It’s true that Thanksgiving has come and gone, but I wanted to offer my notes — made in the kitchen, not at the table; that would be impolite — on the wines we imbibed during and after the great feast. I always offer a riesling, this year two, a zinfandel and a pinot noir, and I don’t usually deviate from the actual wines. Of course, Christmas is coming right up, and many households will mount the same or a similar meal, so these wines, or ones like them, would be equally appropriate. The idea, as you have doubtless read a thousand times in the past few weeks, is to serve wines that somehow encompass the range of Thanksgiving dinner’s complimentary and contradictory sweet and savory sensations. This trio has stood the test of the FK/LL groaning board for years, changing only vintages as time rolls along; the added riesling is one that I have tasted from several past vintages and never been disappointed. Unless indicated, these wines were purchased by me. Today’s reviews in Weekend Wine Notes are rather more full-bodied than usual. Enjoy!
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The additional wine this year was the Smith-Madrone Riesling 2012, Spring Mountain District, Napa Valley, produced by brothers Charles and Stuart Smith, who share growing and winemaking duties. The color is a shimmery pale gold with fleeting green highlights; aromas of green apple, pear and lemon are infused with jasmine, lime peel and limestone. Flavors of roasted lemon, lychee and peach are fresh, ripe and lightly spiced, while crisp acidity and scintillating limestone and flint minerality lend the wine verve and excitement. 12.5 percent alcohol. Production was 463 cases. Drink now through 2018 to 2020. This was a sample for review. Excellent. About $27.
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The Trefethen Dry Riesling, Oak Knoll District, Napa Valley, has appeared at our Thanksgiving dinner for years. I tend to like this riesling with a year or two of age — in 2011, we drank the ’08; in 2010, we drank the ’07 — to give it some golden burnish, and I mean that in terms of color but also metaphorically in a sense of sensual glow. The 2012 was what my local wine merchant had on the shelf, though, and he remembered that I like this wine at the present festive time of year. So, the color of the Trefethen Dry Riesling 2012 is very pale straw-gold; a bouquet of apple, pear and lychee wreathes notes of peach and honeysuckle and an intriguing hint of petrol or rubber eraser. In the mouth, flavors of roasted lemon and spiced pear are pointed with ginger and quince and equipped with a spare elegant texture that features crackling acidity and high-toned chalk and flint qualities. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2016 to ’18. Excellent. About $23.
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In 2010, we drank the Domaine Serene Yamhill Cuvée Pinot Noir 2007, Willamette Valley, with Thanksgiving leftovers. This year was the turn of the Domaine Serene Yamhill Cuvée Pinot Noir 2009. The Yamhill Cuvée is the winery’s cadet pinot noir, made from estate vineyards but not as a single-vineyard or reserve wine. I first tasted the 2009 at a trade event in the middle of February this year; I bought a bottle last week, and it feels as if the wine — or at least this bottle — is reaching the peak of its development. The color is radiant medium ruby with a touch of garnet; notes of black cherries, plums and black currants are touched with elements of fruitcake, smoked game and loam. A few minutes in the glass bring out hints of melon and sour cherry that linger above a supple satiny texture buoyed by moderate tannins and slightly fading acidity. Quite delicious but not as fresh and vibrant as the example I tried nine months ago. Very Good+. About $45.

Image, much cropped, from sipswirlsavor.com.
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It’s not exactly cheating, but this year, instead of buying a bottle, as I usually do, of the Ridge Vineyards Three Valleys, a red blend that includes zinfandel, I substituted a 100 percent zinfandel wine, the Ridge Benito Dusi Ranch Zinfandel 2011, Paso Robles. This, I think, was the Wine of Night. Made from vines planted in 1923, and aged 12 months in a combination of one- to five-year-old American oak barrels, the Ridge Paso Robles Zinfandel 2011 — the label, as you see, emphasizes the AVA rather than the single vineyard — offers a lovely dark ruby color with a lighter magenta rim; a bright and lively bouquet of raspberries, black currants and plums is highlighted by notes of red cherries, briers and brambles and a touch of black fruit compote. On the palate, the wine weaves smoke and leather and graphite with raspberry and black currant flavors wrapped around an intense core of violets, lavender and dried thyme, all supported by moderately dusty and chewy tannins and a fine line of crisply etched acidity. 14.5 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $30 .
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