Bill Mosby is probably weary, weary of people describing his winery as “a little bit of Italy in Santa Ynez Valley,” but that’s the price you pay for adhering to a strict regimen of Italian grape varieties along California’s Central Coast. Today I write about four of his wines, from a roster of 17, as well as grappa, plum brandy and other distillates, all of which he produces in minute quantities. Mosby and his wife Jeri purchased property on the old Rancho de la Vega land grant in 1976, on the Santa Rosa Road south of Buellton — population 4,828 and home of OstrichLand USA — now somewhat a center of the winemaking industry in the valley. The winery features an adobe house built in 1853, the home of the Mosby family, and a carriage house from the 1880s, the winery’s tasting room.

We have to approach the problem of what wines should be like when they’re associated with a geography and climate far away, as in thousands of miles and different longitudes and latitudes. Santa Barbara County doesn’t much resemble, for example, Italy’s chilly mountainous Alto Adige or the hilly Piedmont, but here we are, with the Mosby family, growing gewurztraminer and dolcetto. Do we judge these wines on how closely they align with a sort of ideal version of those grapes grown in their homeland or on how “good” they are, relatively speaking, considering their Central Coast origin? We have to account for these immense variations yet also consider varietal character and integrity. I blow warm and cool of these four examples from Mosby Wines, which in several cases are quite enjoyable but don’t much conjure their regions in Italy. Still, what do we expect? The one I would go back to is the Dolcetto 2012. By the way, I admire Mosby for employing large oak barrels and a minimum of new oak in making these wines. The attractive labels were designed by Robert Scherer.

These wines were samples for review.
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traminer2010
Mosby Traminer 2014, Santa Barbara County, made completely in stainless steel. The color is pale straw-gold; the bouquet is intensely floral, with notes of jasmine, honeysuckle and camellia highlighting aromas of lemon and pear, quince and ginger. The wine is clean, bright and lively, with soft peach flavors and a snap of grapefruit bitterness on the finish. The wine is very dry
and quite earthy, more loamy, in fact, than is good for a great impression. Still, an enjoyable version of the gewurztraminer grape. 13.6 percent alcohol. Production was 158 cases. Drink up. Very Good+. About $18.
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sagrantino
The sagrantino grape is indigenous to the region surrounding the incredibly quaint hill-town of Montefalco, in eastern Umbria, where it makes powerful, tannic wines with guts and grit. The Mosby Sagrantino 2011, Santa Barbara County, doesn’t measure up in that sense, though it’s pleasant enough in its way. The wine aged in large French oak barrels, 20 percent new. The color is dark ruby with a garnet rim; enticing aromas of ripe black cherries and raspberries are tinged with violets and lavender and a hint of graphite, while elements of briers, brambles and underbrush gradually emerge. What the wine lacks is sagrantino’s tannic pith and vigor. 14.8 percent alcohol. Production was 309 cases. Drink now through 2018 to 2020. Very Good. About $38.
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dolcetto
The Mosby Dolcetto 2012, Santa Barbara County, is a lovely expression of the grape’s character. It aged in large French oak barrels, 20 percent new. It offers a dark ruby-purple hue with a magenta rim and a full-blown bouquet of ripe black currants, raspberries and plums permeated by notes of loam, forest floor, violets and oolong tea. These qualities segue seamlessly to the palate, where the wine is dense, intense and velvety and delivers very ripe, sweet black fruit flavors marked by sufficient tannin for structure and acidity for balance. 13.5 percent alcohol. Production was 302 cases. Drink through 2017 to ’19. Very Good+. About $28.
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seduzione
Lagrein is one of those grape that is fairly specific to a country or region, like poulsard in the Jura or zweigelt in Austria. Lagrein is native to Italy’s Trentino-Alto Adige area, in the mountainous northeast. The Mosby La Seduzione Lagrein 2011, Central Coast, is not as seductive as its makers would like it to be, being deep, dark, inky, tarry, dense and concentrated, with intense scents and flavors of black currants, cherries and plums, dusty and velvety tannins, notes of smoke, tobacco and cedar, and not quite enough acidity to shore up all these elements. If this personality sounds enticing to you, go for it. Again, the regimen is large French oak barrels, 20 percent new. Production was 206 cases. Now through 2020 or ’21. Very Good. About $38.
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