December 2015


While the trend today is for what’s called “grower Champagne” or sometimes “artisanal” or “farmhouse” Champagne, with implications of a hands-on family approach from vineyard through final disgorgement, don’t forget that the grande marques, the Big Houses, so to speak, which obtain most of their grapes on long-term contract, can still clicquot roseprovide sublime drinking experiences. The Veuve Clicquot Brut Rosé 2004 — an online purchase — may not convey the sense of individuality, intimacy and terroir beloved by foodies, hipsters and others of the obsessive ilk, but damn, it’s a honey of a Champagne that displays gratifying depth and breadth of character and a heap of pleasure. A blend of 62 percent pinot noir, 15 percent chardonnay, 8 percent pinot meunier and 15 percent “red wine,” the Veuve Clicquot Brut Rosé 2004 offers a beguiling robe of smoky topaz flushed with a blaze of light copper and a foaming upward-swirling procession of tiny glinting bubbles; you could stare at this panoply for hours. First come notes of fresh strawberries and raspberries, imbued with hints of orange rind, quince and ginger and touches of dried currants, almond skin and — very quietly — orange blossom. There’s some element of fresh biscuits and lightly-buttered cinnamon toast, but the dominant theme on the palate is played by steel and limestone; the texture is sleek, lithe and lively, with moderate and transparent density. The result is a graceful and elegant brut rosé that reveals innate power and energy. The bottle I bought was disgorged in May 2013, so the Champagne rested on the lees in bottle for about eight years. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drink through 2018 to ’22. Excellent. Look for national prices ranging, realistically, from $90 to $100, though a handful of retail outlets have this product drastically reduced, I mean as low as $65.

Imported by Moet Hennessy USA, New York. Only one product today instead of the usual two. I’ll get caught up soon.
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Well, actually, in this post I’m going to omit Champagne — of which we have seen superb examples in the past four days — for the sake of two less expensive products, both from France, both brut rosés.
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Maison Jaffelin dates back to 1816 and is one of the few estates that still makes wine in the ancient city of Beaune, the heart and nerve-center of Burgundy. The estate’s facility occupies a 12th Century edifice and cremant_de_bourgogne_brut_rosecellars, where they utilize the traditional vertical press and oval wooden vats. We look today not at the company’s red and white still wines from various villages and vineyards but at a delightful sparkling wine, the Jaffelin Brut Rosé nv, Crémant de Bourgogne, composed of chardonnay grapes, gamay and pinot noir and allowed to rest a minimum of 12 months on the lees in the bottle; yes, Crémant de Bourgogne is made in the methode traditionelle. The entrancing color is a pale salmon-copper hue with a faint gold overlay; the essential bubbles are finely-beaded, delicate yet exuberant. You get a lot of elegance and even a bit of hauteur from this acid-steel-and-flint-propelled sparkler, though it allows for a whisper of orange rind, a wisp of sour cherry and a snippet of melon; deep inside, it offers a bare hint of candied quince and kumquat, a vivid touch in this super clean, crisp and mineral-inflected effort. 12.5 percent alcohol. (A local purchase.) Very Good+. The average price nationally is about $18.

A Steven Bernardi Selection for Martinicus Wine, Beverly Hills, Fla.
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The date 1531 that you see at the bottom of the accompanying label does not refer to the vintage — “How fresh and bubbly after 484 years!” — but to the year in which, supposedly, the inhabitants of the town of Limoux discovered that a natural second bubble-inducing fermentation would occur in their white wines during the cool Spring. Limoux is an appellation directly west of Corbières in the Languedoc-Roussillon region, in extreme cote massouthwestern France, hard by the foothills of the Pyrenees. In other words, what came to be known as Blanquette de Limoux was a sparkling wine before the legendary Dom Perignon noticed the same sort of occurrence in Champagne. So, “Hahaha, you snobs in Champagne, we were there first!” is the motto of Limoux. Blanquette is traditionally made from the indigenous mauzac grape, but a far more recent appellation, Crémant de Limoux, is comprised of a total of at least 90 percent chenin blanc and chardonnay, with the addition of pinot noir or the old stand-by mauzac. Let’s, then, look at the Cote Mas Brut nv, Crémant de Limoux, produced by the firm of Jean-Claude Mas. It’s a blend of 70 percent chardonnay, 20 percent chenin blanc and 10 percent pinot noir, which in terms of this sparkler’s character seems just about perfect. Looking for a sparkling wine that’s the epitome of delight? This is it. The color is smoky light salmon-topaz, gracefully animated by a stream of tiny bubbles. Notes of rose petals and orange rind are augmented by hints of peach and spiced pear, with a snap of ginger and touches of pink bubblegum and chenin blanc’s heather and hay nature. The wine is dry yet juicy and appealing, and it captures a tone of damp limestone and flint for structure. 12 percent alcohol. Charming and whimsical. Very Good+. About $16, an Attractive Value.

Imported by Esprit du Vin, Boca Raton, Fla. A sample for review.
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The principle of this series, now in its ninth Yuletide season, is that a specific product can never be repeated, but I can write about different offerings from the same Champagne house or estate in Alsace or winery in California or whatever. You get the idea, I’m sure. Today, for example, we discuss the Laurent-Perrier Brut Millésimé 2006; I have included other releases from Laurent-Perrier in this series, but never one bearing a laurent 2006vintage date. High time, I say!

What would become the house of Laurent-Perrier was founded in 1812 by André Michel Pierlot, a former cooper and bottler turned negociant. His son, Alphonse Pierlot, succeeded him and, having no heirs, eventually bequeathed the estate to his cellar master, Eugène Laurent. When the latter died in an accident in 1887, his widow, Mathilde Emilie Perrier, took the reins of the house and renamed it Veuve Laurent-Perrier. A woman of formidable character, she ran the estate until her death in 1925, when her daughter, Eugénie-Hortense Laurent, succeeded her. Hard-hit by the economic crisis between the Wars and heavily in debt, Eugénie-Hortense sold the estate to Marie-Louise de Nonancourt in 1939.

At the conclusion of World War II, Bernard de Nonancourt returned to his home and underwent an apprenticeship to teach him every aspect of the making and business of Champagne. In October 1948, aged 28, he was appointed chairman and chief executive of Laurent-Perrier. Bernard de Nonancourt died in 2010, and the house is now operated by his daughters, Alexandra Pereyre de Nonancourt and Stéphanie Meneux de Nonancourt. Cellar master of Laurent-Perrier is Michel Fauconnet, who started with the company in 1974 and took his current post in 2004. This narrative seems to be a homage to loyalty, patience, longevity and imagination.

The Laurent-Perrier Brut Millésimé 2006 is a half-and-half blend of chardonnay and pinot noir, all grapes coming from Grand Cru villages. It spent eight years in the bottle, resting on the lees. The color is a very pale golden hue energized by a shimmer of tiny gleaming bubbles so prolific and mesmerizing that it’s almost erotic. This vintage Champagne opens with notes of acacia and heather, expanding to touches of spiced pear, quince and ginger and toasted hazelnuts, all wrapped in a lightly toasty biscuity aspect over a foundation of chalk and limestone. It’s close to viscous in texture, with hints of juicy citrus and stone-fruit flavors subdued by a tremendous limestone and flint structure and the nervous vivacity of bright, crisp acidity. The finish leans toward glacial austerity and chilly hauteur; tis a brave person that will broach this fine-boned elegance, but the gratification will be worth the effort. 12 percent alcohol. Consume through 2018 to ’20, properly stored. Excellent. About $65.

Imported by Laurent-Perrier US Inc., Sausalito, Calif. A sample for review.
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Let’s stay in France for today’s methode traditionelle offering, in this case, the François Baur Brut Réserve a baurnon-vintage, or actually multi-vintage, Cremant d’Alsace. The Baur family was established in the village of Turckheim in 1741; the estate is now operated by the ninth generation. Since 2001, the vineyards have been managed on biodynamic principles. According to French wine regulations, Cremant d’Alsace must be made by the Champagne method of second fermentation in the bottle. The François Baur Brut Réserve — a blend of pinot blanc, riesling, chardonnay and pinot gris — is a lively and engaging sparkling wine that offers a pale gold color and a pleasing fountain of tiny bubbles; there’s a spectrum of lemon effects, in the range of roasted lemon, lemon balm and lemon curd, with a few moments in the glass bringing out hints of jasmine, fresh bread, quince jam and spiced pear, all honed on an edge of steel and limestone. The wine is crisp and tart, quite dry with burgeoning minerality and sleek acidity, but tasty, very well-balanced, lithe and smoky. 12.5 percent alcohol. Heaps of personality with a serious mien. Excellent. About $18, a Lovely Value.

Frederick Wildman & Sons, New York. A sample for review.
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The house of Diebolt-Vallois is fairly young for Champagne. Though the Vallois family had been raising vines in the village of Cuis since the 15th Century — think of the heritage that implies! — and the Diebolt family had dieboltbeen living in the village of Cramant since the end of the 19th century, it was only in 1978 that Jacques Diebolt and Nadia Vallois launched the estate that bears their combined names. Their children, Arnaud and Isabelle, work with the parents and take an increasingly active role in running the estate. The product under consideration today (an online purchase) is the non-vintage Diebolt-Vallois Prestige Brut, actually a blanc de blancs, being composed of 100 percent chardonnay grapes. Not mentioned on the label is the fact that all the grapes derive from Grand Cru-ranked villages in Champagne’s Cote des Blancs region. Gosh, this is a beautifully wrought Champagne. The color is ultra pale gold, like platinum blond, set aglow within by the constant shimmer of tiny frothing bubbles. It’s a chiseled Champagne of elegant cheekbones and slim wrists, yet possessing the strength to carry a load of limestone and chalk from first sniff to final sip; you feel the strata of minerals below the vineyards with each encounter. Bare hints of roasted lemon, apple skin, spiced pear and lime peel flesh out its character and appeal, lending beguiling fragrance and lingering but elusive taste. It’s perfectly balanced on the palate, its dense, talc-like mineral nature riven by pinpoint crystalline acidity. I could drink this all day and night, and sort of did. 12.5 percent alcohol. Excellent. Look for prices nationally from $50 to $70.

Petit Pois Corp T/A Sussex Wine Merchants, Moorestown, N.J.
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Here’s an interesting entry for this series, a first sparkling wine from New Zealand. Kim Crawford founded his fizzeponymous winery in 1996 and sold it to Canadian beverage giant Vincor in 2003. That concern in turn was acquired by Constellation Brands in 2006. Today we look at the Kim Crawford Small Parcels Methode Traditionelle Fizz 2009, Marlborough, a blend of 60 percent pinot noir and 40 percent chardonnay. (Winemaker was Anthony Walkenhorst.) This is a delightful sparkling wine, clean, fresh and bright. The color is pale gold, and the tiny bubbles stream upward in a generous swirl. Notes of toasted cinnamon bread and brioche are buoys to hints of roasted lemon, spiced pear and a touch of slightly caramelized tropical fruit. The wine is quite dry and boasts an exquisite structure of oyster shell and limestone that increases its influence through a finish that’s poignant in its delicacy and transparency. Another sparkler with fine bones and interior power. 12 percent alcohol. Drink through 2017 to ’19. Very Good+. About $35.

Constellation Imports, Rutherford, Calif.
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duval lerot rose
The Champagne house mentioned yesterday in this space, Ayala, was founded in 1860. For today’s entry, we skip back one year to 1859, when the house of Duval-Leroy was established by the melding of two well-known families in Champagne. Duval-Leroy is still run by the family, with Carol Duval-Leroy at the head, assisted by her sons, Julien, Charles and Louis. Master of the cave is Sandrine Logette-Jardin. A major contribution of the house to the Champagne industry occurred in 1911, when Raymond Duval-Leroy created the first Champagne made exclusively from Premier Cru vineyards, opening the door to a level of focused, upscale products. Our Champagne today is the Duval-Leroy Premier Cru Rose Prestige, composed of 90 percent pinot noir and 10 percent chardonnay, aged on the lees a minimum of 36 months. The color is an entrancing smoky topaz-light copper hue, given liveliness by a upward surge of tiny bubbles. First, on the nose, come notes of strawberry, raspberry and orange rind, deepened, after a few moments, by hints of brioche and lightly-buttered cinnamon toast, quince and orange marmalade. Make no mistake, this is a high-toned, dry Champagne, flush with elements of limestone and flint, satin and steel, yet immensely appealing in its touches of red berries, cloves and a bracing fillip of sea-salt, all expressed with the utmost delicacy and tenderness over a tensile structure. 12 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $80.

Imported by Terlato Wines International, Lake Bluff, Ill. A sample for review.
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PRBR_Web
Here’s another brut rose, this one from Napa Valley. Priest Ranch is a label of the Somerston Wine Co. that includes Somerston Wines and Highflyer. Craig Becker is general manager and director of winemaking and viticulture. The Priest Ranch Brut Rose 2011, Napa Valley, was made from 100 percent pinot noir grapes. The wine was fermented in stainless steel tanks and neutral French oak barrels; produced in the traditional Champagne method, it spent 18 months in the bottle en tirage, on the lees. The color is medium salmon-topaz with a core of tempest-like tiny bubbles. Lots of steel and flint in evidence, a crisp and lively sparkling wine, it offers notes of blood orange, apple peel and lime with hints of almond skin and orange blossom; a few minutes in the glass nurture elements of sweet red fruit and juicy currants. An intense limestone edge and brisk acidity lead to an austere finish that builds layers of chalk and damp shale. 12.5 percent alcohol. A fresh, lovely, vibrant brut rose for drinking through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $38.

A sample for review.
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Yes, indeed, My Readers, today launches the ninth edition of “Twelve Days of Christmas with Champagne and Sparkling Wine,” and I’m changing the format a bit to accommodate different genres and styles of sparkling wine. Each day of the series, I will offer two examples, one a Champagne (I hope) and the second an alternate sort of sparkling wine, though one post will be devoted to Prosecco because it’s so popular, and producers are trying to make an up-scale shift. As usual, on New Year’s Eve, I’ll offer three or four products at various prices.

So, on we go, enjoy and Merry Christmas!
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ayala
The house of Ayala was founded in 1860 by Edmond de Ayala in the village of Aÿ, which looks like the name of an exotic seductress in a science-fiction movie. The estate was operated by the family until 2005, when it was acquired by Bollinger. The Ayala Brut Majeur, nv, is a blend of 40 percent chardonnay, 40 percent pinot noir and 20 percent pinot meunier. It rests on the lees — the residue of dead yeast cells — in the bottle for an average of eight years. The color is pale gold, set a-shimmer by a frothing surge of tiny glinting bubbles. A prominent architecture of damp limestone and chalk frames beguiling notes of roasted lemon, spiced pear and lightly candied quince and ginger, buoyed by a lithe and animated texture heightened by crisp acidity. From mid-palate back through the finish, the mineral element becomes more pronounced, though that influence only augments this Champagne’s essential crystalline purity and intensity. 12 percent alcohol. I loved this Champagne’s liveliness and elevation. (A local purchase.) Excellent. About $40.

Imported by Vintus LLC, Pleasantville, N.Y.
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bonny doon sparkling albarino
Rare is the occasion when I’m called upon to mention the albariño grape in the same line as sparkling wine, but leave it to Randall Grahm, the indefatigable leader of Bonny Doon Vineyard to explore such an option. Made in the Champagne method of second fermentation in the bottle — now called the “traditional method” outside of Champagne because of EU regulations — the Bonny Doon Sparkling Albariño 2010, Central Coast, offers a mild gold hue and moderate through very pretty effervescence. (This product is finished with a bottle cap, so be careful when you open it.) When first broached, this Sparkling Albariño seems delicate, a creature of soft wings and tender threads, but a few minutes in the glass bring out distinct elements of roasted lemon, baked pineapple and caramel apple, with a back-note of candied citron. It’s quite dry, slightly funky and earthy in a loamy way, and sports a finish that’s savory, bracing and saline. 12.5 percent alcohol. Production was 617 cases. If you have any of this on hand or find a bottle to purchase, by all means try it, but drink up; I think it has reached the distance of its range. Very Good+. About $36.

A sample for review.
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It’s immensely gratifying to taste a well-balanced wine that doesn’t allow one aspect of the grape or the wine-making to dominate the other qualities. The best or at least the most satisfying wine exists in a state of internal harmony that appeals to the eye, the nose and the palate in equal measure. Such wines come forward to you in a state of gradual revelation, not muted and unmarred by over-ripe jammy fruit, thunderous tannin, cinsaultstrident oak and high alcohol’s cloying heat. Unfortunately, the latter characteristics are often common in red wines that hail from the Lodi appellation, where producers of zinfandel, in particular, have a penchant for studly power above all other possibilities. Representing a saner approach for the AVA, however, is the Estate Crush Cinsault 2013, the grapes for which derived from the 129-year-old Bechthold Vineyard. Estate Crush was founded in 2009 by Bob Colarossi and Alison Liebich Colarossi. Located in downtown Lodi, the facility is a custom crush establishment, with tasting room, that makes wine for more than 80 clients, as well as its own releases. The Estate Crush Cinsault 2013 came to me unannounced via one of the major delivery services, and I’m certainly happy that it did. The color is an entrancing deep cherry-magenta hue; dark and spicy aromas of red cherries, mulberries and plums encompass a burgeoning intensity of lavender, violets and graphite under wild top-notes of cranberry and pomegranate. A briary-brambly quality lends earthiness on the palate, while vital acidity keeps the wine lithe and lively and drinkable. Just enough tannin and oak give the wine structure without interfering with the subtly tart and juicy red fruit flavors. 14.5 percent alcohol. Pretty damned ideal, I’d say. Excellent. About $26, and Worth a Search.

I know the name Ernie Els and that he is a well-known golfer — I wonder why we don’t say “golf player” — mainly
big easybecause he comes up in crossword puzzles, where there is an insatiable need for three-letter words. The South African Els is not the first star golfer to create a wine label; Australian Greg Norman came first, though to my knowledge his name never crops up in crossword puzzle clues. Els’ new label, “Big Easy,” refers not to the city of New Orleans, as one might suppose, but to Ernie Els himself, so nicknamed because of his carriage and the beauty of his effortless swing (I had to look that up). The golfer launched his wine enterprise in 1999. A portion of the profits from the Big Easy wines will benefit the foundation that Els and his wife started for research into autism. If you happen to be hankering for an, ahem, easy-drinking white wine, look to the Ernie Els Big Easy Chenin Blanc 2015, Western Cape, South Africa, 100 percent varietal and made all in stainless steel. The color is very pale gold; well-integrated aromas of hay, pear, quince and jasmine open to notes of heather, bay leaf and a refreshing aura of seashell minerality and brininess. That appealing aspect of sea-breeze freshness and salinity washes over the palate, bringing subtle touches of roasted lemon, peach and spiced pear; vivid acidity keeps the wine crisp and lively, while a bracing limestone element pierces the finish. 13.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through the Summer of 2016. Winemaker was Louis Strydom. Very Good+. About $17.

Imported by Terlato Wines International, Lake Bluff, Ill. A sample for review.

On November 15, I posted a series of reviews about 18 sauvignon blanc wines made in California (here). Today, it’s the turn of 15 sauvignon blancs from other parts of the world: France, New Zealand, Chile and Italy. There’s much to like here, especially if you’re fond of the French styles of the Loire Valley and Bordeaux, but there’s a big surprise from northeastern Italy at a bargain price too. As usual, in the Weekend Wine Notes, I eschew technical, historical and geographical data in favor of quick incisive mentions designed to pique the interest and whet the palate. Most of these wines were samples for review; a few were tasted at distributors’ trade events.

The absence of label illustrations in the New Zealand section below is because the websites associated with the several wineries or importers were either extremely user-unfriendly, inadequate or hopelessly out of date.
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France
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jolivet sancerre
Pascal Jolivet Sancerre 2014, Loire Valley. 12.5% alc. 100% sauvignon blanc. Very pale straw-gold hue; clean, fresh, crisp and appealing; notes of roasted lemon, lemon balm and tangerine; pulls up hints of lemongrass and slightly dusty dried herbs; lithe and supple, exquisitely balanced and energized; increasingly dry and heady with limestone minerality. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $24.
Frederick Wildman & Sons, New York.
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sancerre-blanc--caves-monmousseau
Domaine Justin Monmousseau Sancerre 2014, Loire Valley. 100% sauvignon blanc. Pale straw color; first the limestone and chalk, then a snap of gun-flint; roasted lemon and verbena, bay and thyme, with a citrus undertow; very dry, a little austere but seductive in its talc-like texture riven by scintillating acidity. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $24.
USA Wine Imports, New York
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EXEM Blanc
EXEM 2014, Bordeaux. 12% alc. 60% sauvignon blanc, 40% semillon. Very pale straw color; gooseberry, grapefruit and lime peel, notes of leafy fig, roasted lemon and currant; pert, tart and sassy; tasty citrus flavors with a hint of spiced pear; pleasing texture, part lush, part lithe. Now through 2016. Very Good+. About $13.
Winesellers Ltd., Niles, Ill.
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esprit bordeaux blanc
Esprit Saint-Sulpice 2014, Bordeaux Blanc. 12.5% alc. Sauvignon blanc 80%, semillon 20%. Pale gold hue; very clean, fresh and bright; green apple, lemons and orange blossom, just a hint of grass and dried herbs, and touches of lime peel and mango; lovely powdery texture but lively with crisp acidity; quite dry, finishes with a tide of damp limestone. Truly charming. Very Good+. About $17.
Fredric Wildman & Sons, New York.
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hauts de smith
Les Hauts de Smith 2011, Pessac-Leognan. 13% alc. Medium straw-gold hue; spiced pear, quince and ginger, whiffs of honeysuckle and acacia, fennel and lavender; quite dry but juicy with grapefruit and peach flavors hinting at a sunny leafy fig character and a bell-tone of black currant; layers of limestone and flint minerality lead to a fairly austere finish animated by brisk acidity; overall impression is of substance balanced by elegance and transparency. Now through 2020 to 2022. Excellent. About $45.
Joanne Bordeaux, Jersey City, N.J.
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tour
Chateau Tour Leognan 2013, Pessac-Leognan Blanc. 12.5% alc. 70% sauvignon blanc, 30% semillon. Fairly NZ-like for a Bordeaux blanc, with snappy pea-shoot, lime peel and grapefruit qualities, crisp and lively, featuring jazzed-up acidity and loads of limestone and flint; very fresh, charming and appealing, good balance and presence. Now through 2016 into 2017. Very Good+. About $22.
Monsieur Touton Selections, New York.
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chateau-villa-bel-air-graves-france-10213716
Chateau Villa Bel-Air 2013, Graves. 13% alc. 65% sauvignon blanc, 35% semillon. Very pale gold color; clean, crisp, delicate; honeysuckle, cloves and fennel, notes of grapefruit and candied orange rind, quince and ginger and a lingering after-glow of lychee and something faintly resiny; lovely shape and tone, set chiming with keen acidity and limestone minerality. Now through 2017 to ’18. Excellent. About $25.
Verity Wine Partners, New York
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New Zealand
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Mud House Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Marlborough. 13% alc. 100% sauvignon blanc. Very pale straw color; a winsome and layered bouquet of grapefruit, pea-shoot, tangerine and lime peel, with notes of new-mown grass, timothy and thyme, gooseberry and a tinge of currant; a top-note of jasmine; smooth segue into the mouth, very dry with an almost powdery texture shot with fleet acidity; cleansing limestone and chalk minerality. Totally charming. Now through 2017. Excellent. About $17.
Imported by Accolade Wines North America, Napa, Calif.
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Mt. Beautiful Sauvignon Blanc 2014, North Canterbury. 13% alc. 100% sauvignon blanc. Pale straw-yellow; lime peel and pea-shoot, notes of grapefruit, lychee and greengage; lively and ebullient but not flamboyant; lovely talc-like texture buoyed by bright acidity; very dry, lots of limestone and flint, a fairly austere finish. Now through 2017. Very Good+. About $16.
Mt. Beautiful USA, Bernecia, Calif.
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Nobilo Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Marlborough. 12.5% alc. Pale gold color; pea-shoot, pear, lime peel and grapefruit; celery seed and caraway; crisp and lively with taut acidity; permeated by elements of damp limestone and shale, especially from mid-palate through the finish; direct and appealing, with a lovely texture. Rink up. Very Good+. About $13.
Constellation Imports, Madera, Calif.
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Nobilo Icon Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Marlborough. 12% alc. 100% sauvignon blanc. Pale straw-gold; very clean, fresh, pure and vibrant; a distinctly meadowy sauvignon blanc, with notes of celery seed and caraway, grapefruit and lime peel, pea-shoot and fig; an attractively leafy, grassy and citrusy wine, quite dry and tart and finishing with grapefruit pith and limestone. Lots of character and personality. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $20.
Constellation Imports, Gonzales, Calif.
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Starborough Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Marlborough. 12.5% alc. 100% sauvignon blanc. A Gallo label. Very pale gold; defines what we think of as the Oz style in sauvignon blanc: lime peel, gooseberry, grapefruit, pea-shoot, kiwi and lychee; snappy, tart and pungent; shimmering limestone element. Drink up. Very Good. About $15.
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Italy
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Prodigo Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Friuli Grave. 12% alc. 100% sauvignon blanc. Pale straw-gold; restrained and prodigodelicate, yet intense and penetrating; blooming with jasmine and almond blossom; mint and heather, tarragon and pea shoot, roasted lemon and lime peel; utterly beguiling and seductive; keen acidity powering limestone and flint minerality. Now through 2017. Excellent. About $11, a Bargain of the Century.
Imported by Winesellers Ltd., Niles, Ill.
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Chile
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Concha y Toro Ribera del Rapel Gran Reserva Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Colchagua Valley. 13% alc. 100% sauvignon Gran_Reserva_Sauvignon_Blanc_Label_NV-300x259blanc. Pale straw hue; grapefruit, yellow plum, fennel and celery seed, notes of gooseberry, thyme and tarragon; taut, lithe and crisp, with tons of presence and tone; a full complement of limestone and flint minerality, energized by vibrant acidity; terrific balance and integration. Now through 2017. Excellent. About $17, representing Great Value.
Excelsior Wines, Old Brookville, N.Y.
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Concha y Toro Costa Terrunyo Los Boldos Vineyard Block 5 Sauvignon Blanc 2012, Casablanca Valley. 13% alc. 100% Terrunyo_Sauvignon_Blanc_Front_Label-300x218sauvignon blanc. Pale gold color; smoke and steel; celery seed, fennel, tarragon; grapefruit and lime peel; very dry, crisp and dynamic, with deep reserves of limestone and chalk; focuses on spiced pear and peach flavors, off-set by slightly astringent herbal elements; one of the best sauvignon blanc wines I have tasted from Chile. Now through 2017 or ’18. Excellent. About $26, and Worth It.
Excelsior Wines, Old Brookville, N.Y.
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The color of the Mud House Pinot Noir 2013, from New Zealand’s Marlborough region, is such a lovely, limpid, transparent ruby hue that mud houseyou could be forgiven for wanting just to gaze upon it for a while, as one might be mesmerized by a glass of red wine in a Dutch still-life painting. Take a sniff, though, to encounter the wine’s winsome notes of cloves and sassafras, red cherry and raspberry, slightly roughened by touches of briery-brambly elements. This pinot noir ages briefly in a combination of French oak barriques and stainless steel tanks, so it retains appealing freshness as well as a light cloak of spicy wood influence. The wine’s delicate nature meshes with its marked purity and intensity of character, in a balance that posits bright acidity with delicious red fruit flavors and a mere hint of dusty tannic resonance. A real treat. Winemaker was Nadine Worley. Drink now through 2016 into 2017. Very Good+. About $17.

Imported by Accolade Wines North America, Napa, Calif. A sample for review.

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