Here’s a refreshing way to end the week or start it, depending on your point of view of Sunday’s boscofunction. The Bosco di Gica Brut, Valdobbiandene Prosecco Superiore, from the almost century-old Adriano Adami estate, adds some three to five percent chardonnay to its regulation glera grape, the one we used to call the prosecco grape but no longer. (How often in the dim past did I write “Prosecco is the name of the grape and the product”?) The grapes were grown on steep terraced hillsides of fairly shallow soil, the vineyards generally facing south; this is north of Venice. Prosecco is made, of course, not in the “Champagne method” of second fermentation in the bottle but in the Charmat process in which the second fermentation that produces the bubbles, occurs in steel pressure tanks. Whatever the method, the Bosco di Gica Brut is indeed a superior Prosecco, offering a very pale gold hue and a steady stream of glinting bubbles that’s more a persistent fizz than a propulsive froth; still, it’s quite pretty. Aromas of apples and pears, acacia and almond blossom develop hints of lime peel and almond skin; on the palate, this sparkler is delicate, pert and lively, a tickle for the tongue, made intriguing by its briny seashell minerality and pleasing for its deft balance and integration. 11 percent alcohol. Drink up and enjoy. Excellent. About $18.

Imported by Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif. A sample for review.