August 2013



All of these Italian wines — a rosé, a white and four reds — qualify as Excellent Value and, if not in your immediate neighborhood, Worth a Search. Prices range from about $10 to about $18. Little technical, historical or geographical information; rather, these brief reviews are intended to spark your interest and inspire your palates. All were samples for review. Enjoy, on this Labor Day weekend.
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Beni di Batasiolo Gavi 2011, Piedmont. 12.5% alc. 100% cortese grapes. Light straw-gold color with faint green highlights; roasted lemons, yellow plums, grapefruit; cloves, quince and ginger; brisk and saline; opens to hint of peach, almond blossom and a slightly honeyed aspect; very dry, packed with elements of limestone and shale minerality; blade-like acidity cuts a swath; lovely transparency and balance. Now through 2014. Very Good+. About $14.
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Beni di Batasiolo Rosé 2011, Piedmont. 80% barbera, 15% dolcetto, 5% nebbiolo. Medmium copper color with a flush of salmon; dried red currants and plums, hints of raspberry and mulberry; cloves, dried violets and rose petals; very dry, heaps of limestone and flint minerality but complimented by notes of ripe red fruit, black tea, orange zest and cloves. Delicate, delightful, refreshing. Very Good+. About $18.
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Coltibuono Cetamura Chianti 2011, Toscana. 13% alc. 90% sangiovese, 10% canaiolo. Dark ruby color; spicy black and red fruit scents and flavors, with hints of plum and pomegranate; touches of smoke, leather and underbrush; quite dry, a bit dusty, with vibrant acidity for a lively structure and mouth-feel; very tasty and drinkable, now through 2014. Perfect, simple pasta and pizza wine. Very Good. About $10.
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Li Veli Primonero 2010, Salento. 13.5% alc. 85% negroamaro, 15% primitivo. Deep, dark, rustic, robust, hearty; ruby-purple with a mulberry cast; blackberries, blueberries and raspberries, a tantalizing hint of lilac; very spicy, very lively; in the depths, tar, lavender, bitter chocolate, super intense and concentrated black and blue fruit flavors, a sort of overripe but rigorous bruise-like character, graphite and granitic minerality, leather and licorice. Now through 2015. About $13.
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Poggio Vignoso Chianti 2011, Toscana. 13.5% alc. 85% sangiovese, 10% canaiolo, 5% malvasia. An attractive old-fashioned Chianti aged in 10-year-old Slovenian oak barrels. Medium ruby color; ripe, fleshy and meaty, spiced and macerated red cherries and currants with touches of melon and sour cherry; a little earthy and briery, with brisk acidity; smooth but leathery tannins and notes of supple and subtle wood; hint of violet on the finish. Now through 2015. Very Good+. About $15 but discounted around the country as low as $10.
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Sikelia Nero d’Avola 2011, Sicily. 13% alc. 100% nero d’avola grapes. Seeing no barrel aging, this wine retains appealing freshness and immediacy while keeping faith with the grape’s dark, tarry, foresty and deeply spicy nature; dark ruby-purple color; earthy and funky, ripe, meaty and fleshy; smoke, blackberries and blueberries (with a hint of blueberry tart); graphite, deep dark Platonic black cherry elements; rustic, muscular, supple. Now through 2015 or ’16. Very Good+. About $15 but seen as low as $11. ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Casting about for a wine to consume with Jamie Oliver’s Pasta alla Norma — a concoction primarily of tomatoes, basil, garlic and eggplant — I opened the Allegrini Valpolicella 2012, made in stainless steel from a blend of 65 percent corvina Veronese, 30 percent rondinella and 5 percent molinara. The term “Veronese” is a signifier; the Valpolicella area lies to the northeast of the lovely ancient city of Verona that stands almost halfway between Venice and Lake Garda in the Veneto region. Allegrini is a family-run estate that was established in 1858; Franco Allegrini is winemaker. This wine, the Allegrini Valpolicella 2012, is basically a Valpolicella Classico, but the Allegrini family decided to finish the bottle with a convenient screw-cap; Italian wine-law does not permit a “Classico” designation on the label of a screw-cap wine. You are getting, then, a lot of complexity for the price. The wine is a dark ruby color with a touch of violet-purple at the rim; this is incredibly fresh and appealing yet with intimations of dark ripeness and spice, of an earthy, graphite-flecked nature that provides some depth and layering. Don’t get all het up though; the Allegrini Valpolicella 2012 is primarily a delicious and deeply berryish wine meant for drinking over the next two years. Aromas of red and black cherries and a touch of blackberry are tinged with tar and rose petals and some sandalwood-inflected rooty tea. The texture is easy on the palate, and acidity makes the wine lively and quenching; black and red fruit flavors open to hints of dry and moderately grainy tannins, while a few moments in the glass unfold just enough briery,brambly, granitic character to give the wine a bit of gravity. 13 percent alcohol. Very Good+. About $17.

Imported by Winebow, Inc., New York. A sample for review.

… but you really should buy the Tortarossa 2010, Toscana, by the case to drink over the next year. It’s a blend of 50 percent sangiovese, 20 percent merlot, 20 percent cabernet sauvignon and 10 percent syrah, making it sound rather like one of those experiments in blending from California, though the Tortarossa 2010 — the name means “red cake” — manages to hold on to what feels like an Italian, if not Tuscan, character. The color is medium ruby with a tinge of mulberry; aromas of black currants and plums, touched by dried red currants and cherries, are warm and spicy, ripe, fleshy and a little meaty. The wine is robust without being rustic and flavorful without being over-ripe; black and red fruit flavors are permeated by notes of cloves, oolong tea, violets and tar and borne up by bright acidity and a surprising amount of grainy, briery tannins. Yes, quite the personality, and it matches the carefree, winsome contortionist on the wonderful label. 14 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2014, maybe into 2015, with hearty pizzas and pasta dishes, burgers and roasts or (ahem) cheese toast. Winemaker was Alessandro Bacci. Very Good+. About $15, marking Great Value.

Imported by Largo Wines, Seattle, Wash. A sample for review.

We continue Italian Wine Week on BTYH with a superb food and wine pairing. LL and I made the Orecchiette Carbonara with Charred Brussels Sprouts a couple of nights ago, and to sip with it I opened the Manincor Réserve della Contessa 2010, Terlano Alto Adige, a blend of 60 percent pinot bianco, 30 percent chardonnay and 10 percent sauvignon blanc. I had not heard of this producer or wine, nor had I heard of the wine’s importer, Angels’ Share Wine Imports, nor of Adrian Chalk Selections. The wine came to my threshold courtesy of FedEx or UPS with no letter or technical material included, so I have no idea who actually sent me the wine. A little consultation with my research staff, Miss Google, revealed that the currant release of the wine is the 2012, so why was I sent the 2010? And why does the label use the French Réserve instead of the Italian Riserva? I was provoked almost to a state of existential quandrariness by these imponderables, though whatever qualms and questions weighed my spirit down were eased somewhat by the terrific quality of the wine, which, I think, at not quite three years old is drinking perfectly. The color is medium golden-yellow; super attractive aromas of roasted lemon and jasmine, orange blossom and wild thyme — “I know a bank where the wild thyme blows” — yellow plums and orange blossoms are highlighted by a sort of mountain meadow freshness and rosemary/pine resinous quality. The wine is sleek, spare and elegant, savory and saline, woven of citrus and stone-fruit flavors heightened by baking spices and limestone, lilac and flint, all shot through by crystalline acidity. Wonderful personality and presence. 13 percent alcohol. Drink now through 2015 or ’16. Excellent. About — close as I can figure — $28.

The pasta dish is from the September issue of Bon Appetit, and my advice is to get the ingredients and cook it right now. Here’s a link to the recipe. It’s from the restaurant Rolf and Daughters in Nashville. The wine was a sample for review.

Lambrusco, the slightly fizzy red wine made in Italy’s Emilia-Romagna region, tends to be dismissed as soda-pop by most wine consumers in the USA, especially if they remember and were burned by all those television commercials in the 1970s, back before most of you bright youngsters were born. Lambrusco, however, is the classic wine of Emilia-Romagna, and if you happened to dine in a restaurant in Bologna or Modena (the center of Lambrusco production) chances are that you would be sipping a delightful and darkly fruity Lambrusco to cut the richness of the food. Our Wine of the Week is the Cleto Chiarli “Vigneto Enrico Cialdini” 2011, Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro, made by a estate launched in 1860, when Cleto Chiarli decided to close his inn, the Trattoria dell’Artigliere (“the gunners’ restaurant”) and go into full-time production of the Lambrusco he had been making for his patrons. This selection from the firm’s roster is named for Enrico Cialdini, Duca di Gaeta (1811-1892), soldier, politician, diplomat and foe of Garibaldi; in some circles Cialdini is regarded — still! — as a war criminal, so it’s interesting, I think, and by “interesting” I mean “strange,” that this single vineyard Lambrusco comes from a property named for such a controversial figure (who was born near Castelvetro, so maybe he’s a grandfathered-in local hero of sorts). Anyway, he said, actually knowing very little about 19th Century Italian politics, and by “very little” I mean “doodly-squat” (except for that movie with Burt Lancaster), the Cleto Chiarli “Vigneto Enrico Cialdini” 2011, Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro, is more than just charming and delightful. The color is dark purple-magenta with an intense violet rim; the wine is grapy and teasingly effervescent, bursting with deep notes of ripe blackberries, raspberries and black cherries imbued with hints of violets and rose petals; it’s very dry, spicy and savory, incredibly refreshing with swingeing acidity, yet with surprising depth of earthiness and smoke and a sense of burgeoning graphite minerality. All this and only 11 percent alcohol, so you can drink a lot. In moderation, of course. And versatile. I had a glass of this for lunch one day with spaghetti with roasted cherry tomatoes and yellow peppers, salami, green olives and Parmesan and that night with a grilled veal chop; it was perfect with both dishes. Drink up. Excellent. About — gasp! — $15, representing Insane Value.

Dalla Terra Winery Direct, Napa, Calif. A sample for review. I will be looking at a variety of Italian wines this week.

Two weeks ago in this space I dissed a number of chardonnay wines from Cuvaison, Davis Bynum, La Follette and La Rochelle wineries. Today, in addition to other pinot noir wines from California, I offer some reviews of successful pinot noirs from the aforementioned producers, not in recompense — I would never do that — but to show that they can indeed make wines that are balanced and authentic. So, 12 wines, brief reviews, no emphasis on technical, historical, geographical or personal data but just my notes, some taken directly — ripped, as it were — from my notebook pages, some expanded upon a bit; but all designed to pique your interest and whet your palate. Most of these pinots, whose ratings fall into the narrow range of Very Good+ to Excellent, do not conform to my notion of the grape’s hallowed ideal of delicacy, elegance and tensile strength, being more about structure and power, though on the California model they tend to perform well. These were samples for review. Enjoy!
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Cuvaison Estate grown Pinot Noir 2011, Napa Valley Carneros. 13.5% alc. Medium ruby-magenta color; very spicy, earthy and rooty, with moderate tannins and acidity that cuts a swath; still, super satiny in a fairly lithe manner and quite attractive with notes of red and black cherries, red currants, hints of rhubarb, cranberry and cloves; briers and brambles in the background and a touch of graphite. Now through 2015 or ’16. Excellent. About $38.
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Davis Bynum Jane’s Vineyard Pinot Noir 2011, Russian River valley. 14.5% alc. Medium ruby-mulberry color, slightly lighter ar the rim; exotic nose of cloves, allspice and sandalwood, like incense in your hippie pad; plums, red currants, cranberries; dense, chewy a bit more drapery than ordinary satin; rich with smoky plum flavors, black and red cherries; one feels indulged, a little decadent, though the earth-mint-mineral elements surge forth through the finish. Now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $40.
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Davis Bynum Jane’s Vineyard Garfield Block Pinot Noir 2011. Russian River Valley. 14.5% alc. 500 cases. This more limited version of the previous wine (in origin and production) is a shade darker in color, a little tighter, a bit more focused and delineated; it’s very supple and satiny but displays more of a tannic and mineral presence under its dark, succulent and spicy red and black cherry fruit with overtones of plums and mulberries; long, deep, earthy finish. Now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $60.
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DeLoach Vineyards Olivet Bench Pinot Noir 2011, Russian River Valley.13.5% alc. 499 cases. Medium ruby-mulberry color; plums and rhubarb, red and black cherries with a hint of cranberry after a few moments; dusty graphite, very spicy, exotic; dry, minerally, muscular, almost rigorous but super-satiny in texture; you feel the rooty-barky qualities and the undertow of tannin and oak. Try 2014 or ’15 through 2018 or ’19. Excellent. About $NA.
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Frank Family Pinot Noir 2011, Napa Valley Carneros. 14.5% alc. Radiant ruby-cranberry color; cloves, rhubarb and pomegranate, red cherries and currants, white pepper; smooth, sleek, suave and satiny; fairly tannic and rigorous after 30 or 40 minutes, with a full complement of earthy, briery, underbrushy and graphite elements but doesn’t lose its essential succulence and flavorful sway. Now through 2016 to ’17. Excellent. About $35.
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La Follette Sangiacomo Vineyard Pinot Noir 2011, Sonoma Coast. 12.9% alc (lovely!) 536 cases. Medium ruby with a touch of violet-blue magenta; meaty and fleshy, spiced and macerated; succulent and smoky red cherry and plum flavors imbued with briers, brambles and an underbrushy element; intensely spicy, intensely floral; superbly satiny texture but a rather startling structure for a pinot noir that needs a couple of years to find its footing. Try 2015 through 2019 or ’20. Excellent. About $40.
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La Rochelle Pinot Noir 2009, Santa Lucia Highlands. 15.2% alc. 381 cases. Medium ruby color with a trace of garnet at the rim; big, dense, pithy, sappy pinot noir, rich, warm and spicy but thrown off balance a bit by the high alcohol, which makes a distinct presence on the finish. Very Good+. About $38.
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La Rochelle Donum Estate Vineyard Pinot Noir 2010, Carneros. 14.7% alc. 259 six-packs. Medium ruby color with lovely transparency; better balance here than with the previously noted wine; the drawers of the bureau of exotic spices thrown wide, making for a heady and seductive bouquet and intriguing flavors of red and black currants, pomegranate and rhubarb; bright acidity plows a furrow through layers of briers, brambles and graphite, all the while the wine displays beautiful purity and intensity. Now through 2015 or ’16. Excellent. About $75.
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MacMurray Ranch Pinot Noir 2011, Central Coast. 14.3% alc. Medium ruby-mulberry color, trace of magenta at the rim; notes of pomegranate, cranberry and rhubarb open to red and black cherries permeated by cloves and cola; quite dry, a little mossy and briery; ripping acidity; attractive, lively and tasty though no great depth. Very Good+. About $23.
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MacMurray Ranch Pinot Noir 2011, Russian River Valley. 13.5% alc. Medium ruby color; rhubarb, cranberry, cola and cloves, touch of plum, interesting note of mint; leans more to black and red cherries in flavor; gains body and substance as minutes pass, a little rooty and mossy with tannins and earthy elements; very dry finish, oak and granitic minerality. Now through 2016 to ’18. Excellent. About $28.
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MacMurray Ranch Reserve Pinot Noir 2010, Russian River Valley. 15.2% alc. Dark ruby color with a touch of garnet; big, dry, leather and graphite; comes close to being dramatic; quite rich, warm and spicy but riven by scintillating acidity and dusty, dusky tannins; you feel the oak and alcohol on the finish. Not my favorite style for pinot noir. Now through 2016 to ’18. Very Good+. About $37.
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Morgan Winery Double L Vineyard Pinot Noir 2011, Santa Luicia Highlands. 14.2% alc. Medium ruby-magenta color with a pure violet rim; black and red cherries and currants; pomegranate, rhubarb and sassafras, hint of cloves; succulent but spare, elegant, lithe and muscular; scintillating acidity and granitic minerality; riveting purity and intensity of the grape and the vineyard. Always a favorite in our house. Now through 2016 to ’18. Excellent. About $54.
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Boy, we’ve had a lot of fun with these wines, pairing them with a variety of fish and seafood dishes like grilled swordfish and tuna, shrimp in a spicy Mexican preparation and also chicken with a citrus marinade. The wines, samples for review, originate in three regions: the vast Vinho Verde, north and east of the city of Oporto; Douro, the Port region east of Oporto, athwart the Douro river; and Alentejano, far to the south and lying southeast of Lisbon. I don’t know how widely available these wines are, so definitely mark them Worth a Search. By any measurement of charm, you won’t be sorry.
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Most of the vinho verde we encounter in the USA is meant for immediate consumption, being young, simple, fruity, slightly spritzy in some examples, a wine perfect for a summer afternoon or evening on the patio, on a picnic or at the beach; chill it, slurp it up, forget it. The Quinta de Azevedo Vinho Verde 2011, on the other hand, benefited from just a little age and reveals more structure and depth than the typical model. A blend of 70 percent loureiro grapes and 30 percent pedernã, the wine was made entirely in stainless steel tanks. The color is pale gold; the wine is very lemony and spicy, very dry and crisp, with subtle undertones of pear and peach and dried seaside herbage and salinity; it displays a slightly roasted and earthy nature that comes across as tangy and savory, all fueled by vibrant acidity and scintillating limestone minerality. The finish is characterized by a fairly austere chalk-and-steel quality. 11 percent alcohol. Winemaker was Manuel Vieira. Drink up. Very Good+. About — are you ready? — $10, representing One of the Greatest Wine Bargains in the Cosmos.

Imported by Evaton, Inc., Stamford, Conn.
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Next on this roster of delightful Portuguese white wines is the Herdade do Esporão Verdelho 2012, Alentejano. This light gold wine, made in stainless steel, is composed 100 percent of verdelho grapes. This is so fresh, clean, spicy and savory that it’s irresistible, though it does not possess the bright saline property of the previous wine. A bouquet of roasted lemon, ginger and quince opens to notes of lime peel and grapefruit and hints of jasmine and mango; plenty of limestone minerality and crystalline acidity keep the wine sprightly and vibrant, while an ardent spicy nature and pointed citrus and lightly tropical flavors make it downright delicious. (I’m having a glass as we speak with a serving of tuna salad for lunch.) The mineral and spice-flecked finish is surprisingly substantial for a wine at this price. 12 percent alcohol. Winemakers were David Baverstock and Sandra Alves. This could go into 2014. Very Good+. It will set you back all of 12 smackers, denoting Good Value.

When was the last time you saw a label that said “Since 1267″? Imported by Aidil Wines & Liquors, Newark, N.J.
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If you’re looking for exotic grape varieties to add to your list, try the Kopke Vinho Branco 2011, Douro, which is a blend of 50 percent arinto grapes, 45 percent gouveio and 5 percent rabigato. The color is pale gold; seductive aromas of roasted lemons and grapefruit peel, yellow plums, almond blossom, thyme and rosemary (with the hint of the latter’s resinous quality) are wreathed with lime and limestone; the wine is spicy and savory, cool and clean, partaking of a brine-laden sea-breeze and marsh grass quality and enlivened by brisk acidity and a bell-tone limestone element. The finish is almost audaciously earthy and minerally, deft and persistent. Of this trio, the Kopke Vinho Branco 2011 comes closest to the marriage of power and elegance. 13 percent alcohol. Winemaker was Francisco Gonçalves. Drink through 2015. Excellent. About $16, a Great Bargain.

Imported by SFW USA, Union N.J.
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Might as well say “Three from Randall Grahm,” since few wineries in California are so closely, indeed inextricably, tied up in the personality and technical prowess of its owner/winermaker. (Now that I think about it, that’s the way I start every review of wines from Bonny Doon; I’ll be more original next time.) The three wines I consider today are Boony Doon Bien Nacido X Block Syrah 2009 and two versions of Le Cigare Volant 2008, one aged in 500 and 600-liter puncheons (en demi-muid), the other in 10,000-liter upright wood tanks (en foudres). Grahm intends these wines to be vins de garde, that is, top wines of the vintage that will require aging to achieve drinkability, though I found the wines to be slightly more approachable than those of the previous years (2007 and 2008), reviewed here.

These were samples for review.
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Bonny Doon Le Cigare Volant “en demi-muid” 2008, Central Coast, and Bonny Doon Le Cigare Volant “en foudres” 2008, Central Coast, are each a blend of 45 percent grenache, 30 percent syrah, 13 mourvèdre, 7 cinsault, 5 carignane, which is to say, a quite typical southern Rhone Valley cepage, or combination of grapes. (For 2007, the blend for these wines was 50 percent grenache grapes, 32 percent syrah, 4 percent mourvèdre and 4 percent cinsault.)

The “en demi-muid” version aged 20 months in puncheons, 500 and 600-liter oak barrels. (The standard barrique is 225 liters.) The color is dark ruby-purple with a hint of magenta at the rim; the bouquet offers an intriguing combination of fresh black fruit and flowers with woody spice and dried fruit and flowers, all this with marked intensity and beguilement. Aromas of blackberries, black and red currants and a touch of plum are permeated by cloves and sandalwood, wood-smoke and clean earth, hints of graphite and briers and brambles. The texture is spare, sleek, and the structure a towering edifice of gently gritty and mildly velvety tannins; lip-smacking acidity; and slightly grainy burnished oak. This is very dry, very dusty, featuring tons of granitic minerality that need some gentling to allow the spicy black fruit flavors to unfurl, say 2015 through 2020 to ’22. Alcohol content is 14.2 percent. 556 cases were produced. Excellent. About $45.

How is the companion wine, the “en foudre,” different from the “en demi-muid” version? Aging in 10,000-liter upright oak tanks ensures that the ration of wine exposed to the oak influence is much less than in the puncheons, yet this “en foudre” 08 is still densely packed with woody spice and feels a little rooty and knotty. The color is dark, almost opaque ruby-purple with a tinge of violet at the rim; aromas of fruitcake, oolong tea, a sort of mossy-wet dog-smoky-autumn-leaves amalgam highlight a bouquet characterized by lavender and lilac, blackberries and plums, graphite and shale. The wine is lively and vital, with vivid acidity cutting a swath through black and blue fruit flavors bolstered by dense grainy tannins and a feeling of woody spice that’s almost ecclesiastical in its dusty, polished essence. here’s another wine that require aging, though this “en foudre” is a tad more approachable than its cousin “em demi-muid.” 14.2 percent alcohol. 559 cases. Try from 2014 or ’15 through 2020 to ’22. Excellent. About $45.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ The Bonny Doon Bien Nacido X Block Syrah 2009, Santa Maria Valley, derives from a particular section of the well-known vineyard in Santa Barbara County’s Santa Maria Valley. The color is dark ruby-purple; this is smoky, meaty and fleshy, ripe with spicy blackberry, black currant and plum scents and flavors with an undertone of blueberry tart and notes of smoke, leather and lavender. Exotic elements of sandalwood, cloves and pomegranate slightly lighten the wine’s essentially deep brooding spirit somehow, paradoxically, enlivened by almost pert acidity; the structure is large-framed, the texture stalwart with dusty tannins and polished oak, yet there’s something exhilarating and unfettered about this wine, with touches of spiced wild cherry on the mineral-packed finish and a teasing glimpse of fig and black tea. 13.3 percent alcohol. 843 cases, compared to 573 cases in 2008 and 657 in 2007. Try from 2014 or ’15 through 2020 to ’25. Excellent. About $50.
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I don’t typically use a wine at this price as the Wine of the Week, but the Reata Pinot Noir 2011, Napa and Sonoma counties, is so well-made and authentically pinot noirish that I couldn’t resist. I will not ask forgiveness and indeed would welcome expressions of gratitude from fans of the grape in its mode of utmost purity and intensity. The blend of this two-county wine is 64 percent of the rarely-seen Napa County designation (an AVA slightly larger than and encompassing Napa Valley) and 36 percent Sonoma County. The grapes ferment in stainless steel tanks, and the wine matures for 14 months in French oak barrels, 70 percent neutral, 30 percent new. The color is medium ruby with lovely transparency and limpidness; aromas of plums, red currants and cranberries are permeated with notes of cloves, sassafras and rhubarb and a hint of earthy briers and brambles. The wine is just so fresh and clean and pure, yet it displays beautiful depths of graphite and — a paradox — delicately granitic minerality and an almost lacy network of minutely dusty and elegantly plush, supple tannins with bright and vibrant acidity for structure and quenching liveliness. Red and blue fruit flavors are imbued with fruitcake-type spice and dried fruit, all these elements leading to a tea-like lithe, limber. lithic finish. Yeah, I really liked this pinot noir. 14.3 percent alcohol. Now through 2016 or ’17. Excellent. About $30, though often found around the country for $20 to $25.

A sample for review.


I keep reading that all the instruments agree that Millennials really love blended wines, but they must be drinking examples other than most of those mentioned in this post, because I found them to be bland and generic. The exception is Sokol Blosser’s Evolution American Red Wine, now in its Second Edition; it’s a cross-state wine — hence the “American” designation — “based on syrah” and heir to the reputation of the popular Evolution White Wine that debuted 13 years ago. There are other red wines in this roster of brief reviews, but frankly, other than the Evolution Red, not much roused my interest enough to subject my heavily insured palate to more than a few sips. Lotta wine went down the drain this morning! Glug, glug, glug! Quick reviews, mainly taken directly from my notes; no truck with technical, historical or geographical data; just the real deal. Enjoy — or not. Truly, sometimes I wonder why producers even bother. These were samples for review.

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Alamos Red Blend 2012, Mendoza, Argentina. 13.5% alc. Malbec, bonarda, tempranillo. Dark ruby color; solid, firm; juicy and spicy black and blue fruit flavors; dusty tannins and walnut-shell-tinged oak; a touch of graphite minerality. Fine for barbecue ribs or burgers. Very Good. About $13.
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Alamos Seleccion Malbec 2011, Mendoza, Argentina. 13.9% alc. Dark ruby color; aromas of black currants and black cherries, touch of blueberry; briers and brambles; robust and rustic, bright acidity plows a furrow, rollicking dusty tannins; black fruit flavors open to a core of violets, bittersweet chocolate and graphite; don’t look for elegance here, this is forthright, spicy, flavorful and solidly made. Very Good+. About $20.
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Albamar Pinot Noir 2012, Casablanca Valley, Chile. 13.9% alc. Very pretty light ruby color; earthy, briers and brambles, a little stalky and weedy; a schizo conflict between sweet ripe berry fruit and bruisingly dry austere tannins; way off base and unbalanced. Not recommended. About $13.
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Edna Valley Vineyard “Paragon” Pinot Noir 2011, Central Coast. 13.9% alc. (A Gallo label.) Neither smells nor tastes like pinot noir; generic, bland, innocuous, forgettable. Not recommended. About $20.
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Evolution American Red Wine, 2nd edition. 13% alc. Bottled by Sokol Blosser. “Syrah-based.” Dark ruby color; roots and branches, earthy yet ripe, fleshy, a little funky; very berryish, very spicy; lots of personality and engagement; black currants, cherries and plums with a touch of mulberry; dusty, pretty serious tannins, lively acidity; tasty but with plenty of stuffing. Says, “Bring me a lamb chop.” Very Good+. About $15, marking Good Value.
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Four Vines Truant Old Vine Zinfandel 2010, California. 14.4% alc. 77% zinfandel, 13% syrah, 5% petite sirah, 3% barbera, 2% sangiovese. Medium ruby color; generic but pleasant, which is better than being generic but unpleasant. Good only. About $12. And how old were those vines?
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Gascon Colosal Red Blend 2011, Mendoza, Argentina. 14.1% alc. Malbec, bonarda, syrah, cabernet sauvignon. Dark ruby color; fresh, clean and bright, fruity but not distinctive, fairly generic but no real flaws. Good only. About $15.
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La Crema Pinot Noir 2011, Monterey County. 13.5% alc. Intense ruby-mulberry color; lovely bouquet of beetroot, cloves and sassafras and a spectrum of red and black fruit, hint of earthy briers and brambles; very spicy and earthy in the mouth, plum and cherry fruit is slightly roasted and fleshy; quite dry, the tannins and oak assert themselves in a welter of woody spice and dusty graphite; finish is a bit short but a very enjoyable, moderately complex pinot noir. Now through 2015. Very Good+. About $23.
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The Spur 2011, Livermore Valley. 13.5% alc. (From Murrieta’s Well) Petite sirah 31%, petit verdot 29%, cabermet sauvignon 27%, malbec 8%, cabernet franc 5%. Dark ruby color; mint and iodine, lavender, bittersweet chocolate; blackberries, black currants and blueberries, quite spicy; dry plush tannins, dusty graphite, zinging acidity, almost too lively; tannins coat the mouth, from mid-palate back the flavors feel curiously bland. Very Good. About $25.
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Waterstone Merlot 2010, Napa Valley. 14.5% alc (tech sheet says 15.1). Dark ruby color; solid, firm structure; deep dusty tannins and graphite minerality; black and red currants and cherries, touch of plum; nice complexity of cedar and dried rosemary, tobacco and black olive; stalwart tannins, dusty and earthy; finish packed with spice, tannin and graphite. Now through 2015 or ’16. Very Good+. About $18.
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