If it is authenticity you’re looking for, if it is an attachment to the land and simplicity that hoist your flag, then you need to purchase tire-pea case of the Chateau Tire Pé “Diem” 2012, from a property that occupies a hillside in the south of Entre-Deux-Mers, overlooking the Gironde River. The wine carries a Bordeaux designation. The estate is owned by David and Hélène Barrault, who bought the chateau, built in the 1750s, in 1997, knowing not a whit about vineyards, grape-growing or winemaking. They skated that learning curve with ease, now turning out some 3,500 to 4,200 cases of certified organic red wine annually. One wing of the chateau, really a farmhouse, has been converted into a model of the most charming, modest bed-and-breakfast establishments you can imagine. I stayed one night there in October 2011 and would go back in a flash.

Today’s wine, the Chateau Tire Pé “Diem” 2012 is made from 100 percent merlot grapes that touch no oak at all; the wine ages eight to 10 diemmonths in concrete tanks and is bottled unfiltered. The color is dark ruby with a softer magenta rim; it’s a robust country wine, bursting with ripe black currants, mulberries and blueberries etched with briery, foresty elements bolstered on the palate by dusty, graphite-drenched tannins and lip-smacking acidity, gradually opening to floral qualities and dried fruit and spices and notes of some cedary, dried herbs nature. So, you’re saying, is that all there is to it? No, friends, because within that laconic description lies an unadorned wine of tremendous vibrancy, resonance and intensity, a wine that feels alive in the glass and the embodiment of the rows of vines and soil that gave it birth. So, there’s that. 13 percent alcohol. Drink through 2018 with hearty winter fare. Excellent. About — are you ready — $12 a bottle, marking Terrific Value.

Jenny & François Selections, New York. A sample for review.