Sometimes a sweet wine is called for, and that’s just the way it is. For example, yesterday for lunch I had a pasta dish — the pasta was farfalle — that features caramelized cabbage with anchovy-sage-garlic bread crumbs. Plenty savory, all right, but the caramelized cabbage gave the dish a depth of sweetness that suggested drinking a sweet riesling with it. I opened the Brooks Wines “Sweet P” Riesling 2016, from Willamette Valley’s Eola-Amity Hills AVA. The grapes grow in a dry-farmed, biodynamic method vineyard on 42-year-old vines; native yeast starts the fermentation, and only stainless steel tanks are used, no oak. How sweet is the wine? The back label indicates a point between medium dry and medium sweet, and I would say that’s an accurate assessment. The color is pale straw-gold; at first the wine is all fresh green apple and apple skin; a few minutes in the glass bring in notes of spiced pear and lychee and a hint of apricot, unfolding elusive hints of jasmine and honeysuckle. On the palate, the sweetness assumes the form of ripe and slightly honeyed peaches and apricots balanced by bright acidity and a fairly glittering element of limestone minerality; the latter qualities provide a tension between softness and crispness, between sweet and dry that gives the wine excitement and allure. 11.9 percent alcohol. Production was 500 cases. Drink now through 2019 or ’20. Excellent. About $24.

A sample for review.