A local wine store offered some products on sale, two of which piqued my interest. These were the Domaine A. et P. de Villaine Bouzeron 2009 and the Frédéric Magnien Chablis Premier Cru Vaillons 2009. The first was about $17, marked down from $30; the second was about $30, marked down from $50. I couldn’t resist. Technically, each wine is classified as Burgundy, though neither derives from vineyards in the Côte d’Or, what we may call Burgundy proper. Bouzeron is a village in the Côte Chalonnaise which has had its own appellation since 1997, only for wines made from the aligoté grape. Côte Chalonnaise, named for the city of Chalon-sur-Saône, lies just below the Burgundian region of Santenay, at the southeastern-most tail of the Côte d’Or. Chablis, on the other hand, is not connected geographically with Burgundy and in fact stands almost equidistant between Dijon and Paris. The connection is that its wines are made from the chardonnay grape, as are the great white wines of Burgundy’s Meursault, Puligny-Montrachet and Chassagne-Montrachet appellations.
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Audibert de Villaine, a man whose very quietness and self-affacement exude a kind of unimpeachable authority, is not only the owner, with his wife Pamela, of Domaine A. et P. de Villaine but the co-proprietor and manager of Domaine de la Romanée-Conti, an estate based in Vosne-Romanée that produces only Grand Cru wines and is generally regarded as not only the most prestigious producer in Burgundy but among the best in the world. The contrast between the domaines could not be more pronounced in terms of the wines they make, yet de Villaine operates each with integrity and acumen. Domaine A. et P. de Villaine has been certified organic since 1986. Beside the Bouzeron, the domaine produces Mercurey les Montots, Rully les Saint-Jacques and several different Bourgogne Côte Chalonnaise wines. Minimal new oak is employed, with the domaine depending on used barriques, large foudres and stainless steel. The Bouzeron is aged about 20 percent in barriques. The domaine uses not the aligoté vert grape but its cousin, the more aromatic and flavorful aligoté doré.

The A. et P. de Villaine Bouzeron 2009 offers a brilliant medium gold color and shy aromas of roasted lemons and yellows plums with hints of limestone and chalk and dried thyme, all sketched with delicacy and a slight feeling of attenuation, a papery quality. As the wine warmed gently in the glass, it brought up a modicum of spice and floral elements — ghosts of cloves and jasmine — and also expanded its grip on limestone and flint minerality, so that in a few moments, I felt as if I were sipping pure minerals, a factor that contributed scintillating austerity from mid-palate back through the finish. The texture is lithe and lively but not dynamic, and I could not shake the feeling that the wine was several shades diminished from what it would have been in, say, 2011. Still, an enjoyable and instructive experience and not a bad accompaniment to fish tacos. 12.5 percent alcohol. If any readers have this wine on hand, I would say, Drink up, certainly by the end of 2013. Very Good+. About $17, on sale.

Imported by Kermit Lynch Wine Merchant, Berkeley, Ca.
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LL and I seldom finish a bottle of wine at dinner these days; the two-bottle-night era is some 20 years in the past. Last night, however, we gulped down with glee and gratitude the last drops of the Frédéric Magnien Chablis Premier Cru Vaillons 2009. Have mercy, what a wine! And what a great match with LL’s sea-bass baked in a package with asparagus, lemon and oregano.

Frédéric Magnien founded his negociant house in 1995, but he still makes the wines for his father’s Domaine Michel Magnien. The father owns slices of Premier Cru and Grand Cru vineyards; the son purchases grapes on long-term contract from growers he trusts, some of whom he directly oversees in the vineyard. It’s not uncommon for negociants in Burgundy — Frédéric Magnien is based in Morey-Saint-Denis — to extend their sway to Chablis, as happens also, for example, with Joseph Drouhin and Louis Jadot. At almost four years old, the Frédéric Magnien Chablis Premier Cru Vaillons 2009 is fresh as a daisy, charming and vibrant and elegant, packed with the trademark Chablis characteristics of gunflint, sauteed mushrooms, nervy acidity and a tremendous limestone-shale element that permeates every iota without dominating the wine. The bouquet delivers hints of quince and ginger, camellia and a tantalizing trace of lilac and a mysterious whiff of cloves and lemongrass; in the mouth, this Vaillons Premier Cru is lean and supple, vividly etched, yet with a generosity of texture and structure that’s downright seductive, all of these aspects combined in an energetic form that keeps you coming back to the glass; lyrical, yes, but with a staccato edge. Just lovely purity, intensity and excitement and made to age another five or six years. 13 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $30 on sale.

North Berkeley Imports, Berkeley, Ca.
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