… or something like that. The Trim Edge and Fuse project represents a sideline for Napa Valley’s Signorello Estate winery, whose Estate Cabernet Sauvignon 2009 I reviewed last week. Trim, Edge and Fuse, predominantly cabernet sauvignon, represent interesting variations on the theme of the grape treated for prices raging from cheap ($12) to moderate ($20) to moderately expensive ($28) while retaining an identifiable linking character, which is to say, polished and voluminously fruity yet intelligently structured. Interestingly, each wine contains some syrah. Grapes are sourced — that is, purchased — from the North Coast counties and, for Fuse, from Napa Valley. Alcohol levels are kept at a tolerable 13.8 percent. As you can see from the striking labels, these are stylish packages and stylish wines, but they don’t feel fraught or mannered.

These wines were samples for review.
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Trim Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, California, is a blend of 83 percent cabernet, 9 percent merlot and 8 percent syrah. The color is dark ruby-purple with a magenta-violet rim. The exotic bouquet teems with notes of smoke and lavender, cloves and sandalwood, cedar and dried thyme, blackberries and black currants and a hint of black olive. Flavors are pure black currants and black raspberries circumscribed by a distinct contour of spice, smoke, dried flowers and graphite and are supported by velvety (but not opulent) tannins and a backbone of bright acidity. A real crowd-pleaser. Very Good+. About $12, a Great Value. In fact, I would say that Trim ’10 is one of the best cabernet sauvignon wines priced under $15 made in California.
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The black-clad Edge Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, North Coast, like the hipster of this trio, is all smoke and charcoal and cool graphite, while sporting an opaque ruby-purple haircut, I mean color, and intense and concentrated scents and flavors of deeply spiced and macerated black currants, cherries and raspberries. To 86 percent cabernet sauvignon is blended 9 percent syrah and 5 percent merlot. Though it’s more velvet glove than iron fist, the wine offers enough tannic, acid and oak foundation and framing to keep it on the straight and narrow path. It’s a real mouthful of dark savory supple cabernet that would be terrific with braised short ribs or lamb shanks. Very Good+. About $20.
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We would hope, if not expect, that the most expensive of these three wines and the one that derives from the most specific appellation — though amorphous enough — would display the most intensity and concentration and the most character. Fuse Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, Napa Valley, does not disappoint in those aspects. Here, we get substantially more syrah — 15 percent — blended with 82 percent cabernet and only 3 percent merlot. This is indeed the biggest of these cousins, the sturdiest, the most dense and chewy, the earthiest, the most rigorous in its licorice and bittersweet chocolate-licked blaze of black and blue fruit scents and flavors. Drink now with a steak or give it a year. Excellent. About $28.
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