dense, dusty tannins, lithe, sinewy texture that’s tight but doesn’t stint on generosity. Now through 2022 to ’25. Excellent. About $75.
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La Jota Howell Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Napa Valley. 14.5% alc. 82% cabernet sauvignon, 8% merlot, 6% cabernet franc, 4% petit verdot. 19 months in French oak, 91% new barrels. Dark ruby with a magenta rim; graphite and granite, iodine and iron; traces of lavender and violet, bitter chocolate and dusty sage; tannin treads the fine line where strict rigor dissolves into dusty velvet; gradually adds ripe black currants, raspberries and blueberries; austere finish needs time to mellow, though it would be tremendous now with a medium rare strip steak. Try through 2022 to ’25. Excellent. About $75.
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La Jota Howell Mountain Cabernet Franc 2012, Napa Valley. 14.5% alc. 100% cabernet franc. 20 months French oak, 81% new barrels. Dark ruby with a vivid magenta rim; bushy and brushy black and red currants, touches of plums, blueberries, notes of cedar, black olives and cloves; lithic structure, plenty of graphite; tannins feel dusty, polished, slightly sanded; also plenty of oak but well-balanced and integrated; robust without being rustic, packs a lot of power into a vibrant package. Drink through 2020 or ’24. Excellent. About $75.
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La Jota Howell Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon 2012, Napa Valley. 14.5% alc. 77% cabernet sauvignon, 11% cabernet franc, 8% petit verdot, 4% merlot. 20 months French oak, 89% new barrels. Dark ruby with a violet rim; walnut shell, wheatmeal and graphite, focus on structure but firmness etched with deeply spicy black currants, raspberries and plums; notes of lavender, mocha and bitter chocolate; briery and brambly on the one hand, sleek and chiseled on the other, dry and granitic, with fissures of black olive and bell pepper; heaps of presence and energy. Try 2017 or ’18 through 2025 to ’30. Excellent. About $75.
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Mt. Brave, named for the Wappo Indians — “the brave ones” — who inhabited the area, was founded in 2007 to exploit the terroir of the former 30-plus-acre Chateau Potelle property that Jess Jackson and Barbara Banke purchased that year.
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Mt. Brave Merlot 2011, Mount Veeder, Napa Valley. 14.5% alc. 80% merlot, 20% cabernet sauvignon. 19 months in French oak, 80% new barrels. Deep ruby-purple color; a dusty, dusky, lithic rooty wine, offering heaps of graphite and a distinctive earthy quality; also layers of ripe black cherry and plum fruit with notes of spicy pomegranate and blueberry; blossoms with a generous wafting of perfume — violets and lavender, incense and heather; lithe and supple texture supported by velvety tannins and vibrant acidity; a long, dense, slightly austere finish. Drink now through 2022 to ’25. Excellent. About $75.
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Mt. Brave Malbec 2011, Mount Veeder, Napa Valley. 14.5% alc. 100% malbec. 19 months French oak, 70% new barrels. Lustrous black as motor oil with a purple-violet sheen; a darkly gorgeous malbec, seething with notes of blueberry and boysenberry, though not over-ripe or cloying; deeply infused with structural elements of graphite, wheatmeal and walnut shell; opens to hints of black cherry and plum, iodine and iron, cloves and violets, a touch of cherry tart; tannins are dense and chewy, robust, and acidity cuts a path on the palate. Quite a performance. Now through 2021 to ’25. Excellent. About $75.
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Mt. Brave Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Mount Veeder, Napa Valley. 14.5% alc. 94% cabernet sauvignon, 3% each merlot and cabernet frnac. 19 months French oak, 91% new barrels. All right, this is the Big One, very dark and inky in every respect; you sense the mountain roots, the chthonic stirrings in its depths of brushy, briery tannins, fleet acidity and grantic minerality; yet — there’s always a yet — the wine also feels like classic Napa Valley cabernet, sleek, chiseled, almost elegant in its presentation and delicious with a wide-ranging complement of cassis, black cherry and blueberry scents and flavors, with notes of cedar, tobacco, mocha and lavender. Another great package. Now through 2022 to ’25. Excellent. About $75.
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Lokoya was founded in 1995. The wines are 100 percent cabernet sauvignon and originate in high-altitude vineyards in the Mount Veeder, Howell Mountain, Diamond Mountain District and Spring Mountain District AVAs. I have tasted only the Mount Veeder version.
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lokoya
Lokoya Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, Mount Veeder, Napa Valley. 14.5% alc. 100% cabernet sauvignon. Oak regimen was 21 months in French oak, 99% new barrels, a tad finicky perhaps — what difference would one more percent make? — but this winemaker knows what he’s doing. Very dark ruby-mulberry hue; incredible purity and intensity, deep focus and concentration; dusty graphite and granitic qualities that reach far into the depths but allow for the burgeoning of floral notes — lavender and violets — coffee and mocha, black current and blueberry fruit with a wild, high trace of black cherry; a few moments in the glass bring in hints of cloves and sandalwood; the finish — as expected — long, dense, sleek and a bit austere. Tremendous presence, dimension, power and resonance. Now through 2025 to ’30. Exceptional. About $350.
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It’s not too early to think about wines for Thanksgiving dinner, so let’s get to it. Today I’m recommending a red wine that may be off touraine-tradition-rouge-caves-monmousseauthe maps for most American consumers but really deserves their attention. The Justin Monmousseau Touraine Tradition 2012 hails from the region of Touraine in France’s central Loire Valley. The house of Monmouuseau, founded in 1886 by Alcide Monmousseau, devotes 70 percent of its production to sparkling wines from a range of Loire Valley AOCs, all made in the méthode traditionnelle, but fortunately the estate also produces still red and white wines. The Monmousseau Touraine Tradition 2012 is a blend of 69 percent côt grapes (malbec); 30 percent cabernet franc; and a bare 1 percent gamay, fermented and aged only in stainless steel vats. The result is a wine with tremendous liveliness and elevation that offers a medium ruby color shading to a violet hue and penetrating aromas of ripe, fleshy blackberries, black cherries and plums, permeated by black pepper and allspice, underbrush and loam. The wine displays a lovely, bright structure on the palate, with fruit that leans toward well-spiced blackberry and blueberry flavors and — the effect of that mere dollop of gamay — an irresistible vivacious note of wild red raspberries, with that characteristic brambly, leafy element, this generous panoply upheld by an influx of dusty tannins. NA% alcohol, but not high. Serve slightly chilled and drink up with pleasure. Very Good+. About $16.

Tasted at a private wine event.

The Jackson family acquired the Arcanum estate, a 2,500-acre property in Tuscany, in 1994. Of that land, 223 acres are planted in arcanum_l1vines. The property is located at the southeast corner of the Chianti Classico region, near the city of Siena. (Jackson Family Wines also owns an estate in the Chianti Classico zone, Tenuta di Arceno.) No traditional Tuscan grapes are grown at Arcanum — I mean sangiovese; the focus is on cabernet franc and merlot, as if we were in St.-Emilion, that Right Bank appellation of Bordeaux famed for its wines based on those grapes. Cabernet sauvignon plays a minority position in these wines, and what’s also interesting is that all three age in French oak barrels only for a year. Winemaker is Pierre Seillan, yes, a Frenchman in Tuscany, who also makes the wine at Chateau Lassègue, Jackson Family Wines’ outpost in St.-Emilion, and at its Vérité estate in Sonoma County. The cultivated areas of Arcanum are divided into 63 small blocks of vineyard that range in elevation from 1,000 to 1,500 feet above sea level, each treated as a representative of its minute differences in micro-climate and soil. These are splendid wines, replete with authority, confidence and personality. I was especially taken with the merlot-dominate Valadorna 2009, though picking a favorite among these three is an exercise in folly. I use the phrase intense and concentrated in each of these reviews, a factor for which I will not apologize, because it summarizes the dense, substantial, coiled and slightly esoteric nature of the wines.
Sovereign Wine Imports, Santa Rosa, Calif. These wines were samples for review.
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Il fauno is the cadet of the trio of wines produced by this estate, which is not to imply that there’s anything inchoate or faunosecondary about it. The blend for Il fauno di Arcanum 2010, Toscana I.G.T., is 56 percent merlot, 23 percent cabernet franc, 20 percent cabernet sauvignon and a bare 1 percent petit verdot; the wine spent a year in French oak barriques. The color is dark ruby shading to medium ruby at the rim; the bouquet mounts a wonderful evocation of dried black and blue fruit, flowers and spices in a heady and exotic amalgam pointed with graphite, lavender, roasted fennel, rosemary and that herb’s redolent resiny note. It’s quite a dry wine, and you feel the effect of spicy oak, dusty tannins and vibrant acidity all the way to the inky bottom, though that character does not negate the presence of intense and concentrated black currant, blueberry and plum flavors. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink now — with a medium-rare ribeye steak, hot and crusty from the grill — through 2020 or ’22. Excellent. About $30.
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Valadorna 2009, Toscana I.G.T, is a blend of 85 percent merlot, 8 percent caberet franc and 7 percent cabernet sauvignon; it aged in valadorna 09French oak barrels, 40 percent new, for 12 months. If only all merlot-based wines displayed this sort of integrity and character. The deep ruby hue seems to reflect the wine’s ferrous and sanguinary nature, its fleshy iodine and iron qualities; again, I’ll deploy the words intense and concentrated, not in the sense of tightly wound or unyielding but in the way of saying that it feels as if there’s more there packed into the wine then should be there by rights. Black and red currants and raspberries are deeply dyed with cloves, allspice — with the latter’s slight astringent element — lavender and licorice and notes of sage, espresso and ancho chile. Formidable tannins feel dusty, granitic and fathomless, while acidity strikes a spark through the whole resonant package. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink now or wait a year or two through 2021 through 2025. Exceptional. About $80.
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Arcanum is the flagship wine of the estate, a true vin de garde denoting dignity, station and longevity. Arcanum 2009, arcanumToscana I.G.T., combines 68 percent cabernet franc, 22 percent merlot and 10 percent cabernet sauvignon in a wine that aged 12 months in French oak barriques, 70 percent new. The color is dark ruby, opaque at the center, shading to mulberry at the rim; the wine’s primary attributes revolve around structure in the form of stalwart, lithic yet not hard tannins; blazing but not raw acidity; and a sense of dusty, spicy burnished wood. In addition to the familiar qualities of iodine and iron, Arcanum 09 displays loamy, briery and brambly attributes that grow more rigorous as the moments pass — I mean when you’re 30 to 40 minutes into the wine — and its dry, intense and concentrated nature barely opens to encourage notes of mocha and cocoa powder, white pepper and bay leaf, licorice and lavender and a pass at black and blue fruit flavors; there’s a tinge of cabernet franc’s blueberry, black olive and leather character. 14.5 percent alcohol. Try from the end of 2016 or into 2017 through 2027 to 2030. Excellent. About $100.
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