I don’t mind admitting that I’m a fan of Crémant d’Alsace, not as a substitute for Champagne or the finest sparkling wine from California but just as itself. Something about the combination of grapes, usually riesling, pinot blanc and chardonnay, speaks to the expression of the region and makes the product unique. We’ve tried quite a few in the past few weeks, and certainly among the best is the Domaine Barmès Buecher 2009. It’s unusual to see Crémant d’Alsace with a vintage date; like many Champagnes and sparkling wines, most are a blend of several vintages. The domaine was founded by wife and husband Genevieve Buecher Barmès and François Barmès — surnames that point to the region’s Franco-German heritage — with vineyards that had belonged to their respective families since the 17th century. Tragically, François Barmès was killed in October 2011, when he was struck by an automobile while riding his bike. Their children Sophie and Maxime are now part of the organization. The estate is operated on biodynamic methods.

The Domaine Barmés Buecher 2009, Crémant d’Alsace, offers a radiant but mild straw color and a tempest of bubbles that look like fervent tarnished glints in the golden hue. The immediate and fresh impression is of apples, limes and limestone, with hints of roasted lemons, lime peel and cloves in the background. This model, very dry, very crisp, is more substantial than most examples of the genre, and you cannot help sensing the confidence and the character that it implies. It’s slightly macerated and toasty in the mouth, with touches of coffee and caramel, yet never less than elevating and effervescent. The finish brings in more limestone, inflected with flint, and a reiteration of spicy citrus flavors. 12.5 percent alcohol. Drinking beautifully at three years, this should be fine through 2014. Excellent. About $22.

Imported by Petit Pois Corp. t/a Sussex Wine Merchants, Moorestown, N.J. This bottle was a sample for review.

Birthdays on December 27 include scientists Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) and Louis Pasteur (1822-1895) — who discovered the principle of fermentation; actors Sydney Greenstreet (1879-1954) and Marlene Dietrich (1901-1992); and poet Charles Olson (1910-1970).