Lambrusco, the slightly fizzy red wine made in Italy’s Emilia-Romagna region, tends to be dismissed as soda-pop by most wine consumers in the USA, especially if they remember and were burned by all those television commercials in the 1970s, back before most of you bright youngsters were born. Lambrusco, however, is the classic wine of Emilia-Romagna, and if you happened to dine in a restaurant in Bologna or Modena (the center of Lambrusco production) chances are that you would be sipping a delightful and darkly fruity Lambrusco to cut the richness of the food. Our Wine of the Week is the Cleto Chiarli “Vigneto Enrico Cialdini” 2011, Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro, made by a estate launched in 1860, when Cleto Chiarli decided to close his inn, the Trattoria dell’Artigliere (“the gunners’ restaurant”) and go into full-time production of the Lambrusco he had been making for his patrons. This selection from the firm’s roster is named for Enrico Cialdini, Duca di Gaeta (1811-1892), soldier, politician, diplomat and foe of Garibaldi; in some circles Cialdini is regarded — still! — as a war criminal, so it’s interesting, I think, and by “interesting” I mean “strange,” that this single vineyard Lambrusco comes from a property named for such a controversial figure (who was born near Castelvetro, so maybe he’s a grandfathered-in local hero of sorts). Anyway, he said, actually knowing very little about 19th Century Italian politics, and by “very little” I mean “doodly-squat” (except for that movie with Burt Lancaster), the Cleto Chiarli “Vigneto Enrico Cialdini” 2011, Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro, is more than just charming and delightful. The color is dark purple-magenta with an intense violet rim; the wine is grapy and teasingly effervescent, bursting with deep notes of ripe blackberries, raspberries and black cherries imbued with hints of violets and rose petals; it’s very dry, spicy and savory, incredibly refreshing with swingeing acidity, yet with surprising depth of earthiness and smoke and a sense of burgeoning graphite minerality. All this and only 11 percent alcohol, so you can drink a lot. In moderation, of course. And versatile. I had a glass of this for lunch one day with spaghetti with roasted cherry tomatoes and yellow peppers, salami, green olives and Parmesan and that night with a grilled veal chop; it was perfect with both dishes. Drink up. Excellent. About — gasp! — $15, representing Insane Value.

Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif. A sample for review. I will be looking at a variety of Italian wines this week.