In the past three days, the friendly, if not incredulous, UPS and FedEx drivers have traveled numerous times to my threshold, delivering wines for review. Almost five cases in fact. A similar circumstance prevailed last week. That’s a lot of wine, and I’m sure you understand that there’s already an enormous amount of wine in the house.

It’s easy to understand why so much vinous product is being sent to me now. The weather is perfect, neither frigid nor torrid, so wine will not be ruined during its passage, typically from the West Coast or the Northeast. I’m certain that wine reviewers exist who receive more wine than I do, but I’ll admit that the amount of wine currently stacking up chez Koeppel is overwhelming. I know, I know, unsympathetic readers are muttering, “Oh, gee, poor guy, having to drink all that free wine,” as if I actually consume the contents of every bottle and as if every wine delivered to my door is a Grand Cru Burgundy, First Growth Bordeaux or vintage Champagne. (Full disclosure: It never is.)

The idea, of course, is to taste the wine, not scarf it down, though I tend to save the best or most interesting wines for dinner. The sordid truth is most of the wine gets tasted in the kitchen, in a fairly rigid swirl-sniff-sip/spit-swallow-spit ritual and the rest of the product gets poured — oh, the horror! — into the sink. That’s the way it’s done, folks.

How do I decide what wines go through the process? As with most matters in life, there’s a hierarchy. Here, then, is an outline of how the wines I taste and write about are arranged on the priority scale. Pay heed.

1. The wines I give most attention to are those that are sent after a winery or importer’s representative or marketing person sends me an email asking if I would be interested in tasting such and such wines and may they send them to me. It helps that the wines in question embody great quality or reputation or have an intriguing geographical, historical or personal background or story. (I don’t need the whole story in that email.)

2.Second in priority are wines that arrive, whether after inquiry or not, from wineries or producers with whom I have a long record of tasting and writing about their wines.

3. Third in line are wines that arrive unheralded but that seem promising in terms of their history, heritage, geographical significance or grape make-up or that fit into whatever my present wine-tasting mode is. Yes, friends, it’s a crap-shoot.

4. Finally, down here, is the slough of plonk that makes me wonder if people who send out wine ever read this blog.

Will every wine I receive be reviewed on BTYH? Nosiree, the world does not hold enough time and space for me to accomplish that feat. In fact, I encourage people who submit wines for my perusal to remember that just as newspapers do not review all the books they are sent, so do wine writers not review all the wines delivered to their doors. Book reviewers plead eyesight; we plead the health of our livers.

I’ll admit that it’s gratifying to open a wine sent anonymously, as it were, and discover true greatness or, alternatively, true decent quaffability. In an ideal world, though, I’d like prior notice.