It’s not merely a matter of custom but a case of government regulation that the vineyards of Burgundy are officially measured, assessed and codified. The French love to be orderly and rational about these things, though one could argue that when it comes to classifying tiny vineyards no more distant from each other than the width of a country lane or ancient stone wall rationality has little to do with it. Still, the division of vineyards into the status of Village, Premier Cru and Grand Cru and the retention of that code form the basis upon which Burgundy works its magic and cements its reputation as the origin of some of the finest chardonnay and pinot noir wines in the world. This scheme, based on the supposition of the quality of the vineyards, that is, the terroir, and the wines they produce, holds true from Marsannay at the northern end of the Côte de Nuits to Saint-Véran at the southern tip of the Maconnais. I’m sorry that the Wine of the Day, No. 52, isn’t one of those fine chardonnays or pinot noirs from the Côte de Noir or Côte de Beaune — not that I wouldn’t mind tasting a few of those, please, sir — but My Readers won’t be too sorry, since those rare wines cost many hundreds of dollars. Instead, I offer a classy, beguiling and reasonably priced chardonnay from the Mâconnais, the Albert Bichot Viré-Clessé 2013. The region was awarded its own AOC in 1999, consisting of the communes of Clessé, Laizé, Montbellet and Viré in the sprawling and irregularly shaped AOC of Mâcon-Villages. Chardonnay is the only grape permitted. The Albert Bichot Viré-Clessé 2013 was fermented 80 percent in stainless steel and 20 percent in oak barriques and then aged — depending on the demands or blessings of the vintage — 12 to 15 months in the same vessels. The color is shimmering pale gold with a faint flush of green; aromas of lightly spiced green apple, pineapple and grapefruit are infused with a sense of limestone and flint minerality and notes of jasmine and honeysuckle. The wine passes lightly and deftly over the palate, but leaves an impression of pleasing fullness and an almost talc-like texture; bright acidity, however, keeps it spanking fresh and crisp. Citrus flavors take on shadings of pear and peach, all set within the context of chiseled and scintillating limestone elements where oak places a fleeting footprint. Alcohol content is 13 percent. Now through 2017 or ’18 with appetizers and main courses centered on fish and seafood, particularly grilled trout with brown butter and capers, seared salmon or swordfish with a mildly spicy rub; ideal for picnic-and-patio drinking; nothing too rich or heavy, mirroring the delicacy and directness of the wine. You’re not looking for anything profound here, and none such will you find; the motivation is delight and deliciousness. Very Good+. About $19, a local purchase.

European Wine Imports, Cleveland, Ohio.