Burgundy


Domaine Jessiaume must be unique in Burgundy. Its owner, Keith Murray, is a Scot. Its director, Megan McClure, is American. And the cote de beaunewinemaker is a Frenchman with a Belgian surname, William Waterkeyn. The domaine, headquartered in Santenay (population 836), consists of 9 hectares of Premier Cru and Village vineyard– slightly more than 22 acres — located in Santenay, Beaune, Pommard, Volnay and Auxey-Duresses, all in the Côte de Beaune region. Côte de Beaune is the southern half of the narrow ridge that is Burgundy, the northern part being the Côte de Nuits. Because the soil of the Côte de Beaune is more varied, more white wine is made there than in the Côte de Nuits, which is about 90 percent red. The grapes, of course, are chardonnay and pinot noir. The Murray family acquired Domaine Jessiaume from the seventh generation of its founders in 2007. The work to improve the estate includes eliminating the negociant arm and gradually shifting into total organic farming. Only native yeasts are employed, and new oak is held to a minimum. These three wines — samples for review — represent what I love most about the pinot noirs of Burgundy, a sense of delicacy married to purity of fruit and intensity of structure. The prices are irresistible. When many Premier Cru wines, admittedly from illustrious appellations, now cost $75 to $200, these models can be had for $42 and $45. They are more than worth the prices. The wines of Domaine Jessiaume are imported to this country by MS Walker, Norwood Mass.
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Domaine Jessiaume Santenay Premier Cru La Comme 2014 aged 12 months in French oak, 33 percent new barrels, followed by 3 months in santenaystainless steel tanks. It displays an absolutely beautiful limpid, transparent medium ruby hue and scents and flavors of red cherries and currants; it’s quite dry but juicy with spice-inflected red fruit and enticing with an ethereal presence that does not discount a burgeoning tide of brambly-foresty tannins and fleet acidity that cuts a swath through the lithe, supple texture. The balance is lovely, with an emphasis on spareness and elegance. 13 percent alcohol. Production was 73 cases. Now through 2021 to’24. Excellent. About $42.
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Slightly less oak goes into making the Domaine Jessiaume Auxey-Duresses Premier Cru Les Ecussaux 2014 than was used in the previous auxeywine, that is, 12 months, 29 percent new French barrels, following by three months in stainless steel. The color is a totally transparent medium ruby hue; the wine features notes of red and black cherries and currants, lightly inflected with cloves, briers and brambles and a hint of loam. The wine is bright and lively, offering pert black and red fruit highlighted by touches of melon and sour cherry in a lithe, sinewy, vibrant structure. The sense is of innate energy and dimension held in check by the limitless powers of charm and delicacy. 13 percent alcohol. Now through 2019 to ’22. Production was 174 cases. Very Good+. About $42.
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For three more dollars, you get, in the Domaine Jessiaume Beaune Premier Cru Les Cent Vignes 2014, a wine that I consider the epitome of beaunethe Burgundian style. Nothing over-extracted here, nothing emphatic, fat or fleshy or overdone, but the perfection of balance between power and elegance, between the ethereal and the earthy. The wine spent 15 months in French oak, 25 percent new barrels, followed by two months in stainless steel. The color is a ravishing, ephemeral ruby-mulberry hue; red and black cherries and currants feel permeated by notes of briers, brambles and loam, with a hint of cloves and a touch of ground cumin that lends an air of intrigue. The wine is lithe, sinewy and silky smooth on the palate, where acidity cuts a swath and it flirts with a ferrous-sanguinary character. A sense of the granitic vineyard pulses through the wine, giving it a quality of precisely measured and honed dynamism that animates the finish. 13.5 percent alcohol. I could drink this one every night, but only 300 cases were produced. Best from 2018 or ’19 through 2028 to ’30. Excellent. About $45.
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Valentine’s, the most fraught day of the year, when everybody in America is going to be as romantic as hell or die trying, and what’s more loveromantic than that? In case you — meaning any person of whatever gender fluidity, age, religion, political stance, food preference or IQ — forgot to lay in a bottle of Champagne or sparkling wine, here is a brief roster of examples, all Brut Rosés, that register at various levels of delectability on the palate and dent-free on the pocketbook; in other words, delicious and not too expensive. (I understand that “expensive” is a relative concept.) Though actual Champagne is not included here, that is, bubbly made exclusively in the Champagne region of France, these models are produced in the famed “Champagne method” of second fermentation in the bottle, the same bottle it will be sold in, after some length of time resting on the lees in said bottle before being finished with the cork and wire. The process is a tad more complicated, of course, but I’m into simplification today so I can get a bottle of sparkling wine into your hands before it’s too late. Two of these selections are from France — Loire Valley and Burgundy — and two from California — Russian River and Napa-Carneros. So, drink up, have fun, dance a step or two and give him or her or him/her a smooch for me.

Credit: Leslie Barron, Big Love, acrylic and mixed media on panel, 24 by 48 inches. Courtesy of L Ross Gallery, Memphis, Tennessee.
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De Chanceny Brut Rosé nv, Crémant de Loire, is a product of Alliance Loire, a cooperative founded in 2002 to take advantage of vineyard 17385--de-chanceny-cremant-de-loire-rose-brut-label-1426983098connections that range from Muscadet in the west to the appellations of Touraine in the center. This is 100 percent cabernet franc, aged on the lees at least 12 months. The color is an attractive pale copper-salmon hue, enlivened by a steady stream of tiny bubbles. Aromas of strawberry and raspberry are touched with the slight astringency of mulberry, fleshed out by orange zest and a hint of cloves. This Crémant de Loire is dry, crisp and lively, animated by pert acidity and a deft limestone edge. 12.5 percent alcohol. Truly charming. Very Good+. I paid $15 locally, but prices around the country vary from about $13 to $19; don’t pay that much, My Readers.

Signature Imports, Mansfield, Mass.
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Founded in 1831, Domaine Albert Bichot produces Burgundy wines that encompass the complete geographical and hierarchical aspects of the region. Today, however, we look not at any of the domaine’s Premier Cru and Grand Cru wines but at its quite satisfying non-vintage Albert Bichot Brut Rosé Crémant de Bourgogne, composed of chardonnay, pinot noir and gamay grapes. The color is pale copper-pink, the essential bubbles active and energetic. Notes of blood orange, cloves, tangerine and red cherry are given a serious touch by an element of limestone minerality. It’s quite dry but displays lovely bones and a deceptive quality of tensile strength. 12 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $25.

European Wine Imports, Cleveland, Ohio. A sample for review.
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The J Vineyard Brut Rosé nv, Russian River Valley, is a blend of 66 percent pinot noir, 33 percent chardonnay and 1 percent pinot meunier; it aged two years en tirage, that is, on the lees in the bottle. This is all flushes, blushes and nuances, from its very pale copper-sunset hue, to its slightly fleshy, subtly ripe notes of orange zest, raspberry and lemon rind touched with almond skin, to its steely, chiseled structure. The bubbles, however, are nothing discrete, being a dynamic upward surge like a fountain. This sparkling wine is elegant and fine-boned, finishing with an intriguing hint of grapefruit bitterness. 12.5 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $45.

A sample for review.
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The Frank Family Vineyard Brut Rosé 2012, Napa Valley-Carneros, a blend of 76 percent pinot noir and 24 percent chardonnay, offers a pale copper hue flushed with rose-petal pink; the tiny bubbles teem like a glinting tempest in the glass. This is a focused and intense sparkling wine that displays burnished notes of blood orange and tangerine, red raspberries and currants wrapped in a package of lightly toasted brioche and limestone steeliness, managing to be both generous and austere. Lip-smacking acidity and effervescence and scintillating minerality keep it appealing and dynamic, while innate elegance makes it lithe and attractive. 12 percent alcohol. Production was 500 cases. Drink through 2019 to ’21. Excellent. About $55.

A sample for review.
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The sparkling wine Crémant de Bourgogne may be made from any of the grape varieties allowed in Burgundy, meaning predominantly chardonnay, aligoté and pinot noir, but including gamay and pinot blanc. The product must be fashioned in the “Champagne method” of second fermentation cremant de bourgogne mapin the bottle it’s sold in. The Crémant de Bourgogne appellation is extensive, reaching from Chablis down through Burgundy proper, Chalonnaise, Mâconnais and Beaujolais and encompassing 365 communes in four départménts. Grapes intended for Crémant de Bourgogne are generally cultivated separately from grapes that go into the great village, Premier Cru and Grand Cru wines of Burgundy and Chablis; that land is too precious and those grapes too expensive to sideline into sparkling wine, though that was often the practice at great estates before 1975, when the appellation regulations were laid down. Until 1975, the product was known as Borgogne Mousseux. A great deal of Crémant de Bourgogne is produced by cooperatives or by estates that specialize in effervescence; on the other hand, some of Burgundy’s best-known domaines, such as Yves Boyer-Martenot, Duc de Magenta and Jean-Noel Gagnard, still engage in the practice. In truth, many domaines are so small that they don’t have room for producing Crémant.

The house we look at today is Domaine Louis Picamelot, founded in 1926 in Rully, a village — population about 600 — in the Côte Chalonnaise. The domaine is still in family hands, in the third generation, but run by sons-in-law. Picamelot draws chardonnay, aligoté and pinot noir grapes from its own 10 hectares of vineyards in Côte Chalonnaise and Côte de Beaune but also from vineyards under long-term contracts reaching from Beaujolais to Chatillonnais, a region (not an appellation) lying between Chablis and the Côte d’Or that contributes heavily to Crémant de Bourgogne. I found the four examples from Picamelot reviewed here to be beautifully made, very sophisticated and mostly worthy of giving lower-priced Champagne — or higher-priced, for that matter — a run for its money. The sparkling wines of Domaine Louis Picamelot are imported by Ansonia Wines, Newton, Massachusetts. These wines were samples for review. Map of Crémant de Bourgogne from bourgogne-wines.com, a very informative website.
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The medium straw-gold Louis Picamelot Le Terroirs Brut, nv, Crémant de Bourgogne, is a blend of 57 percent pinot noir, 32 percent chardonnay and 11 percent aligoté, aged at least 12 months on the lees. Elements of limestone and seashell surround notes of baked lemons and pears that open to stone-fruit compote, cloves, heather and toffee; it’s surprisingly dense and viscous on the palate, gathering an array of mineral-tinged textural elements and glimpses of yellow fruit that neatly balance bright acidity with a slightly creamy nature. 12 percent alcohol. Very Good+. About $24.
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Made from 100 percent pinot noir grapes, the Louis Picamelot Les Terroirs Brut Rosé, nv, Crémant de Bourgogne, aged at least 12 months in the bottle on the lees; the grapes came from vineyards in the Côte Chalonnaise. The color is pale salmon-copper; energetic bubbles stream upward in a steady surge. Aromas of raspberry, peach and orange peel open to hints of raspberry leaf and cinnamon bread, over a limestone and steel character; on the palate, this is fine-boned and tensile, slightly briery, clean and elegant while offering a dynamic veracity of bright acid and a scintillating mineral element. 12 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $24.
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The Louis Picamelot Terroir de Chazot Blanc de Noir Brut, nv, Crémant de Bourgogne, is also 100 percent pinot noir, this from a designated vineyard situated on the higher hillsides of St. Aubin in the Côte de Beaune. It aged at least 18 months in the bottle on the lees. The color is very pale straw-gold, while the persistent stream of tiny bubbles is satisfying and exhilarating. Notes of roasted lemon and pear nectar open to hints of tangerine and lime peel, almond skin and lightly buttered cinnamon toast and a sort of fragile seashell-limestone element of chiseled minerality. That honed and hewn quality persists on the palate, where its chalk and flint character defines a spare, elegant package of lovely nuance and subtlety. 12 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $30.
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The Louis Picamelot Cuvée Jean Baptiste Chautard Brut 2012, Crémant de Bourgogne, is a blend of 77 percent chardonnay and 23 percent aligoté, qualifying as a blanc de blancs. A pale gold hue is animated by a teeming torrent of frothing bubbles; it’s a clean, spare, elegant sparkling wine that features notes of roasted lemons and spiced pears with undertones of quince and ginger, chalk and lightly toasted brioche. This builds character and substance in the glass, layering pertinent limestone minerality with brisk acidity and hints of baked stone-fruit flavors, all wrapped in a lively effervescent nature that doesn’t emphasize any element unduly; balanced yet exciting. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2020 or ’22. Excellent. About $38.
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Well, actually, in this post I’m going to omit Champagne — of which we have seen superb examples in the past four days — for the sake of two less expensive products, both from France, both brut rosés.
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Maison Jaffelin dates back to 1816 and is one of the few estates that still makes wine in the ancient city of Beaune, the heart and nerve-center of Burgundy. The estate’s facility occupies a 12th Century edifice and cremant_de_bourgogne_brut_rosecellars, where they utilize the traditional vertical press and oval wooden vats. We look today not at the company’s red and white still wines from various villages and vineyards but at a delightful sparkling wine, the Jaffelin Brut Rosé nv, Crémant de Bourgogne, composed of chardonnay grapes, gamay and pinot noir and allowed to rest a minimum of 12 months on the lees in the bottle; yes, Crémant de Bourgogne is made in the methode traditionelle. The entrancing color is a pale salmon-copper hue with a faint gold overlay; the essential bubbles are finely-beaded, delicate yet exuberant. You get a lot of elegance and even a bit of hauteur from this acid-steel-and-flint-propelled sparkler, though it allows for a whisper of orange rind, a wisp of sour cherry and a snippet of melon; deep inside, it offers a bare hint of candied quince and kumquat, a vivid touch in this super clean, crisp and mineral-inflected effort. 12.5 percent alcohol. (A local purchase.) Very Good+. The average price nationally is about $18.

A Steven Bernardi Selection for Martinicus Wine, Beverly Hills, Fla.
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The date 1531 that you see at the bottom of the accompanying label does not refer to the vintage — “How fresh and bubbly after 484 years!” — but to the year in which, supposedly, the inhabitants of the town of Limoux discovered that a natural second bubble-inducing fermentation would occur in their white wines during the cool Spring. Limoux is an appellation directly west of Corbières in the Languedoc-Roussillon region, in extreme cote massouthwestern France, hard by the foothills of the Pyrenees. In other words, what came to be known as Blanquette de Limoux was a sparkling wine before the legendary Dom Perignon noticed the same sort of occurrence in Champagne. So, “Hahaha, you snobs in Champagne, we were there first!” is the motto of Limoux. Blanquette is traditionally made from the indigenous mauzac grape, but a far more recent appellation, Crémant de Limoux, is comprised of a total of at least 90 percent chenin blanc and chardonnay, with the addition of pinot noir or the old stand-by mauzac. Let’s, then, look at the Cote Mas Brut nv, Crémant de Limoux, produced by the firm of Jean-Claude Mas. It’s a blend of 70 percent chardonnay, 20 percent chenin blanc and 10 percent pinot noir, which in terms of this sparkler’s character seems just about perfect. Looking for a sparkling wine that’s the epitome of delight? This is it. The color is smoky light salmon-topaz, gracefully animated by a stream of tiny bubbles. Notes of rose petals and orange rind are augmented by hints of peach and spiced pear, with a snap of ginger and touches of pink bubblegum and chenin blanc’s heather and hay nature. The wine is dry yet juicy and appealing, and it captures a tone of damp limestone and flint for structure. 12 percent alcohol. Charming and whimsical. Very Good+. About $16, an Attractive Value.

Imported by Esprit du Vin, Boca Raton, Fla. A sample for review.
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Maison Jaffelin dates back to 1816 and is one of the few estates that still makes wine in the ancient city of Beaune, the heart and blanc de blancsnerve-center of Burgundy. The estate’s facility occupies a 12th Century edifice and cellars, where they utilize the traditional vertical press and oval wooden vats. We look today not at the company’s red and white still wines from various villages and vineyards but at a delightful sparkling wine, the Jaffelin Blanc de Blancs Brut, Crémant de Bourgogne, made from 100 percent chardonnay grapes. The color is pale gold, shimmering with an intense stream of tiny, foaming bubbles; the bouquet is very lemony and steely but offers notes of verbena, lemon balm and spiced pear and nicely manages to be slightly saline and a bit creamy together. In the mouth, this sparkling wine is framed by vigorous acidity and rigorous limestone minerality, resulting in a high-toned and fairly austere effect from mid-palate back through the finish. At the same time, it’s exhilarating and tasty with hints of citrus and stone-fruit flavors. 12.5 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $25, a local purchase.

A Steven Berardi Selection for Martinicus Wines, Beverly Hills, Fla.

Wine from Burgundy really increased in price over the last decade, or certainly during the brief course of the 21st Century, which has ecard_bourgogne_blanc_chardonnay_hq_labelturned out not to be one of the great centuries so far, so I am happy to offer My Readers a tasty and well-made Bourgogne Blanc at an amazingly reasonable price. No, the Maurice Ecard Bourgogne Chardonnay 2013 does not originate in a vineyard with a well-known name inside a prestigious appellation, it’s not a Premier Cru or Grand Cru wine. It is, on the other hand, very attractive and appealing in its amalgam of white flowers and yellow fruit, its crisp and lively nature aligned with a lovely talc-like yet lithe texture, its burgeoning limestone minerality, a feeling of damp stones and schist that persists through the crystalline finish. A few minutes in the glass bring up hints of quince and ginger and a note of pink grapefruit. The wine spent six months in oak barrels, a device that lent touches of spice and a supple structure. 13 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2016. You could sell the hell out of this wine in restaurant and bar by-the-glass programs. Very Good+. About $20.

Imported by Kysela Pere et Fils, Winchester, Va. Tasted as a local distributor’s trade event.

It’s not merely a matter of custom but a case of government regulation that the vineyards of Burgundy are officially measured, assessed and codified. The French love to be orderly and rational about these things, though one could argue that when it comes to classifying tiny vineyards no more distant from each other than the width of a country lane or ancient stone wall rationality has little to do with it. Still, the division of vineyards into the status of Village, Premier Cru and Grand Cru and the retention of that code form the basis upon which Burgundy works its magic and cements its reputation as the origin of some of the finest chardonnay and pinot noir wines in the world. This scheme, based on the supposition of the quality of the vineyards, that is, the terroir, and the wines they produce, holds true from Marsannay at the northern end of the Côte de Nuits to Saint-Véran at the southern tip of the Maconnais. I’m sorry that the Wine of the Day, No. 52, isn’t one of those fine chardonnays or pinot noirs from the Côte de Noir or Côte de Beaune — not that I wouldn’t mind tasting a few of those, please, sir — but My Readers won’t be too sorry, since those rare wines cost many hundreds of dollars. Instead, I offer a classy, beguiling and reasonably priced chardonnay from the Mâconnais, the Albert Bichot Viré-Clessé 2013. The region was awarded its own AOC in 1999, consisting of the communes of Clessé, Laizé, Montbellet and Viré in the sprawling and irregularly shaped AOC of Mâcon-Villages. Chardonnay is the only grape permitted. The Albert Bichot Viré-Clessé 2013 was fermented 80 percent in stainless steel and 20 percent in oak barriques and then aged — depending on the demands or blessings of the vintage — 12 to 15 months in the same vessels. The color is shimmering pale gold with a faint flush of green; aromas of lightly spiced green apple, pineapple and grapefruit are infused with a sense of limestone and flint minerality and notes of jasmine and honeysuckle. The wine passes lightly and deftly over the palate, but leaves an impression of pleasing fullness and an almost talc-like texture; bright acidity, however, keeps it spanking fresh and crisp. Citrus flavors take on shadings of pear and peach, all set within the context of chiseled and scintillating limestone elements where oak places a fleeting footprint. Alcohol content is 13 percent. Now through 2017 or ’18 with appetizers and main courses centered on fish and seafood, particularly grilled trout with brown butter and capers, seared salmon or swordfish with a mildly spicy rub; ideal for picnic-and-patio drinking; nothing too rich or heavy, mirroring the delicacy and directness of the wine. You’re not looking for anything profound here, and none such will you find; the motivation is delight and deliciousness. Very Good+. About $19, a local purchase.

European Wine Imports, Cleveland, Ohio.

Rully is one of the villages of the Côte Chalonnaise entitled to its own appellation. Named for the town of Chalon-sur-Saône, the region is part of greater Burgundy, lying between the southern tail of Burgundy’s Côte de Beaune and Mâconnais. As with its more important cousin to the north, the grapes in the Chalonnaise are chardonnay and pinot noir, except for the commune of Bouzeron, dedicated solely to the aligoté grape. Surprisingly, for its relatively minor status, 23 climats or vineyards in Rully are entitled to Premier Cru designation. The commune contains about 357 hectares of vines — 882 acres — of which 2/3 are devoted to chardonnay. Our Wine of the Day, No. 39, is the Rully Les Cloux Premier Cru 2012, from the distinguished firm of Olivier Leflaive. This estate owns vines in a magnificent roster of Côte de Beaune powerhouses, including Grand Cru and Premier Cru settings in Meursault, Montrachet, Puligny-Montrachet and Chassagne-Montrachet, as well as interests in Chablis and the Chalonnaise. As we would expect from Olivier Leflaive, the wine is treated carefully, aging six to seven months in oak barrels, never more than 15 percent new and then resting in stainless steel tanks for nine months, resulting in a wine of great freshness and direct appeal. The color is very pale gold; aromas of lime peel, orange blossom and slightly candied grapefruit are twined with a distinct loamy-briery character that segues seamlessly to the palate, where the wine exhibits a lovely, almost talc-like texture and bright acidity that lends liveliness and tautness. A few minutes in the glass bring in a tide of scintillating limestone minerality as well as a freshening swell of slightly exotic spice and floral elements. The importer’s website indicates that this 2012 is the vintage currently in the U.S. market, and while the wines of the region are not intended for laying down, this should certainly retain its attractive nature through 2016 and into 2017. Alcohol content is 13 percent. A chardonnay of terrific presence and integrity. Excellent. About $26, a local purchase that’s a bit below the national average price.

Imported by Frederick Wildman & Sons, New York.

I taste — not drink — a great deal of chardonnay wines made in California. Much of them are well-made and serve as exemplars of the grape, but far too many reveal signs of being over-manipulated in the winery with barrel-fermentation, malolactic, lees stirring and long aging in barrel. The result is often chardonnays that I find undrinkable because of their cloying viscosity and dessert-like character, their aggressive spiciness, their flamboyant richness and over-ripeness and basic lack of balance. This is why, when LL and I sit down to a dinner that requires a white wine, I generally open a sauvignon blanc or riesling, a Rhone-inspired white, a pinot blanc or an albariño. Looking for respite from tasting California chardonnays, I purchased a bottle of the Domaine Perraud Vieilles Vignes Mâcon-Villages 2013 from a local retail store. This is made completely from chardonnay grapes from 45-year-old vines; it sees no oak, and it’s a shimmering graceful beauty. Mâconnais lies south of Burgundy proper, between Chalonnais and Beaujolais and considerably smaller than either. The soil tends to be limestone and chalk and is best on the south-facing hillsides about 800 or so feet elevation. This wine spends eight to 12 months in stainless steel tanks, resting on the fine lees of dead yeast cells and skin fragments. The color is very pale gold; beguiling aromas of roasted lemon and lemon balm, lime peel, jasmine and verbena are highlighted by bright notes of quince and ginger; a lovely, almost talc-like texture is riven by a blade of clean acidity and bolstered by layers of chiseled limestone minerality, all at the service of delicious citrus and stone fruit flavors tempered by a concluding fillip of bracing grapefruit vigor. Utterly fresh, beautifully poised between elegance and delicacy, on the one hand, and presence and gravity on the other. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2017 or ’18. We had this last night with a dinner of broiled catfish with boiled potatoes and salsa verde, green beans on the side. What’s the lesson here? Chardonnay does not have to be bold, brassy, brash and buxom. Excellent. About $20, a Great Value.

Imported by North Berkeley Wine, Berkeley, Calif.

Clotilde Davenne launched her Domaine Les Temps Perdu in 2005, owning 8.5 hectares — about 22 acres — between Chablis and Saint Bris, to the southwest of Chablis. At the beginning, she still worked as winemaker for the Chablis house of Jean-Marc Brocard. Davenne produces a wide range of wines: Sauvignon blanc from Saint Bris, the only area in Chablis where sauvignon blanc is allowed; Bourgogne Aligoté and Bourgogne Blanc; Chablis and Petit Chablis; red and white Bourgogne Côtes d’Auxerre; from purchased grapes Chablis Premier Cru Montmains and Chablis Grand Cru Vaudésir, Les Clos and Preuses; and, for our purpose, Crémant de Bourgogne. All vinification occurs in stainless steel or enamel-lined tanks; no oak is used at this domain that is operated on organic principles.

Some of My Readers are thinking, “Wait a minute. If she’s in Chablis, how come she’s making Bourgogne?” Ah, you see, when the AOC regulations were promulgated in 1938, Chablis was made part of Burgundy, even though the distance between the city of Beaune, the heart of Burgundy, and the village of Chablis, the soul of its eponymous region, is 73 miles. The connection is the Kimmeridgian limestone that supports both areas and has such an affinity with chardonnay and pinot noir grapes; it’s true that Chablis is known for its white wines made from chardonnay, but pinot noir is very much present in the outlying vineyards.

Anyway, our sparkling wine for the Fifth Day of Christmas is the Clotilde Davenne Brut Extra Rosé Crémant de Bourgogne, made in the champagne method from pinot noir grapes. The color is a lovely pale salmon-copper hue, and the bubbles churn purposefully in an upward swirl. Brash aromas of fresh strawberries and raspberries carry tinges of cloves, lavender and dried red currants, all backed by a scintillating stony-minerally scent. This is fresh, crisp and animated, not only dense on the palate but almost chewy in texture, with remarkably lively presence and tone; in the mouth, it’s all riveting acidity and lip-smacking limestone minerality, though the finish is gently spicy and flavorful. 12.5 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $32, an online purchase, though prices around the country go as low as $25.

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