We drink quite a few rieslings because the wines can be versatile, matching well with a variety of dishes. Primarily, we try rieslings with fish preparations but also with certain pasta dishes and risottos and with light meats like pork and (when LL is traveling and I’m cooking on my own) veal. The combination of crisp acidity, floral and stone-fruit scents and flavors, sometimes intense spiciness and an underlying earthiness that rieslings often embody — as well as a touch of initial sweetness — also bode well for drinking with moderately hot Indian and Southeast Asian fare.

Lately, we’ve had the Domäne Wachau Federspiel Terassen Riesling 2011, Wachau, Austria, at home with salmon and swordfish and a vegetarian pasta. (I was sent two bottles.) Made all in stainless steel — winemaker is Heinz Frischengruber — this sprightly riesling offers the palest of pale gold colors and a delicate bouquet woven of apples, peaches and pears, touches of jasmine and honeysuckle, hints of lychee and petrol (or rubber eraser) and a background of damp limestone. Sounds pretty irresistible, huh? By sprightly I don’t mean that the wine is effervescent but that it’s brisk, lively and vibrant and that these buoyant qualities animate the tasty and moderately rich flavors of pears and yellow plums — there’s a wisp of baked apple — but before you think that this all feels sort of exuberant, I’ll say that the wine is a tissue of nuances and that from mid-palate back it’s modulated by crystalline acidity and limestone minerality. A nicely balanced 12 percent alcohol. Very Good+. About $13, a Terrific Bargain.

The intensely picturesque Wachau, a UNESCO Heritage Site, lies along the Danube between the towns of Melk and Krems. The “Terrassen” designation on the label of this wine refers to the steep terraced slopes that line the river. Wachau is the smallest of Austria’s vineyard and wine-producing regions and the most inland; the country’s wine areas are all in the easternmost part of Austria, primarily adjacent to the borders with the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary and Slovenia.

Imported by Vin Divino, Chicago. A sample for review.