“Orange wine” became a category, a trend, an obsession in certain small circles 10 or 15 years ago. The concept of troonfermenting white grapes on the skins — hence the pale orange color — runs contrary to the usual practice, in which the juice and skins are whisked away from each other, so the wine takes on the familiar hues of pale or medium straw or gold. Fermenting white grapes on the skins, about which a great deal of ink was spilled or keyboards mangled for a fervent period of time, seems to have lost its controversial and partisan allure, so winemakers can decide to make an orange wine without subscribing to a list of demands or pledging allegiance to a philosophy laid down by fanatical critics. For those consumers who have never tried an orange wine, I offer today the Troon Vineyard Whole Grape Ferment Riesling 2016, from Oregon’s Applegate Valley appellation. Foot-trod, fermented with native yeasts, the wine — Troon’s first venture into orangeness — spent a bare three months in neutral French oak barrels. It’s unlike any riesling you ever encountered. The color is a kind of pale copper-topaz hue; at first, the wine is pure apples and in fact smells rather like cider; then it expands with notes of orange rind and spiced pear and a sherry-like tendency toward cloves and roasted/salted almonds. The wine is quite dry, animated by brisk acidity, and organized around a structure that while delicate and lithe feels almost tannic. From mid-palate back through the finish, it’s dominated by elements of quince marmalade infused with ginger, candied grapefruit rind and a touch of green olive. 12 percent alcohol. Not intended to make old bones, this unique wine should be consumed by the end of 2017. Winemaker was Steve Hall. Try with tapas and other salty and savory appetizers. Excellent. About $20, representing Good Value.

A sample for review.