Gregory Hecht and François Bannier founded their negociant firm in 2002 to exploit favorable appellations and vineyard sites in France’s vast Languedoc, a region that encompasses most of the country’s southwest geography that lies along the Mediterranean coast as it slants down toward Spain. Grapes for the Hecht & Bannier Rosé 2012 derive from one of my favorite place-names in France, Étang de Thau, and from the ancient grape-growning area of Saint Chinian, situated at the foot of the Massif Centrale. The étangs form a series of long narrow lakes between the coast and slender islands, all the way from the mouth of the Rhone river to the foothills of the Pyrenees; Étang de Thau is the largest of these lakes. Though Saint Chinian is rocky and landlocked, it still opens to the south to maritime influence. The blend of the Hecht & Bannier Rosé 2012, Languedoc, is 34 percent grenache, 33 percent syrah and 33 percent cinsault. Boy, this is a fresh, tart, clean rose, even a bit sassy. The color is pale copper with a faint peach-like flush, and in fact, under the pert strawberry and raspberry aromas and flavors, there’s a hint of ripe peach and, oddly, gooseberry, for a decided lift in the buoyant bouquet. The wine is quite dry, yet juicy with red and blue berry flavors and a touch of melon; in the background lie hints of dried Mediterranean herbs and a burgeoning stony element. The whole package is delicately strung yet imbued with the tensile energy of crisp acidity. 12.5 percent alcohol. A great wine for porch, patio and picnic. Drink through the end of this year. Very Good+. Prices around the country start at an astonishing $9 but realistically look for $13 to $15.

Imported by Frederick Wildman & Sons, New York. Tasted at a trade event and as a sample for review.