I don’t think you’ll find a better gewürztraminer at the price, so look for this model diligently — that is, if you like the grape variety. Not everyone does, because it can be assertively floral and spicy, but I’ve been a fan for 30 years and more; the Castel Sallegg Gewürztraminer 2015, Südtirol/Alto Adige, would be a good place to start if you’re not familiar with the grape. The wine hails from that part of the old Austro-Hungarian empire where borders between countries may be marked by road signs and lines on maps, but the ties of language, culture, families and agricultural practices are more important on the local level. In fact, many wines from this area of northeastern Italy bear labels with indications in Italian and German, and the appellation is listed, as you see, as both Südtirol and Alto Adige. The Castel Sallegg Gewürztraminer 2015, made all in stainless steel, offers a riveting nose of an unabashed floral nature, through it’s never cloying or overwhelming. Notes of jasmine, rose petal and lilac are wreathed with hints of lime peel, lemongrass, damp flint and heather in a heady, seductive amalgam. Also unabashed is the vital stream of bright acidity that lends the wine terrific appeal and drinkability, though the texture is not only crisp and lively but almost soothingly talc-like, both elements poised in exciting balance; subtle flavors of spicy, baked stone fruit (with a slightly exotic touch of lychee) continue through a finish that’s sleek with chiseled limestone minerality. 14 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2019 or ’20 with roasted pork shoulder or charcuterie, with seafood stews or risottos. A remarkably pure and intense gewürztraminer for the price. Excellent. About $16.

Weygandt-Metzler Importing, Rhinecliff, N.Y. A sample for review.